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Quinte Area Bird Report (ARCHIVED) PDF Print E-mail
Written by Terry Spraque   
Jul 21, 2017 at 03:00 AM

 THE QUINTE AREA BIRD REPORT (ARCHIVED PAGE)

with daily reports from the last two months

 ( to see * today's Report * in its new, easier to read format, CLICK HERE )

 

 Saturday, July 15 to Friday, July 21:

Certainly this past week proved that despite the commonly held belief that bird activity is at its lowest ebb this month and there is nothing of interest to see until the fall migration rolls around, there is actually plenty to see in the way of birds. Part of the reason could be the somewhat cooler temperatures for this time of year prompting some birds to break out into song that would otherwise be quiet. Also, the “fall” migration is, in fact, underway, evident by several species of adult shorebirds that began appearing en masse this week. Since Prince Edward County had the most action this past week, we will start there.
 
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
The flooded agricultural fields on Huff’s Island Road, south of Belleville, continue to produce a variety of wetland birds and other species.  Early this week, there were 4 BLUE-WINGED TEAL, 2 WOOD DUCKS, 1 NORTHERN SHOVELER, GREAT EGRET, SORA, 7 LEAST SANDPIPERS, 4 WILSON’S SNIPE, 5 LESSER YELLOWLEGS. A nice sighting given the noticeable decline in swallow numbers in recent years was the sight of 50 TREE SWALLOWS. Proving there is strength in numbers, many of the swallows were chasing a MERLIN which made an error by trespassing into their air space. This must be the first  first mid-July in history when one has been able to count species of birds instead of rows of corn at the Kaiser Crossroad flooded agricultural fields. Last Friday, 25 species present there included an AMERICAN WIGEON, 13 MALLARDS, NORTHERN SHOVELER, a PIED-BILLED GREBE, 10 GREAT EGRETS, one of which was watching over a flock of 28 CASPIAN TERNS. As at Huff’s Island, a trespassing MERLIN here wasn’t made welcome either and was seen being chased by swallows. Also present at Kaiser Crossroad were 8 KILLDEER, and one each of SOLITARY SANDPIPER and WILSON’S SNIPE. Other areas in the County were also reaping good numbers of wetland birds, namely the Lighthall Wetland along the County’s South Shore IBA. During a survey conducted on Tuesday, some 30 species were tallied, among them GREEN-WINGED TEAL, WOOD DUCKS, LEAST BITTERN, an amazing 24 MARSH WRENS and a roosting flock of 60 TREE SWALLOWS. Also seen there were COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, SWAMP SPARROWS and COMMON GALLINULE. A COMMON GALLINULE was also sitting pretty in Consecon Lake beside the Millennium Trail causeway yesterday where at least 2 WILLOW FLYCATCHERS were calling and a distant SCARLET TANAGER. CASPIAN TERNS, GREEN HERON, COMMON LOONS, BLACK TERNS, 15 WARBLING VIREOS, 20 BARN SWALLOWS, INDIGO BUNTING and 4 EASTERN KINGBIRDS were among the almost 40 species checked off during our 1 km trek to the site. Oh – almost forgot – at least 350 MUTE SWANS congregated in the section of Consecon Lake west of the trail. I don’t know, we stopped counting at 275 and they just kept floating into view, so we took what we had and added a few variables and unknowns and decided our figure would be a conservative 350. By comparison, the Hamilton Wetland west of Demorestville has been disappointing with only a handful of GREAT EGRETS present most days, perhaps a yellowlegs, or two, although a REDHEAD  did show up on the 18th. South Bay this week had COMMON LOON, SPOTTED SANDPIPER, RED-TAILED HAWK, and BELTED KINGFISHER. Along Snider Road off Victoria Road in the west part of the County, BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, RED-EYED VIREO, 2 GRAY CATBIRDS, 3 FIELD SPARROWS and 2 YELLOW WARBLERS were birds of note on the 18th, while north of Wellington, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, CEDAR WAXWING, 7 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS, PILEATED WOODPECKER and RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER were species noted just north of Wilson Road. As of mid-week, hay fields along Jackson`s Falls Road had not been harvested, translating into a flock of happy BOBOLINKS this week, 30 of them. Miscellaneous sightings through the week included a BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO seen at the start of the Woodland Trail near the Main Gate parking lot at Sandbanks Park, 22 CHIMNEY SWIFTS entering chimneys in Picton one evening, and a GRAY CATBIRD on Black Road who knows a good thing when he sees it – an offering of grape jelly at a residence there west of Demorestville.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
If you have never before seen a LEAST BITTERN, this week would have been the perfect week to take a shot at it at the H.R. Frink Centre north of Belleville. Two LEAST BITTERNS perched on the boardwalk railings for four consecutive days during the week. Also present at the conservation area were 2 VIRGINIA RAILS, ALDER FLYCATCHER, 2 MARSH WRENS, WOOD THRUSH, and OVENBIRD. Three EASTERN BLUEBIRDS  were at Tremur Lake this week, and another was at the Black Bear Ridge Golf Course nest boxes along Highway 37.  VESPER SPARROW and INDIGO BUNTING  were seen at Bronk Road and Harmony Road, and 2 GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS were at Bronk Road hydro wires site. A WILSON’S SNIPE and 6 GREAT BLUE HERONS were sighted at the Harmony Road Wetland. At the Lion`s Park in Belleville, 2 BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONS have been seen this past week. Birds of note at Foxboro this week were GRAY CATBIRD, CEDAR WAXWING, BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, and INDIGO BUNTING.  Over at Twelve O`Clock Point at Carrying Place, a LEAST BITTERN was seen in flight across marsh on south side of the Murray Canal, and 3 GREAT EGRETS, a GREEN HERON, 22 CASPIAN TERNS, MERLIN and a VEERY also put in appearances this week.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
Two days ago, 3 LOGGERHEAD SHRIKES were seen on Nugent Road, and 16 BLACK TERNS and 9 COMMON LOONS were at at Camden Lake. Wednesday, a NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD showed up along County Road 11 (Bridge Street) just east of Deseronto Road, and at Camden Lake on Wednesday, five COMMON LOONS including 2 juveniles and four 4 CASPIAN TERNS were highlights. At the Napanee Limestone Plains IBA, AMERICAN KESTREL, LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE, RED-EYED VIREO, and 7 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS were noteworthy sightings on the 19th. while at Sheffield Conservation Area yesterday, a COMMON LOON was seen, along with 14 RED-EYED VIREOS, EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, VEERY, 2 GRAY CATBIRDS, 8 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, 2 CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLERS, 6 EASTERN TOWHEES and a SCARLET TANAGER. Over at the Amherstview Sewage Lagoons on Wednesday, noteworthy sightings there included 2 GADWALL, PIED-BILLED GREBE, RED-TAILED HAWK, MARSH WREN, GRAY CATBIRD, AMERICAN REDSTART, 6 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Cobourg Harbour last Friday produced 2 SANDERLINGS as the shorebird migration gets into full swing for another fall season. Also present were 25 CASPIAN TERNS, 5 COMMON TERNS, and a GREAT BLACK-BACKED GULL. While I have never found Ferris Provincial Park at Campbellford to be a prime birding location, it can produce a few nice birds. During the week SCARLET TANAGER, EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, RED-EYED VIREO, OVENBIRD, EASTERN TOWHEES, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, and INDIGO BUNTING were observed. At Presquìle Park, 3 BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONS  were seen in the area of the Parkway, and last Sunday, a RED-SHOULDERED HAWK, a moulting bird - maybe first summer to adult – was spotted flying north over the Y junction which was a bit unusual. The tail had banding similar to  an adult but the wings were in moult, although the crescent was visible. Beach 3 has become a nice little lagoon attractive to migrating shorebirds. Through the week, SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, 3 KILLDEER, 4 LEAST SANDPIPERS, 3 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS, 1 SOLITARY SANDPIPER, 3 GREATER YELLOWLEGS, and 20 LESSER YELLOWLEGS were among the shorebirds present, in addition to 2000 RING-BILLED GULLS, 8 COMMON TERNS, RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER, 20 RED-EYED VIREOS, 5 NORTHERN WATERTHRUSHES, and 9 ORCHARD ORIOLES (2 family groups together). On July 17th, 2 each of STILT SANDPIPER (still present on 19th) and SANDERLING, 2 LEAST, 1 PECTORAL, 37 LESSER and 1 GREATER YELLOWLEGS, 2 WILSON’S PHALAROPES were tallied. Also 55 CASPIAN TERNS.
 
 

Saturday, July 08 to Friday, July 14:

HASTINGS COUNTY
Four GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS were present this past week at the Springbrook Grasslands along the Trans Canada Trail where other species of interest encountered included UPLAND SANDPIPER, WILSON’S SNIPE, YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, AMERICAN KESTREL, CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER, OVENBIRD, NASHVILLE WARBLER, 6 FIELD SPARROWS, 3 SAVANNAH SPARROWS, 4 EASTERN TOWHEES and SCARLET TANAGER. So, no lack of birds at this location despite the time of the year when bird activity is normally at a low ebb. At the Madoc Sewage Lagoons, birds of interest seen there this past week were COMMON GALLINULE, MARSH WREN and COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, all seen on the 12th.  Not much at the Harmony Road Wetland, and 6 GREAT BLUE HERONS, BARN SWALLOW, SWAMP SPARROW and COMMON YELLOWTHROAT was the best that location could do. Twelve O'clock Point at Carrying Place always seems to attract some good species and often some good numbers in the area of the jetties at the east end of the Murray Canal. Present mid-week were 2 each of GREAT EGRET and GREEN HERON, BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON, 16 CASPIAN TERNS, 2 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS, GRAY CATBIRD and MARSH WREN. Also a GRAY CATBIRD in central Foxboro with other noteworthy sightings being CEDAR WAXWING, CHIMNEY SWIFT, GREEN HERON and RED-EYED VIREO. On Elmwood Drive, a VEERY was seen on the 11th.  
 
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Flooded conditions along Huff’s Island Road have been attracting some traffic this past week where the start of the fall migration of shorebirds was well underway. Starting the procession were 13 LESSER YELLOWLEGS in a flooded field on July 10th, and right on time too according to their average arrival date. Also on time were 20 LEAST SANDPIPERS and even a STILT SANDPIPER. Also present were 13 GREAT EGRETS and 8 BLUE-WINGED TEAL. A SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER  seen there by another birder and 4 were seen on the 11th, also VIRGINIA RAIL. However, at North Beach the only shorebird present this past week were the celebrated PIPING PLOVERS which have been having a tough go of it. On July 8th there were two parent birds, but only 2 chicks. There had been 4 chicks, but one got snatched by a gull, and the other disappeared mysteriously. Hanging right in there though at Hilltop Road is the CHUCK-WILL’S-WIDOW that was still calling this week on Tuesday night, although it is still likely around. In accompaniment have been up to 4 EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILLS and an EASTERN SCREECH-OWL, and before darkness falls, WHITE-THROATED SPARROW and BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO. The latter species’ counterpart, the YELLOW-BILLED  species was seen in a backyard on Glenora Road across from Glenora Marine on the 7th. Miscellaneous species seen during the week included an EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILL north of Potter Road at Demorestville on the 11th, 4 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS on Black Road, and an UPLAND SANDPIPER  today at the junction of County Road 4 and Highway 62 (Bengill Rd.). 
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
A very long 90 minutes at the Menzel Centrennial Provincial Nature Reserve early Saturday morning where mosquitoes and deer flies were so aggressive and ravenous that an angry, raging black bear would have spelled sweet relief, two of us managed  27 species, the most noteworthy being 2 YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS, a PINE WARBLER, RUFFED GROUSE, 3 VEERY, and 1 WOOD THRUSH. Meanwhile, on the property’s west side, on Daley Road, another birder did much better with 44 species, coming up with BROAD-WINGED HAWK, 5 VEERY, 9 OVENBIRDS, WOOD THRUSH, 2 NORTHERN WATERTHRUSHES, 3 NASHVILLE WARBLERS, 6 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, 2 MAGNOLIA WARBLERS, 5 BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS, and 2 SCARLET TANAGERS, just to name a few of the highlights. Down at Springside Park along Napanee’s riverfront, almost 20 species were noted this week – 10 CHIMNEY SWIFTS, MALLARDS, GREAT BLUE HERON, SPOTTED SANDPIPER, just to name a few. Moscow Road had an EASTERN BLUEBIRD early in the week, but the Moscow Marsh featured a GREEN HERON, LEAST BITTERN, MARSH WREN, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, SWAMP SPARROW, WOOD DUCK and COMMON GALLINULE. On the 13th, the Napanee Limestone Plain IBA produced some of the earlier shorebird migrants including GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS and LEAST SANDPIPERS.  A few days earlier, a SOLITARY SANDPIPER made an appearance while other miscellaneous species in the area included PILEATED WOODPECKER, AMERICAN KESTREL, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, GRASSHOPPER SPARROW (3), two WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS and a VESPER SPARROW. North of Newburgh, on Nugent Road, a LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE was seen. More shorebirds showing up, this time at the Amherstview Sewage Lagoons with LESSER YELLOWLEGS and LEAST SANDPIPER being recorded. Also seen there, PIED-BILLED GREBE, WOOD DUCK, AMERICAN WIGEON and GADWALL. Four GADWALL over on Amherst Island on the 10th as well as AMERICAN KESTREL and GRASSHOPPER SPARROW among its 32 species seen that day.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
The recent DICKCISSEL sighting north of the Castleton area likely has been responsible for the sudden birding interest in rural roads in that region. However, other species have shown up such as several species of sparrow, namely, GRASSHOPPER, FIELD, VESPER, SAVANNAH and, of course, SONG SPARROW, with ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK and INDIGO BUNTING also thrown into the mix. Nearby, on the Barr Property (Nature Conservancy of Canada), the Dunbar Road area, just west of Jakobi Road where the DICKCISSEL had been seen, an amazing checklist of birds for this time of year this week with no fewer than 50 RED-EYED VIREOS being tallied, along with 10 VEERIES, 8 PINE WARBLERS, 30 SONG SPARROWS, and other noteworthy sightings being 4 INDIGO BUNTINGS, 2 SCARLET TANAGERS, 2 GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS. Not far away, at Peter’s Woods, north of Centreton, birds seen there on the 8th were RED-EYED VIREO, VEERY, OVENBIRD and INDIGO BUNTING. Cobourg Harbour this past week has had up to 65 BONAPARTE’S GULLS, 2 LITTLE GULLS, 300 RING-BILLED GULLS, a third summer GREAT BLACK-BACKED GULL, 45 CASPIAN TERNS, and 5 COMMON TERNS. No detailed checklists from Presqu’ile Park this week.
 

 


Saturday, July 01 to Friday, July 07:

HASTINGS COUNTY
Ever since the first TRUMPETER SWANS were re-introduced to our region, seeing that introduction transfer into successful breeding for our area has always been a thrill. A pair of TRUMPETER SWANS with their 4 cygnets were photographed July 2nd on a pond along the Trans Canada Trail off Highway 62, north of Ivanhoe. Not so welcome due to their invasive characteristics, usurping available nesting habitat from native waterfowl species has been the MUTE SWAN whose numbers have exploded in recent years. Twelve o’clock Point at Carrying Place, known for its high numbers of this species, hosted 84 on July 1st. Atkins Road shows little sign of slowing down appreciably in its appeal to local nesters, and the popular viewing area on the east side of Belleville, north of Elmwood Drive and Airport Road, continued this week to offer RED-TAILED HAWK, with other highlights being maximums of 4 VESPER SPARROWS, 4 SPOTTED SANDPIPERS, and 3 INDIGO BUNTINGS. The East Bayshore Trail which has become an extension of the Bay of Quinte in places, continues to produce MUTE SWANS, MALLARDS, DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS and CASPIAN TERNS in areas normally walked by hikers but now affected by high lake levels, as well as WARBLING VIREOS and YELLOW WARBLERS showing up in adjacent shrubs and trees.  The H.R. Frink Centre on Thrasher Road, 9 km north of Belleville had COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET, RED-EYED VIREO, NORTHERN FLICKER and 3 EASTERN KINGBIRDS on Monday, and a GREAT EGRET and 3 SCARLET TANAGERS were seen on Wednesday this week. Moving north again to the Trans Canada Trail area, the Springbrook Grasslands this past week has had up to 3 UPLAND SANDPIPERS, 1 LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE and 4 GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS this week, and a GRASSHOPPER SPARROW and UPLAND SANDPIPER  were seen again today. East of Roslin on Moneymore Road, a BROAD-WINGED HAWK was seen on Monday.
 
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
No indication that the CHUCK-WILL`S –WIDOW is about to let up on his singing any time soon. It was calling out its name last night at 10:00 p.m., accompanied by 5 EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILLS. The CHUCK-WILL`S-WIDOW was also heard Tuesday night, and as many as 6 EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILLS have been tallied this week at this popular birding destination along the South Shore Important Bird Area. The two North Beach PIPING PLOVERS have now morphed into 6, with the successful hatching of the four eggs and were first noted scurrying about yesterday. The young have been seen foraging on the paved road within barriers, and have the instinct to flee for cover when danger (Herring Gulls) approach.  Up to 60 BONAPARTE`S GULLS have been at North Beach Provincial Park this week.  While drier days have prevailed this past week, there are still plenty of flooded agricultural fields where birds tend to congregate. One major field is on Huff`s Island Road where 10 GREAT EGRETS were seen last Sunday, and 2 BLUE-WINGED TEAL. On Tuesday, 29 species of birds were tallied along Huff`s Island Road, among them 30 GREEN-WINGED TEAL, 2 BLUE-WINGED TEAL, and 2 AMERICAN BITTERNS. Another bittern was encountered the same day walking unconcerned across the road near Highway 62. A LESSER YELLOWLEGS – perhaps the first to mark the southern passage of this species in its `fall `migration in the County, turned up at the Hamilton Wetland west of Demorestville on July 3rd, somewhat early for this species. Three days later, there was a NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD there. Visitation is picking up at this wetland a bit with 23 species noted, but there have been few ducks except for MALLARDS HOODED MERGANSERS and WOOD DUCKS. On the Millennium Trail causeway over Consecon Lake yesterday, 13 BLACK TERNS  were nice to see, 110 MUTE SWANS not so much. A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER  was spotted along Hubb`s Creek Road on July 3rd. On the same day, a guided bird walk along the Sprague/Monkman Trail with over a dozen in attendance resulted in 38 species being found, among them GRASSHOPPER SPARROW, 2 CLAY-COLORED SPARROWS, OVENBIRD, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, WOOD THRUSH, GRAY CATBIRD, CEDAR WAXWING, several WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS, EASTERN TOWHEE, and both GREEN and GREAT BLUE HERON.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
The resident PRAIRIE WARBLERS  are still showing themselves well at Sheffield Conservation Area, south of Kaladar. A male and a female were there on Monday, and a PINE WARBLER a day earlier. Up to 18 BLACK TERNS can be seen at Camden Lake where the provincial wildlife area also has a PIED-BILLED GREBE. On the Cataraqui Trail, west of Yarker, good birds seen there on Tuesday were BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, YELLOW BELLIED SAPSUCKER, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, 16 HOUSE WRENS, CEDAR WAXWINGS, CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER, OVENBIRD, BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER, INDIGO BUNTING and ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS. A maximum of 5 GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS have been seen on the Napanee Limestone Plain IBA along with SAVANNAH SPARROWS, WILSON`S SNIPE and, yesterday, BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, VEERY, 2 OVENBIRDS, CLAY-COLORED SPARROW and SCARLET TANAGER. Six LOGGERHEAD SHRIKES and an UPLAND SANDPIPER today on Rattie Road.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
The big news in Northumberland County was the sighting of a male DICKCISSEL singing in a hayfield north of Castleton July 5th.  The bird was on Jakobi Road, just north of Moore Road in a hayfield on the west side where the power lines crossed the road. One local birder tried for it the following day, but was unable to locate it, and there have been no reports since. Just west of there on Dunbar Road, July 05, YELLOW-THROATED VIREO, and 2 GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS.   Two more GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS on Pratt Road. A few of the highlights in Presquìle Park this week have been BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON, YELLOW-RUMPED and PINE WARBLERS, 6 MARSH WRENS and 12 WOOD DUCKS  on the 2nd, and on the 3rd, there was a somewhat early LESSER YELLOWLEGS, and six warbler species – BLACK-AND-WHITE, NASHVILLE, YELLOW, BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS, as well as COMMON YELLOWTHROAT and AMERICAN REDSTART. SCARLET TANAGER and INDIGO BUNTING  were also seen in the Park. Out on the Parkway leading to the Park entrance, BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON, GREEN HERON, GREAT EGRET, MARSH WREN, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT and ORCHARD ORIOLE. Up to 15 COMMON GALLINULES, 6 MARSH WRENS and 12 WOOD DUCKS . A LEAST BITTERN has been seen off and on all week. The Presqu’ile Park Bird Report by Fred Helleiner for the week of June 30-July 06 has been uploaded to the NatureStuff website and can be found by CLICKING HERE.
 
The Quinte Area Bird Report will be updated on Friday, July 14.
 
 

FRIDAY, JUNE 30:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
A few miscellaneous scattered sightings around the County today. Two GREAT EGRETS in the Mountain View area – one in the flooded field along Highway 62 just nprth of Union Road (Mountain View), and the other in a flooded agricultural field along Huff’s Island Road. At one point today, the latter location had 3 GREAT EGRETS and lots of CANADA GEESE and other waterfowl. Huff’s Island Road also had EASTERN KINGBIRDS, BOBOLINKS, NORTHERN FLICKERS, and both TREE and BARN SWALLOWS. On Highway 62, just south of Rossmore, a drenched RED-TAILED HAWK caught in the morning rain that seemed uninterested in the two birders who stopped to view it more closely. This hawk was standing on one leg, a habit not uncommon with perching hawks which do this while resting or roosting, perhaps to prevent leg fatigue or simply to be more comfortable. And, good news from the corner of Brewer’s Road and Hilltop Road – the long calling CHUCK-WILL’S WIDOW was heard calling away at 9:30 p.m. last night.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
No bird sightings today from Lennox and Addington County.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
No bird sightings today from Northumberland County. 
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Other than a GRAY CATBIRD and 2 CHIMNEY SWIFTS being sighted at Foxboro, nothing too startling to report from Hastings County today. One sighting that was made several days ago, which the observer was inquiring about, was a number of MUTE SWANS swimming by the south end of Dufferin Street in Trenton. He wanted to know why most of them had one leg and foot hoisted into the air as they glided by. Was it some kind of friendly acknowledgement? Apparently, it is quite common for swans to do this. The theory is that it might play a role in helping to regulate the body temperature of the bird. The legs and feet are the only part of the swan not covered in feathers so the blood vessels are in closer contact with the air. The large surface area of the webbed foot makes it easier for heat to be transferred from the body to the air, cooling the swan. This heat exchange could also work the other way, with the feet absorbing heat from the air to warm the bird.  Think I may try it myself some time! So, if you should see me swimming by one day......
 
This evening’s Bird Report is the last full Report to be posted until at least the autumn migration gets in full swing. Until then, only a point form weekly summary, probably uploaded on Friday evenings recapping only a sprinkling of the more significant sightings of the week. 
 

 


THURSDAY, JUNE 29:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
An interesting “heard” this morning on Black Road was the sound of tiny feet dancing on the roof of a residence. A quick check revealed some 250 EUROPEAN STARLINGS. Also seen at this location were GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, 3 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS, and a female WILD TURKEY hunkered down in a field trying to wait out the rain. Robinson Cove at Big Island still flooded with the boat launch beneath the surface somewhere and the entire parking area flooded with several inches of water. Still, the birds come and seen enjoying the conditions were numerous gulls, 3 KILLDEER, a SPOTTED SANDPIPER, MALLARDS, GREAT BLUE HERON and 2 BLUE-WINGED TEAL (file photo by Barry Kant of Brighton), and also present were YELLOW WARBLERS and a SONG SPARROW. Several birders have been trying for the 2 DICKCISSEL that were first spotted last Sunday along Melville Road, but without success. Now that the hay in the neighbouring fields is being cut, there is likely little chance of them turning up again, at least at that location. Today, other birds were there though including a GRASSHOPPER SPARROW, SAVANNAH SPARROW and an AMERICAN KESTREL. At North Beach Provincial Park, the pair of PIPING PLOVERS were present again today – the female on her nest, while the male stretched out and relaxed on the beach. Four hundred RING-BILLED GULLS were around so it is good that the plover nest is being monitored. SPOTTED SANDPIPER, 3 YELLOW WARBLERS, 4 KILLDEER and a ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK also noted at North Beach today. Elsewhere today, there was a VESPER SPARROW at the junction of Melville Road and County Road 1 (Schoharie Road).
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
An EASTERN BLUEBIRD and a GRASSHOPPER SPARROW were highpoints at the Moscow Marsh, north of Colebrook in the Camden Lake area. In the Napanee Limestone Plain IBA area, some good birds among the 40 species tallied. Seen were GREEN HERON, 5 WILSON’S SNIPES, a YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, 2 AMERICAN KESTRELS, and two each of BROWN THRASHER and GRAY CATBIRD.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Lots of interest in the H.R Frink Centre on Thrasher Road, off Highway 37, north of Belleville. Visits from three different birders, at 7:00 a.m., 8:00 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Two of the birders in the morning both found three LEAST BITTERNS. In each case, all three were calling at some point. Two males called from he marsh on the north side of the boardwalk near the west end (close to a wood duck box) and a female was seen flying west on the south side of the boardwalk. A high of 3 VIRGINIA RAILS (file photo by Derek Dafoe of Marmora) and up to 15 SWAMP SPARROWS  were heard, and two among the three birding groups found COMMON YELLOWTHROATS. Other good birds seen at the Frink Centre included 3 WOOD THRUSHES, one VEERY, a NORTHERN CARDINAL, 2 YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS, 3 OVENBIRDS, 2 GREAT BLUE HERONS and one person managed to score  a SCARLET TANAGER.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Nothing to report from Northumberland County this evening. The Presqu’ile Bird Report for the past week by Fred Helleiner has been uploaded to the NatureStuff website and can be found by CLICKING HERE.
 
Tomorrow evening’s Bird Report will be the last Evening Report until later in the season, resuming in either August or September when the fall migration gets rolling again. Until then, only a point form weekly summary, probably uploaded on Friday evenings recapping only a sprinkling of the more significant sightings of the week.
 

 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28:

HASTINGS COUNTY
The bulk of this evening's Report is from Hastings County. Starting way up north, at Baptiste Lake in the Bancroft area, some interesting species seen there, including 5 warbler species – 4 OVENBIRDS, BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER, NASHVILLE WARBLER, PINE WARBLER and 2 BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS. Also present, WOOD THRUSH, 2 WINTER WRENS, 3 YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS and a PILEATED WOODPECKER. Moving south to Springbrook Road, location of the Springbrook Grasslands, the single LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE  was seen again, seemingly holding down territory as it was seen chasing a crow away. GRASSHOPPER SPARROW, NORTHERN FLICKER, EASTERN KINGBIRD and two each of FIELD SPARROW and EASTERN MEADOWLARK. Over on Highway 37, across the Moira River from the Vanderwater Conservation Area, Flatrock Road offered SCARLET TANAGER, VEERY, WOOD THRUSH, BROWN THRASHER, and singles of OVENBIRD, GRASSHOPPER SPARROW, CLAY-COLORED SPARROW, FIELD SPARROW, SCARLET TANAGER and INDIGO BUNTING. At Stoco Fen in the Tweed area, a YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER  was seen and 8 NORTHERN WATERTHRUSHES. Even more abundant than the waterthrushes were the WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS – 12 of them, not an uncommon number for that area. NASHVILLE WARBLER, WINTER WREN, VEERY and both WILLOW and ALDER FLYCATCHERS were present too, along with a VIRGINIA RAIL. On Cary Road on the north side of Deroche Lake, a BROAD-WINGED HAWK was seen as well as 2 RED-EYED VIREOS, 2 EASTERN BLUEBIRDS, a VEERY, 4 OVENBIRDS, and a SCARLET TANAGER. An overzealous LEAST FLYCATCHER today in the Barry Heights area of Trenton had a negative attitude toward any and all AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES that came to visit a feeder there, chasing them away one by one as they appeared. However, it seemed fine with the rest of the clients – NORTHERN CARDINALS, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS, even the HAIRY and DOWNY WOODPECKERS with young. The disturbing behaviour was offset though by the pair of RED-HEADED WOODPECKER that had been absent since being first seen together three weeks earlier. BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONS are seen daily flying up and down the Trent River. They seem to hang out on the east side of the river below Number 1 Dam in the many large willows along the shoreline.
 
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
A few scattered sightings around the County today included 5 GREAT EGRETS on Huff’s Island Road, a RED-TAILED HAWK at Mountain View, and 2 UPLAND SANDPIPERS perched on a utility pole at the south end of Doxsee Road.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
An ORCHARD ORIOLE and a BALTIMORE ORIOLE  were highlights today along the Presqu’ile Parkway, just outside the Park proper. Others were NORTHERN FLICKER, WARBLING VIREO, EASTERN KINGBIRD and YELLOW WARBLER.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
Nothing from Lennox and Addington today.
 
 
Friday evening’s Bird Report will be the last Evening Report until later in the season, resuming in either August or September when the fall migration gets rolling again. Until then, only a point form weekly summary, probably uploaded on Friday evenings recapping only a sprinkling of the more significant sightings of the week.
 
 

TUESDAY, JUNE 27:

No Bird Report today.

 


MONDAY, JUNE 26:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
The BOBOLINK was just one of 11 bird species confirmed or suspected of breeding during today’s South Shore IBA Breeding Evidence Survey. Others, beyond the expected species, included AMERICAN REDSTART, CLIFF SWALLOW, GRAY CATBIRD, GRASSHOPPER SPARROW and INDIGO BUNTING. There were actually 6 GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS  found and among some of the other noteworthy sightings were OVENBIRD, 10 CEDAR WAXWINGS, 4 EASTERN TOWHEES and 5 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS. During the same survey, but along Simpson Road, 34 species were found, and among those tallied, some of the breeding birds found there were NASHVILLE WARBLER and BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO. Other good finds were PIED-BILLED GREBE and COMMON GALLINULE, MERLIN, 2 WILLOW FLYCATCHERS, 2 MARSH WRENS, 2 WOOD THRUSHES, 3 BROWN THRASHERS and an OVENBIRD. No further sightings of the DICKCISSEL that was found yesterday along Melville Road near Consecon Lake. However, at least one birder did make the effort to search for it, and although the habitat was excellent for birds, there was no sign of the DICKCISSEL, neither have there been any additional entries of the species on eBird. Scattered sightings around the County today included SANDHILL CRANES at the Hamilton Wetland, 8 GREAT EGRETS and GREAT BLUE HERON on Huff’s Island Road, and two each of EASTERN KINGBIRD and EASTERN MEADOWLARK on Doxsee Road.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
As always, birders were in an active mood today in Hastings County. The excellent habitat at the O’Hara Mill Homestead and Conservation Area a couple kilometres north of Madoc produced 24 species alone in just a few minutes in the more open areas of the property. However, there are at least six kilometres of trails, all of them interconnecting with each other. The trails offer great birding and have expanded in recent years from the original two short trails to the current maze, thanks to the O’Hara Volunteers Association. Seen there today were 6 warbler species – OVENBIRD, BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER, NASHVILLE WARBLER, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, PINE WARBLER and BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER. Other good sightings were GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, WARBLING and RED-EYED VIREOS, LEAST FLYCATCHER and 3 CEDAR WAXWINGS. Acclaimed – by at least one person who birds there regularly, as the most enjoyable hotspot in Hastings County to trespass -  The Madoc Sewage Lagoons lived up to its reputation by producing 18 species of birds today. Among them were WOOD DUCKS, COMMON GALLINULE, BELTED KINGFISHER, MARSH WREN, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT and SWAMP SPARROW. At the H.R. Frink Centre, near Plainfield, MERLIN, GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET, WOOD THRUSH, OVENBIRDS and GRAY CATBIRD  were highlights there today. North of Ivanhoe, ALDER FLYCATCHER and BLUE-WINGED WARBLER  were highlights along Twiddy Road, 500 metres south of Wood Road. West of there, at the Springbrook Grasslands beside the Trans Canada Trail, the first sighting of the LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE in six weeks that had been a regular during the spring, was made. The bird was spotted from Springbrook Road southwest of the possible nest site where it had been seen earlier. A group of four UPLAND SANDPIPERS were singing and making periodic flights on the north side of Springbrook Road, a species known to breed in the grasslands. Two GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS, EASTERN TOWHEE, 3 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS, BROWN THRASHER and 2 WILSON’S SNIPES also good sightings for this popular area.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
Two locations in Lennox and Addington that were explored today. The Moscow Marsh, north of Yarker and Colebrook came up with 8 MARSH WRENS. WOOD DUCK, GREAT BLUE HERON, 4 BLACK TERNS, GRAY CATBIRD and BROWN THRASHER were other good sightings there. Just a stone's throw away from there, the Camden Lake Provincial Wildlife Area produced 6 BLACK TERNS (an active colony of them out in the lake), 4 COMMON LOONS, 2 EASTERN PHOEBES, 2 GRAY CATBIRDS, 3 CEDAR WAXWINGS, and singles of SWAMP SPARROW, BROWN THRASHER, WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH, WARBLING VIREO and EASTERN KINGBIRD. Wilton Creek today at Big Creek Road had AMERICAN KESTREL, BARN SWALLOWS, YELLOW WARBLERS, and SAVANNAH SPARROWS.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
No significant sightings from Northumberland County today.


SUNDAY, JUNE 25:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Some birding today in the Ameliasburgh/Hillier area resulted in some good finds – really good finds! The * DICKCISSEL * incursion into eastern Ontario has reached Prince Edward County with the sighting of two today along Melville Road. When sighted the female was following the male and both landed in shrubs on the north side of the road, just east of Civic Address #349. Melville Road can be accessed from Highway 33 by following Lakeside Drive at Consecon and driving east to Melville Road. Turn left and follow Melville Road around the corner and look for #349. Now, I won’t have to drive all the way to Fowler’s Corners in the Peterborough area to see one that is currently hanging out there. Hard to beat the DICKCISSEL sighting but other good birds seen along that stretch of road included WILSON’S SNIPE, EASTERN KINGBIRD, 2 GRAY CATBIRDS, FIELD SPARROW and EASTERN TOWHEE. On nearby Carnrike Road, AMERICAN REDSTART, GRASSHOPPER SPARROW, 5 SAVANNAH SPARROWS and SCARLET TANAGER  were seen. Another GRASSHOPPER SPARROW was seen just north of there along Salem Road, along with UPLAND SANDPIPER, BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, WOOD THRUSH, and 2 INDIGO BUNTINGS. Thirty-three species were tallied today at the upper end of Victoria Road and Snider Road, with a NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH singing persistently and close to the edge of Victoria Road where a creek reaches the road on wet days. Also heard were OVENBIRD, WOOD THRUSH, BROWN THRASHER, GRASSHOPPER SPARROW, and WILSON’S SNIPE. Some good stuff there today in the Hillier/Ameliasburgh section of the County. At Beaver Meadow Conservation Area, one birder recommends waterproof boots as the wetland this year is really, most sincerely wet due to higher water levels and persistent rain. Birds seen were BELTED KINGFISHER, GREEN HERON, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, BALTIMORE ORIOLE, BLACK TERNS and AMERICAN REDSTARTS.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
At a farm site north of Sandhurst, some good birds there including high totals of a few species, namely. 205 RED-WINGED BLACKBIRDS. In the same family, an incredible 43 BOBOLINKS were counted comprising 29 males and the rest females. The 37 SONG SPARROWS  can be attributed to the excellent fence row habitat here. Four PILEATED WOODPECKERS, 4 GRAY CATBIRDS, 6 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, 10 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS, also good numbers. At the Gray’s Project Wetland, south of Napanee, 2 BARN SWALLOWS, 4 KILLDEER, 3 SPOTTED SANDPIPERS, 2 MALLARDS, 1 BELTED KINGFISHER and an INDIGO BUNTING.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
No bird reports today from Presqu’ile Park; however, a family of HOODED MERGANSERS  turned up at the Brighton Constructed Wetland along County Road 64. Lots of cattail growth this year which makes observation from outside the fence difficult. Entry to the wetland and its walkways is possible by obtaining a permit from the Municipality of Brighton. The permit is only $5.00 for the season and can be obtained by CLICKING HERE. Very early this morning – and, I mean EARLY, shortly after midnight, 2 EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILLS were heard calling on Goodrich Road, south of Codrington. Just west of there, on Pinewood School Road, another EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILL  was heard as well as a COMMON NIGHTHAWK.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Once again, a fair bit of birding activity in Hastings County. Atkins Road, still producing, with 34 species tallied today. Among the highlights were 3 INDIGO BUNTINGS, 3 VESPER SPARROWS, 2 WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS, 1 RED-TAILED HAWK, 3 SPOTTED SANDPIPERS, 5 HORNED LARKS, and singles of WOOD THRUSH, EASTERN TOWHEE, GRAY CATBIRD and BROWN THRASHER. The H.R.  Frink Centre came up with YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, NORTHERN FLICKER, ALDER FLYCATCHER, 4 SWAMP SPARROWS and 2 GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLETS. A neighbourhood walk through central Foxboro by a resident birder resulted in 26 species being found, among them, NORTHERN FLICKER, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, EASTERN KINGBIRD, 4 CEDAR WAXWINGS and singles of COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, FIELD SPARROW, SONG SPARROW, GRAY CATBIRD and BROWN THRASHER. At the College Street rail line in Belleville, some good habitat there produced NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW, BROWN THRASHER, GRAY CATBIRD, 6 YELLOW WARBLERS, FIELD SPARROW and EASTERN MEADOWLARK.
 

SATURDAY, JUNE 24:

HASTINGS COUNTY
After being halted by steady rain yesterday, birders returned to the field with a vengeance today. At the H.R. Frink Centre on Thrasher Road, north of Belleville, roughly 46 species of birds were tallied by two different observers, one arriving at 6:30 a.m., another two hours later. YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS were nesting and three different nest sites were found. Species typical of the wetland included AMERICAN BITTERN, GREAT BLUE HERON, VIRGINIA RAIL, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, SWAMP SPARROW and, of course, RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD. In addition to 4 NORTHERN WATERTHRUSHES and 3 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, other warbler species seen and heard in the adjacent wooded areas were 4 OVENBIRDS, a YELLOW WARBLER, and one each of NASHVILLE and BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER. Other good finds at the Frink Centre were  WINTER WREN, RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER, LEAST FLYCATCHER, WOOD THRUSH, and SCARLET TANAGER. Twelve GREAT BLUE HERONS made up the bulk of the few sightings at the Harmony Road Wetland, along with 6 BARN SWALLOWS and 2 CLIFF SWALLOWS. At the Black Bear Ridge Golf Course on Highway 37 north of Belleville, some good sightings there including EASTERN BLUEBIRD, EASTERN KINGBIRD, and GRASSHOPPER SPARROW, the latter species also turning up today along Bronk Road where 5 were seen in two different locations. Also at Bronk Road and Harmony Road, UPLAND SANDPIPER, SAVANNAH SPARROW, AMERICAN KESTREL and VESPER SPARROW were noteworthy sightings. Atkins Road on the east side of Belleville, directly north of Elmwood Drive and Airport Parkway hasn’t considered retirement just yet; 41 species were tallied there today including WOOD DUCK, RED-TAILED HAWK, WOOD THRUSH, GRAY CATBIRD, INDIGO BUNTING, a WHITE-THROATED SPARROW and 3 VESPER SPARROWS. One birder drove slowly along Mudcat Road past the Thurlow Wildlife Management Area and chalked up 17 species by ear, among the more noteworthy “heards” being 3 EASTERN WOOD-PEWEES, LEAST FLYCATCHER, VEERY, WOOD THRUSH, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, AMERICAN REDSTART, and 6 SWAMP SPARROWS. At the far south end of Dufferin Street in Trenton today – 3 BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONS, GRAY CATBIRD, YELLOW WARBLER, SONG SPARROW and COMMON GRACKLE. And, finally – at the Stanley Park Wetland near the north end of Haig Road, in Belleville, both a SORA and 2 VIRGINIA RAILS  were found.  
 
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
In Prince Edward County today, Fish Lake Road early this morning produced 5 YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS, SONG SPARROWS, GREAT BLUE HERONS, BALTIMORE ORIOLES, NORTHERN FLICKER, YELLOW WARBLERS and COMMON YELLOWTHROATS. Two SANDHILL CRANES were present again this morning at the Hamilton Wetland. North of Wellington along County Road 2, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, BALTIMORE ORIOLE, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, CEDAR WAXWING, 3 WARBLING VIREOS and a RED-EYED VIREO were noteworthy. Two GRAY CATBIRDS were observed carrying food to nestlings. On the Sprague/Monkman Trail west of 23 Sprague Road, Big Island, EASTERN MEADOWLARKS, BOBOLINKS, and SAVANNAH SPARROWS were noted, with the majority of them buried in a  forest of Bromegrass hay. An EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILL continues to call most mornings before light.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
Near Puzzle Lake Park, north of Tamworth, 2 OVENBIRDS, a COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, YELLOW WARBLER and CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER represented the warbler family today. EASTERN TOWHEE, GRAY CATBIRD, YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER and a YELLOW-THROATED VIREO were nice additions to the day’s checklist.  At Sheffield Conservation Area, 11 kilometres south of Kaladar, an explosion of flying and running RUFFED GROUSE startled one birder. All 10 grouse were roosting in a pine tree. The PRAIRIE WARBLERS  were there once again – this time, three of them where this species is known to nest. No other warblers were noted, but also found early this morning among the 25 species during the over three hours spent there were VEERY (3), two EASTERN WOOD-PEWEES, BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, 3 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS, and 4 RED-EYED VIREOS. At Napanee, a COMMON NIGHTHAWK was seen over Richmond Blvd. at the north end of town.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Goodrich-Loomis Conservation Area, 15 kilometres north of Brighton, had 24 species of birds noted today, among them a MOURNING WARBLER and a GRASSHOPPER SPARROW, along with INDIGO BUNTING, CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER, 2 EASTERN BLUEBIRDS, 3 OVENBIRDS and 2 RED-EYED VIREOS. At the bridge that crosses Cold Creek, an ALDER FLYCATCHER was singing. Down at Presqu’ile Park, which opened for business again two days ago, the Parkway had a few interesting birds among 51 species seen. The morning started with a female HOODED MERGANSER flying south over the Park marsh. Four BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONS, 2 AMERICAN BITTERNS, a PIED-BILLED GREBE, 4 COMMON LOONS, GREAT EGRET , 2 GREEN HERONS and a VIRGINIA RAIL added spice to the mix, along with a MERLIN, WILLOW FLYCATCHER, MARSH WREN, ORCHARD ORIOLE, PILEATED WOODPECKER, and 5 CASPIAN TERNS making it on the checklist too. It pays to bird early in the morning and not dally as there are birds to be found, and Presqu’ile Park is an excellent location to chalk up a good list.
 
 

FRIDAY, JUNE 23:

NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Not surprisingly, few birders were out in today’s weather. What few sightings did come in from elsewhere in the reporting area will be held over and used in tomorrow’s Report. Cobourg Harbour continues to draw interest from the birding community. Today there was a massive flock of RING-BILLED GULLS , estimated to number at least 3,000 birds. By comparison, HERRING GULLS numbered barely 100. However, also present were 200 BONAPARTE’S GULLS and with them was a first summer LITTLE GULL, A fourth summer LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL, a first summer GLAUCOUS GULL, and 2 GREAT BLACK-BACKED GULLS. Also present, 90 CASPIAN TERNS and four COMMON TERNS. Along the Presqu’ile Parkway today, 29 species showed themselves including three members of the Heron family – GREAT BLUE HERON, GREAT EGRET and GREEN HERON. Others were MERLIN, CEDAR WAXWINGS, COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, SWAMP SPARROWS and BALTIMORE ORIOLES. 

 


THURSDAY, JUNE 22:

 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Some good sightings on the west side of Loyalist/Wallbridge Road in Quinte West today, namely Potter’s Creek Conservation Area (formerly Quinte Conservation Area) which included a couple sightings of AMERICAN REDSTART. Two were seen on the main property north of the Quinte Conservation office where other noteworthy species included SCARLET TANAGER, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, and a family of GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLETS. Other species were COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, BALTIMORE ORIOLE, EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE and GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER. The 346-acre property extends south of Highway 2 and is a popular picnic area. The two properties are joined by a aqueduct under the highway that once served as an underpass for cattle when this property was a farm originally settled by the Stephen Blanchard in 1815, and later, by Ernie Potter, hence the name of the property and the creek. In the picnic area on the south side of Highway 2, two more AMERICAN REDSTARTS  were found as well as CEDAR WAXWINGS, OSPREY (nesting), and both WARBLING and RED-EYED VIREOS. At the Stanley Park Marsh at the end of Haig Road in Belleville, interesting birds found there today were VIRGINIA RAIL, NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT and NORTHERN CARDINAL. A return visit to Dutch Girl Lane off Baptist Church Road, south of Stirling, produced 2 YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS, 3 NORTHERN FLICKERS, 2 EASTERN WOOD-PEWEES, 2 RED-EYED VIREOS, a VEERY, 2 SCARLET TANAGERS, 1 BALTIMORE ORIOLE and 3 AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES. On the east side of Belleville, Airport Parkway yielded 15 or so species including 7 CEDAR WAXWINGS, a YELLOW WARBLER and 1 VESPER SPARROW.
 
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Nothing from Prince Edward County, except an unsuccessful attempt was made last night by one party to track down the CHUCK-WILL’S-WIDOW on Hilltop Road. However, they did not go home empty handed as 2 EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILLS  were heard, as well as WILSON’S SNIPE, WOOD THRUSH, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, WHITE-THROATED SPARROW and EASTERN TOWHEE. Of course, the Great Canadian Birdathon in which many took part to raise funds for the Prince Edward Point Bird Observatory has been over for some weeks. Congratulations to master bander at the Prince Edward Point Bird Observatory, David Okines, whose Birdathon team managed to find 162 species of birds in a 24-hour period. Coming in second place were the Sprague’s Pipits (minus one pipit !), comprising Mike Runtz, Mike Burge Kathy Felkar and Don Sutherland, who rustled up 155 species in the 24 hour period. The Sprague’s Pipits were named after the species by the same name, a bird of the west. Always interesting to see the names other birding teams have chosen for their groups. Southern Quebec has the “Red-eyed Wearios” (anyone birding for a straight 24 hours can appreciate the message in that name). Other teams elsewhere in the country include “Three Hens and a Rooster”, and the “Two-footed Boobies”. The Great Canadian Birdathon was first established as the Baillie Birdathon in 1976. The Baillie name was chosen to honour James L. Baillie; Assistant Curator in the Department of Ornithology at the Royal Ontario Museum for nearly 50 years. Baillie’s knowledge of birds was unsurpassed, and he willingly shared his knowledge with thousands of people. Also established in 1976 was The James L. Baillie Memorial Fund. The fund is administered by Bird Studies Canada, and supports Canadian bird research and conservation efforts. In 2015, to reflect the growth and national scope of the Birdathon, a new name The Great Canadian Birdathon was adopted. The link to James Baillie will be maintained through the James L. Baillie Memorial Fund which receives a portion of the funds raised through the Birdathon each year.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
North of Kaladar today, the sighting of two PRAIRIE WARBLERS  was just one of 15 species of birds seen today along County Road 41. Also seen were 2 BROWN THRASHERS, 1 NASHVILLE WARBLER, and a CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER. North of Millhaven, at Link Mills, good species seen there today included WILLOW and LEAST FLYCATCHERS, 6 CEDAR WAXWINGS, WILSON’S SNIPE and a ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
At Cobourg Harbour, there are still 150 BONAPARTE’S GULLS lingering, mostly on the piers within the harbour, and about 30 on the beach. A continuing LITTLE GULL was also there along with 500 RING-BILLED GULLS and 2 CASPIAN TERNS. Meanwhile, at Presqu’ile Park, the waiting is over; the Park is once again open to the public, but Beaches 1-3 are still closed due to high water as is Calf Pasture Point. And, at least one birder was right there to resume birding in areas that could be accessed. Spending time at the Lighthouse area, 22 species were tallied including 4 CASPIAN TERNS and a COMMON TERN. Nothing too spectacular to greet returning birders – just the usual species that might be expected at this time of the year. Some of those that stood out in the checklist for the day were NORTHERN FLICKER, WARBLING VIREO, HOUSE WREN, GRAY CATBIRD, NORTHERN CARDINAL and BALTIMORE ORIOLE – just one of each species. Others around the lighthouse area were 3 YELLOW WARBLERS, and the same number of TREE SWALLOWS. 

 


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
If there are BOBOLINKS with nests in the 40 acres of hay fields west of Sprague Road, I`m not seeing them! The Brome Grass in the fields where they are supposedly nesting this summer is shoulder height now. Never in the decades when we owned that farm have I seen hay so lush as it is this year, matting down in places whenever there is rain. However, both BOBOLINKS and EASTERN MEADOWLARKS are well established in those fields, somewhere, as they constantly explode out of the fields as I am following the trails that I have groomed around the property – four kilometres in total according to Google Earth.  Also along the Sprague/Monkman Trail today were several COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, ALDER FLYCATCHERS, EASTERN TOWHEES and SAVANNAH SPARROWS. No sign of the MERLINS  though. Along Crowes Road in an area the County locals refer to as Greenbush, VEERY, UPLAND SANDPIPER, GRAY CATBIRD, 2 SONG SPARROWS and a SCARLET TANAGER were sighted. At Beaver Meadow Conservation Area late yesterday afternoon, at least a half dozen BLACK TERNS  were flying over the wetland, and also seen were 2 PIED-BILLED GREBES, and singles of  COMMON GALLINULE, BELTED KINGFISHER, RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER and EASTERN KINGBIRD. On Old Milford Road today, lots of birds in full song with 2 GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS proclaiming territory, as well as  4 FIELD SPARROWS, 8 SAVANNAH SPARROWS and 13 SONG SPARROWS. Thirteen BOBOLINKS  were counted, and the 15 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS  was considered an underestimated number. Other good birds seen along that stretch of road included EASTERN KINGBIRD, 2 GRAY CATBIRDS, 3 BROWN THRASHERS and 2 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS. Other noteworthy species seen down that way were YELLOW WARBLER and COMMON YELLOWTHROAT on Scott`s Mill Road, and 2 RED-BELLIED WOODPECKERS at the Mount Tabor Playhouse in the village of Milford.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
Nothing reported today from Lennox and Addington County.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Presqu'ile Park is scheduled to re-open tomorrow, but not all areas of the Park will be open as some are still flooded due to high lake levels. Calf Pasture, Marsh Boardwalk, Owen Point Trail and the Beaches all have significant water over them. Roads to these areas are gated but if you walk in you can see what the 100 year flood has done to these areas. For example the Calf Pasture Parking lot is full of small fish and frogs and a hunting mecca for herons. As the water levels continue to recede over the next few weeks, some of these now closed areas will gradually re-open as conditions dictate. The only bird news from Northumberland County today was the continuing juvenile BRANT on Cobourg Harbour`s east pier, among CASPIAN TERNS, lingering BONAPARTE`S GULLS and other gull species.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
A maybe/perhaps/possible CAROLINA WREN along Dutch Girl Lane off Baptist Church Road remains unconfirmed. One birder walked along Dutch Girl Lane for about 30 metres today in an easterly direction and after hearing the song, recorded it, and then played it back. What responded both vocally and visually was not a CAROLINA WREN, but a male BALTIMORE ORIOLE – actually a pair of them, the male producing a near perfect imitation of the Carolina`s song. Was this the mystery bird or is there actually a CAROLINA WREN back in there somewhere? This is not the first time that a birder has been caught off guard with the song of a BALTIMORE ORIOLE. Some years ago while leading bird walks at Prince Edward Point during the Birding Festival, a "Carolina Wren" heard by many in the Point Traverse Woods, which eventually showed itself and was actually a male BALTIMORE ORIOLE. It had fooled me initially, and had fooled even two professional birders. Back at Baptist Church Road and Dutch Girl Lane,  other species were there all of which were more obliging and singing their appointed songs. Among them were VEERY, WOOD THRUSH, OVENBIRD, CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER, BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER, SCARLET TANAGER, RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER, and INDIGO BUNTING. Elsewhere on Baptist Church Road, 3 HORNED LARKS  were seen, and down near the marsh and sand pit at the S-turn, RUFFED GROUSE, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, OVENBIRD and WINTER WREN were checked off. In Foxboro, BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES fledged yesterday from a nest box. A HOUSE WREN lost no time assuming ownership, removed all the old nesting material (mostly animal hair and bits of pink insulation) and adding their trademark course sticks. I am surprised the HOUSE WRENS actually bothered to wait for the chickadees to leave, given their reputation for evicting the rightful occupants by destroying the eggs, nestlings and the nest itself.

 


TUESDAY, JUNE 20:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Although North Beach Provincial Park doesn't open for the operating season until Friday, volunteer guardians of the pair of PIPING PLOVERS nesting there this summer, first observed there in late May, had a tour of the nest site yesterday. Since first observed last month, a bit of information has surfaced on the birds’ background. The male with the orange flag is from Michigan, while the female that is currently setting on eggs was banded at Wasaga Beach. There seems to be no record that PIPING PLOVERS  ever nested historically at North Beach, but there is anecdotal evidence from the nearby Weller`s Bay National Wildlife Area (Bald Head Peninsula). It would seem though that the species historically was quite well established in the County due to the sand beaches and was one of the few known breeding stations in the province. The "secluded" beaches at Sandbanks were likely very conducive to nesting PIPING PLOVERS before human intrusion rendered the area unattractive to the species. The North Beach nesting is probably the first breeding of the species since the 1930s and 1940s. Annual human visitation to the "secluded" beaches at Sandbanks today is about 700,000 !  Also appearing in the North Beach area yesterday was a  NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD at the main entrance to the park. While on the topic of provincial parks, a PINE WARBLER  was singing at the Visitor Centre yesterday and an ORCHARD ORIOLE  was doing likewise at the Main Gate to the Park, and another along the road to the park dump site. Some good sightings at Rednersville today including GREEN HERON, BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, and singles and pairs and groups of NORTHERN FLICKERS feeding on grubs on a lawn after this morning`s heavy rain. Last night along Huff`s Island Road, 28 species were found between Highway 62 and the end of Huff`s Island Road. In the well known flooded field just before the causeway that crosses the marsh, 2 WOOD DUCKS and 7 GREAT EGRETS  were noted with other good sightings being 2 BLACK TERNS and a NORTHERN HARRIER. A flooded field along Highway 62, north of Union Road at Mountain View continues to attract a few species and last evening a dozen MALLARDS  were present as well as 2 KILLDEER and  GREAT BLUE HERON. Once the rain stopped this morning, birding was good in the Consecon area with lots of song and activity. A highlight was at a private residence near the end of North Stinson Block Road which was a real oasis. This is where the BLUE GROSBEAK was was sighted earlier this year. Two species of Oriole have nests and both were feeding young. The ORCHARD ORIOLE nest is about fifteen feet high well hidden under an outer downward hanging branch of a Spruce. Fifty feet away, also about fifteen feet up, the BALTIMORE ORIOLE has a nest in a deciduous tree. The yard here also had five pairs of HOUSE WREN, singing LEAST FLYCATCHER and an INDIGO BUNTING. The horse barn here has BARN SWALLOW nests and the used nest of an EASTERN PHOEBE while the house gable has a lone CLIFF SWALLOW nest. Along Edward Drive what sounded like the churr of a RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER and then a flock of them (!) turned out to be a family of RACCOONS with young. Nearby a SNAPPING TURTLE was laying eggs on the side of the road. The Millennium Trail going over Lake Consecon had a few things of interest. There were ten BLACK TERNS flying about in the west end of the lake indicating nesting again this year. Two MINK crossed the causeway and these are probably the same that have a burrow in the side and was seen robbing a nest last year. Also noted were two MONARCH BUTTERFLIES (earlier than usual arrivals throughout the County this spring) but viewed with mixed reaction was a SONG SPARROW feeding a begging fat fledged BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
No bird reports from Lennox and Addington today, except for a few from Strathcona, namely, EASTERN PHOEBE, GRAY CATBIRD, YELLOW WARBLER, 3 VESPER SPARROWS and a NORTHERN CARDINAL.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Forty species were noted today in the open water and marshy habitat along the Presqu`ile Parkway. LEAST BITTERN, AMERICAN BITTERN, GREAT BLUE HERON, 3 GREAT EGRETS and 2 BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONS represented the heron and egret family admirably. HOODED MERGANSER, 2 WOOD DUCKS, 4 CASPIAN TERNS, BELTED KINGFISHER, EASTERN KINGBIRD, 2 MARSH WRENS and an ORCHARD ORIOLE were among other highlights.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
There is a loud CAROLINA WREN singing at the intersection of Dutch Girl Lane and Baptist Church Road, just south of Stirling. It was first heard a week ago. A GREEN HERON was seen in flight today at the Thurlow Wildlife Management Area. In central Foxboro, 2 CHIMNEY SWIFTS, 2 HOUSE WRENS, and a GRAY CATBIRD were noted today along with 8 CEDAR WAXWINGS, one of them carrying nesting material.
 

MONDAY, JUNE 19:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
It’s not every late June I get to mention a LONG-TAILED DUCK in this Bird Report! A well marked male was spotted yesterday in Lake Ontario along the Lakeview Trail at Sandbanks Park’s West Point. However, this is not the first time one of these Arctic breeders has been seen in the Quinte region during the summer months. We have three early June records – not terribly unusual as this species does nest late in the year, and there would still be time for individuals to hightail it out of here to begin nesting along the Hudson Bay shoreline where it breeds in Ontario. An individual I saw June 27, 2001 near Main Duck Island clearly could not fly as it made no attempt to do so as our boat neared it. Similarly, one I came upon while kayaking in South Bay July 31, 2000, pattered the surface of the water for some distance but could not get airborne. And a female reported from Wellington on August 04, 2008 was certainly quite late. Getting back to Sandbanks, other species seen along the Lakeview Trail included 2 MALLARDS (same ones since mid-May?), CASPIAN TERN, EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, GRAY CATBIRD and BROWN THRASHER were all good sightings. In Greater Allisonville, BALTIMORE ORIOLE, HOUSE FINCHES and RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER were highlights there. A RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER  was producing alarm notes this afternoon at 2418 Victoria Road in Ameliasburgh, later flying off. Good news for those waiting for something of interest to finally show up at the Hamilton Wetland, west of Demorestville. At 8:00 a.m., a single GREAT EGRET flew along the wetland and coming in right behind it was a SANDHILL CRANE, and two more appeared very shortly. Along Potter Road today, NORTHERN FLICKER, SONG SPARROWS, BALTIMORE ORIOLES, NORTHERN CARDINALS, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK and YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
The Napanee Limestone Plain Important Bird Area is always a popular destination at this time of the year, and today was no exception. Over 25 species observed there today included VESPER SPARROW, GRASSHOPPER SPARROW, 2 LOGGERHEAD SHRIKES, 2 EASTERN KINGBIRDS, AMERICAN KESTREL, 2 WILSON’S SNIPES, and a NORTHERN HARRIER. Added to the list by another observer was COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, WHITE-THROATED SPARROW and two each of  BOBOLINK and EASTERN MEADOWLARK. A bit north of Sheffield Conservation Area along County Road 41, COMMON LOON, SHARP-SHINNED HAWK, 2 COMMON NIGHTHAWKS, 2 EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILLS, a BLUE-HEADED VIREO, 2 VEERYS, NASHVILLE WARBLER, and SCARLET TANAGER were all noteworthy.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
With the temporary closure of Presqu’ile Park, areas north of Presqu’ile have been getting a workout in recent days. South of Codrington, along Goodrich Road and Sumach Lane, 26 species seen there included a few noteworthy species – GREEN HERON, ALDER FLYCATCHER, BLUE-WINGED WARBLER, AMERICAN REDSTART, EASTERN TOWHEE, 3 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS and an INDIGO BUNTING. North of Castleton today (north of Colborne), 2 SCARLET TANAGERS, 3 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS, INDIGO BUNTING, 2 MOURNING WARBLERS, a PINE WARBLER, 3 CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLERS and EASTERN KINGBIRD  were seen. Also found was a YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER nest containing young. Not far from Centreton which is a short distance west of Castleton, CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER, PINE WARBLER, 2 INDIGO BUNTINGS, GRASSHOPPER SPARROW, 2 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS, and a COMMON YELLOWTHROAT were all good finds. Some really good habitat in the Castleton area and beyond including Peter’s Woods and the Northumberland County Forest where I have guided interpretive hikes in the past.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Beginning in Central Foxboro – 4 EASTERN PHOEBES and singles of GRAY CATBIRD, SCARLET TANAGER and CEDAR WAXWING. In the Lonsdale area, near the corner of Blessington Road and Marysville Road, a GRASSHOPPER SPARROW  was seen there along with 2 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS. Not surprisingly, a GRASSHOPPER SPARROW made it onto a checklist at the Trans Canada Trail into the Springbrook Grassland. Two UPLAND SANDPIPERS were observed perched atop a dead tree, and also seen were BROWN THRASHER, 2 FIELD SPARROWS, 3 SAVANNAH SPARROWS and 4 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS.

 


SUNDAY, JUNE 18:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
At 6:20 a.m. this morning, 2 SCARLET TANAGERS  were among the highlights along Potter Road, just east of Demorestville. Six ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS and 3 INDIGO BUNTINGS added some colour to the scene that was punctuated with the flute-like notes from a WOOD THRUSH and the rich whistled refrains from 3 WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS. Other noteworthy species seen at this location were 2  NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOWS, 7 CEDAR WAXWINGS, 6 EASTERN TOWHEES and 2 GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHERS. Another highlight on Potter Road was an EASTERN WHIP–POOR-WILL calling loudly at 9:40 p.m. last night on the south side of the road near Fish Lake. A lone EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILL continues to call along Sprague Road at Big Island where it has been singing since June 7th.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Hastings County was uncharacteristically quiet today with the only sightings coming from Foxboro and area. Among the highlights were 2 CHIMNEY SWIFTS, GRAY CATBIRD, 2 CEDAR WAXWINGS, NORTHERN HARRIER and HOUSE FINCH.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
As regular Park visitors to Presqu’ile await the good news that the Park is once again open, and that should be fairly soon, birding continues to be enjoyed from its northern boundary along the Presqui’le Parkway and Presqu’ile Bay. Present today were 36 species comprising a BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON, GREAT EGRET, CASPIAN TERN, 3 ORCHARD ORIOLES, 2 BALTIMORE ORIOLES, RED-EYED and WARBLING VIREOS and 2 GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHERS. Along the Parkway, 2 BROWN THRASHERS  were watched as they fed from a mowed lawn and made frequent trips to a nest. Only 9 species at Cobourg Harbour today – 225 BONAPARTE’S GULLS, 475 RING-BILLED GULLS, 65 HERRING GULLS, 65 CANADA GEESE, and 20 CASPIAN TERNS representing those species with high numbers, while COMMON TERN, ROCK PIGEON and DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT  came in at only one a piece.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
Haven’t heard much from Napanee’s Springside Park lately except for a GREAT BLUE HERON that was enjoying a bumper day of fishing recently. Probably the same GREAT BLUE HERON was observed today along the Napanee River at the Falls where 22 CANADA GEESE and 30 MALLARDS were also enjoying the bucolic setting. Nearby, RED-EYED VIREO,BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE, 4 SONG SPARROWS and 3 AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES  were among the 15 species of birds noted. At Wilton Creek in the Morven area, a TURKEY VULTURE was among species found, with others being OSPREY, 2 KILLDEER, BELTED KINGFISHER, 6 BARN SWALLOWS, a CEDAR WAXWING and a YELLOW WARBLER also noted. The Sparrow family was represented by two each of SONG and SAVANNAH.  At the Moscow Marsh, north of Yarker and Colebrook, both a male and a female LEAST BITTERN were seen yesterday, along with GRAY CATBIRD, BALTIMORE ORIOLE, BLACK TERN, WARBLING VIREO and 2 EASTERN KINGBIRDS.

 


SATURDAY, JUNE 17:

LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
On Camden Lake today, there were 6 COMMON LOONS seen during the day. While the duo fished near some floating bogs, twice they accidentally flushed 2 LEAST BITTERNS.  Descendants of the BLACK TERNS that dive-bombed my kayaking party when we were on Camden Lake some years ago, were in the same spot today – 16 of them. Other good species in between nibbles were NORTHERN HARRIER, 2 BELTED KINGFISHERS, an  AMERICAN KESTREL, 2 EASTERN KINGBIRDS, 2 COMMON RAVENS, 6 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, and 9 YELLOW WARBLERS. The 18 MARSH WRENS encountered were considered a conservative count as Camden Lake is a known breeding area for this species. Mention of young birds and biting mosquitoes peppered the majority of sightings reports today. North of Newburgh at Nugent Road 5 LOGGERHEAD SHRIKES  were counted. One fledgling in the bunch was soliciting for donations of food. Four adults were visible at one time and one pair was busy copulating, preparing to make more little shrikes. Singles of AMERICAN KESTREL, NORTHERN HARRIER, and SAVANNAH SPARROW also seen at this location. Meanwhile at the Menzel Centennial Provincial Nature Reserve north of Deseronto, one birder at 7:00 a.m. described how much of his three hours and 20 minutes were spent swaddled in a mosquito net hammock/hide at Mud Lake after walking 2.4 kilometres to get there. His reward was the sighting of 5 COMMON LOONS (no juveniles noted), a YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, 2 VEERYS, a WOOD THRUSH, and two each of ALDER and GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER. The nature reserve, known for its warbler population, did not disappoint. Those heard and seen included OVENBIRD, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER, NASHVILLE WARBLER, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, YELLOW WARBLER, CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER, BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER and CANADA WARBLER, in numbers ranging from singles to as many as four. Two PRAIRIE WARBLERS showed themselves again at Sheffield Conservation Area, 35 minutes north of Napanee, along with PILEATED WOODPECKER, PINE WARBLER, SCARLET TANAGER and ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Nothing reported from Northumberland County today.
 
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Forty-three species were tallied at South Bay today, one of them, a male WHITE-WINGED SCOTER who has decided due to medical reasons to spend the summer in Prince Edward County, instead of returning to its summer breeding grounds in the Hudson Bay Lowlands. The reason? Damaged wing. Two BLACK-BILLED CUCKOOS, GRAY CATBIRD, CEDAR WAXWINGS, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, INDIGO BUNTING and BALTIMORE ORIOLE. North of Wellington on County Road 2, just north of Wilson Road, an UPLAND SANDPIPER was a highlight, while others seen included GREAT BLUE HERON, WOOD THRUSH, 2 GRAY CATBIRDS, 6 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS, BALTIMORE ORIOLE, and six CEDAR WAXWINGS. The latter species seems to be turning up this week at various locations in small numbers. Four were enjoying lunch today on Serviceberries at 23 Sprague Road, Big Island. At Wellington’s Rotary Beach today, YELLOW WARBLER, BARN SWALLOW, 2 WARBLING VIREOS and a CASPIAN TERN were noteworthy as were 3 CHIMNEY SWIFTS heard twittering over the Bloomfield Town Hall. And, at Hilltop Road along the South Shore IBA, the CHUCK-WILL’S-WIDOW returned for an evening encore last night and was heard at 9:20 p.m. along with 2 EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILLS. Also in concert before the evening performance were 2 BROWN THRASHERS, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, 2 WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS and one GRASSHOPPER SPARROW. At Big Island’s Robinson Cove, good birds seen in the area of the flooded boat launch and dock were GREAT BLUE HERON, YELLOW WARBLERS, AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES, SONG and CHIPPING SPARROWS, CASPIAN TERNS, KILLDEER, EASTERN KINGBIRDS, and BARN, TREE and BANK SWALLOW.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Lots going on in the County of Hastings today. At the H.R. Frink Centre, NORTHERN CARDINAL, NORTHERN FLICKER, GREAT BLUE HERON, SONG and SWAMP SPARROWS, EASTERN KINGBIRDS and NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH. On Moneymore Road running east from the Roslin area, songs of both BLUE-WINGED and GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER eventually translated into a single bird being responsible – a BREWSTER’S WARBLER (hybrid). An even better sighting, this time on Cold Water Road in the Marlbank area was a CERULEAN WARBLER, its distinctive song heard three times although the elusive species that prefers an upper canopy, could not be seen. Nineteen species of birds were seen in this area which is mostly new growth secondary forest, but with some older/taller secondary growth. Here, a BROAD-WINGED HAWK was heard, and also checked off were YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, RED-EYED VIREO, OVENBIRD, AMERICAN REDSTART, CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER, PINE WARBLER, and SCARLET TANAGER. Back on Moneymore Road – actually, Cheese Factory Trail which runs between Moneymore Road south to Naphan Road, two separate birders – one at 10:00 a.m. and another at noon, both came up with impressive lists. Seen and heard were YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, VEERY, WOOD THRUSH, CEDAR WAXWINGS, GOLDEN-WINGED and BLUE-WINGED WARBLER, AMERICAN REDSTART, 4 SCARLET TANAGERS, 2 INDIGO BUNTINGS, WOOD THRUSH and EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE.

 


FRIDAY, JUNE 16:

LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
Seems to be a lot of attention toward Sheffield Conservation Area, 11 km south of Kaladar these days. Could be the Prickly Pear Cactus that grows there in an undisclosed location, or it could be the PRAIRIE WARBLERS that are seen there regularly every year at this time. And, they were there again today – 2 of them – along with PINE, CHESTNUT-SIDED and YELLOW WARBLERS, and an AMERICAN REDSTART. Three VEERYS were also found. Not much going on at Springside Park in Napanee except for a GREAT BLUE HERON fishing for a meal and according to the birders who saw it, this heron was exceptionally good at his craft, scoring several Yellow Perch and a Pumpkinseed Sunfish. Good entertainment.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
At Cobourg Harbour, a single BRANT continues, and also present today were 2 RUDDY TURNSTONES. In the gull family, 240 RING-BILLED GULLS, 25 HERRING GULLS, 10 BONAPARTE’S GULLS and a single GREAT BLACK-BACKED GULL. Nineteen CASPIAN TERNS and a couple COMMON TERNS also among the dozen or so species of birds present. North of Colborne, at the Lone Pine Sanctuary, 5 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS and 11 BOBOLINKS were nice finds while others included PIED-BILLED GREBE, PILEATED WOODPECKER, MARSH WREN, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK and 2 WOOD DUCKS.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Once again, Hastings County was in an active mood today. The Harmony Road Wetland had 3 CHIMNEY SWIFTS and 14 GREAT BLUE HERONS (family groups) at the heronry there. GRAY CATBIRD and two CEDAR WAXWINGS appeared in Central Foxboro today, and a HOODED MERGANSER  was in the Moira River in the area of Lion’s Park off Station Street. A couple new areas reporting in today – both on the Tyendinaga Reserve. At Hungry Bay and marsh at Beach Road, south of Shannonville, 35 species were found, among them VIRGINIA RAIL, 4 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, and two each of MARSH WREN and  SWAMP SPARROW. Other good birds seen along this stretch of road were 4 BALTIMORE ORIOLES, 1 AMERICAN REDSTART, 3 RED-EYED VIREOS, 2 WARBLING VIREOS, and 3 EASTERN WOOD-PEWEES. One each of RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER and YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER  also made it on the checklist today. Down near the First Nations Air Service, the end of Hickory Road off Airport Road yielded 36 species. Some good finds there including a couple GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS, 2 GREAT EGRETS and a WILLOW FLYCATCHER. Also on the list were WOOD DUCK, AMERICAN KESTREL, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK and BALTIMORE ORIOLE.
 
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
A GREAT EGRET was seen in a flooded backyard on Gardenville Road, one of several seen along there today and along County Road 64 between Carrying Place and Brighton. Once again, Hilltop Road’s CHUCK-WILL’S-WIDOW  did not disappoint. It was heard at 2:50 a.m. this morning with 2 EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILLS providing a backdrop. A WHITE-THROATED SPARROW  was also up early and singing. A walk along Snider Road near the upper end of Victoria Road yielded some good species today, namely, ALDER FLYCATCHER, WARBLING VIREO, 3 GRAY CATBIRDS, 1 BROWN THRASHER, a BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER, GRASSHOPPER SPARROW, as well as CHIPPING, FIELD, SONG, and SAVANNAH SPARROWS, and also in the same family – 2 EASTERN TOWHEES. East of Demorestville along Potter Road, 37 species were noted early this morning, among them, YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, PILEATED WOODPECKER, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, 2 WOOD THRUSHES, 2 OVENBIRDS, BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER, CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER, 9 EASTERN TOWHEES, 15 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS, and 3 INDIGO BUNTINGS. Also seen was a SCARLET TANAGER carrying food, confirming its nesting status in the County for a species we typically see only during spring migration. An interesting “hearing” this evening on Big Island was an AMERICAN BITTERN soundly pumping away enthusiastically from the middle of a field of Brome Grass hay less than 100 metres west of 23 Sprague Road, its convulsive notes echoing off one of our outbuildings! It was still going strong as this Report was being uploaded at 8:30 p.m.

 


THURSDAY, JUNE 15:

HASTINGS COUNTY
Watching a WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH, whether at a feeder or in its natural habitat, is always a treat; seeing two is a bonus. But, seeing six at one time is just short of exhilarating. That’s how many were cavorting around today on a black walnut tree in a Foxboro backyard, no doubt a family group out for some exercise. Other good birds here and in the general Foxboro area today were 2 GREEN HERONS in flight, 1 CHIMNEY SWIFT, RED-EYED VIREO, 3 GRAY CATBIRDS and a BALTIMORE ORIOLE. Best sighting (actually a hearing) was a GRASSHOPPER SPARROW singing its dry insect-like wheezes along a cemetery fence line. An hour and a bit more during a return visit by a Belleville birder to the Dutch Lane site south of Stirling, added a few other species not seen on yesterday’s visit. Most notable was a RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER, and also appearing were 2 WOOD THRUSHES and a couple CEDAR WAXWINGS. The two PINE WARBLERS, found yesterday, were still present.  
 
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Neither wind nor rain, nor day nor night will keep a CHICK-WILL’S-WIDOW  from uttering his refrain. Well, maybe daylight, but daylight was just over the horizon at 3:20 a.m. when the CHUCK-WILL’S-WIDOW started his repetitious and somewhat monotonous chorus, this time, some distance from the road near the junction of Hilltop Road and Brewer’s Road along the South Shore IBA. Three EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILLS also offering their somewhat similar songs. At Prince Edward Point today, 3 ALDER FLYCATCHERS, 2 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, 4 YELLOW WARBLERS and 6 SONG SPARROWS. Things are slowing down. NORTHERN HARRIERS today at Black Road and Big Island. Along the Sprague/Monkman Trail west of Sprague Road, nesting MERLINS continue as well as EASTERN MEADOWLARKS and BOBOLINKS, although it’s hard to tell as the Brome Grass in the hay fields is as high as an elephant’s eye – well, a little more than waist high anyway. SAVANNAH SPARROWS and 2 or 3 CLAY-COLORED SPARROWS presumably nesting and ALDER FLYCATCHERS aplenty. In the Big Island Marsh beside South Big Island Road, GREAT BLUE HERON, CANADA GEESE, MUTE SWAN, AMERICAN BITTERN and COMMON YELLOWTHROAT. Today, a LEAST BITTERN was heard calling and lots of MARSH WRENS and SWAMP SPARROWS.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILLS also featured prominently in the Kaladar area when no fewer than 21 were heard calling  last night. Six were calling at the Jack Pine Barrens Conservation Reserve west of Kaladar, another nine were calling north of Kaladar, four were singing south of Kaladar along County Road 41 and two were calling at the Sheffield Conservation Area. At Sheffield, some good birds seen there including 4 COMMON NIGHTHAWKS, a GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, 2 EASTERN TOWHEES and one each of VEERY and YELLOW-THROATED VIREO. Twenty species were tallied at the Napanee Limestone Plain IBA with some of the more noteworthy species being COMMON RAVEN, AMERICAN REDSTART and GRASSHOPPER SPARROW – one of each. On Amherst Island, more specifically, at the Martin Edwards Reserve at the east end of the island, 3 late SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS were spotted when they were flushed with some MALLARDS from a pond, ultimately circling and returning to the edge of the pond again. It’s not the latest date for this species in the Kingston region, but getting close to it. Other shorebird species were 2 WILSON’S PHALAROPES, 4 SPOTTED SANDPIPERS, 4 KILLDEER and an UPLAND SANDPIPER. Other good birds on the KFN owned property were 3 BLUE-WINGED TEAL, and a NORTHERN SHOVELER.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Along the Presqu’ile Parkway today, 7 GREAT EGRETS were a good sighting, one OSPREY, 4 CASPIAN TERNS, 3 WARBLING VIREOS, 2 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS and 12 CHIPPING SPARROWS. 



WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14:

 
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
The celebrated CHUCK-WILL’S-WIDOW was heard again late last night, calling from very near the road close to the west gate of the Miller Family Nature Reserve east of the junction of Brewer’s Road and Hilltop Road. This is the fifth consecutive year in which the CHUCK-WILL’S-WIDOW has turned up in the same location and we can only conclude that it is the same individual each time. The bird was banded in 2015.  Amazing how a bird so small as this can produce such an incredibly loud song. During last night’s Whip-poor-will survey across the South Shore IBA when this CHUCK-WILL’S-WIDOW  was heard calling, the survey team made 26 stops during which they counted 31 calling WHIP-POOR-WILLS. Team leader, Peter Fuller, commented that the wet conditions this spring doubtless contributed to frogs were calling from everywhere and at times it felt more like they were doing a Marsh Monitoring Survey than a Whip-poor-will survey making it more difficult to hear other bird species that were present. At Prince Edward Point today, a NASHVILLE WARBLER  was still around. Other good species seen included SHARP-SHINNED HAWK, 2 EASTERN PHOEBES, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER and 5 BARN SWALLOWS.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
No reports from Lennox and Addington at time of uploading this Report.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
A single BRANT  continues to loaf around with CANADA GEESE and hundreds of gulls at Cobourg Harbour. BONAPARTE’S GULLS  continue to hang out there and today’s count was 127 with most of them in three different groups on the docks and the southwest breakwall. On the beach itself were 2 LITTLE GULLS. Total count of RING-BILLED GULLS was 930, and of HERRING GULLS (mostly immatures), 126, with a first summer GREAT BLACK-BACKED GULL thrown in for good measure. Twelve CASPIAN TERNS  were also present today. In a Brighton, a leucistic AMERICAN ROBIN observed there a few days ago, is still being seen.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Birders today were in an active mood in Hastings County with several key locations visited. At the Potter’s Creek Conservation Area in Quinte West, highlights were EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, WARBLING VIREO, CEDAR WAXWING, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, YELLOW WARBLER, NORTHERN CARDINAL, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK and BALTIMORE ORIOLE. One area where I used to conduct the occasional interpretive Evening Hike, located along Baptist Church Road, is Dutch Girl Lane. Dutch Girl Lane eventually morphs into Dutch Girl Road and comes out at Highway 62. Along here is a hydro right of way where numerous wildflowers grow, and is the most southern location for Sweet Fern that I have found yet. But, bird species are impressive too since the “road” passes through a deciduous woods where today, 2 YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS, 5 EASTERN WOOD-PEWEES, a GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, 6 RED-EYED VIREOS and a ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK were found. Also detected were 4 warbler species – 2 PINE WARBLERS, and one each of OVENBIRD, AMERICAN REDSTART and BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER. At the Thurlow Wildlife Management Area along the Moira River near Plainfield, some good finds there including 3 VEERYS, 6 WARBLING VIREOS, 4 RED-EYED VIREOS, 4 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, a NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH and 3 YELLOW WARBLERS. On Egglelton Road, east of Stirling, a pair of EASTERN BLUEBIRDS was a highlight, with other birds seen being singles of GRAY CATBIRD, BROWN THRASHER, SAVANNAH SPARROW and NORTHERN CARDINAL, 2 FIELD SPARROWS and 7 SONG SPARROWS. Two LEAST BITTERNS were reported from the H.R. Frink Centre, while down in Trenton, a COMMON TERN was watched today as it scored a fish after a successful dive, then, as it was flying away, tossed the fish into the air twice to re-position the fish in its bill.

 


TUESDAY, JUNE 13:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
There is still water at Kaiser Crossroad where crops were likely in the ground and growing by now last year at this time. Enjoying the wet conditions yesterday 8 GREAT EGRETS at Kaiser Crossroad. In the Prince Edward Point area today, 31 species were tallied between Babylon Road and the Point proper. Among the highlights were 2 AMERICAN WOODCOCKS, 2 EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILLS, 6 RED-EYED VIREOS, 4 each of GRAY CATBIRD and BROWN THRASHER, 7 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, and 2 WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS. Last summer, a pair of BALD EAGLES nested successfully at an undisclosed location in the Bay of Quinte near Huff’s Island. The nesting was significant as it represented the first confirmed successful nest of this species in the County since the late 1940s when the species was all but wiped out by the effects of DDT. In fact, while the species is nesting at several locations not far north of here, they have been a bit slow in returning as a nesting species along the immediate north shore of Lake Ontario between Kingston and Toronto. This spring, the two BALD EAGLES have returned to last year’s nest and are actively nesting again for a second season.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
No bird sightings from Northumberland County today.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
The Napanee Limestone Plain IBA still doing very well with 62 species observed by one birder today. A RING-NECKED PHEASANT  was among them, as well as 3 LOGGERHEAD SHRIKES, a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW, and 12 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS, a few of the dozen involving fledged young. Three AMERICAN BITTERNS and a LEAST BITTERN also made it on the checklist, as did 3 VIRGINIA RAILS, 2 COMMON GALLINULES and 3 UPLAND SANDPIPERS, as well as an EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILL. A dozen BOBOLINKS, 7 SAVANNAH SPARROWS, a couple GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS and 4 LEAST FLYCATCHERS were other good sightings made in the Important Bird Area.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Hastings County was where it was at today with explorations to a variety of areas by different birders. Thirty-one species noted at the H.R. Frink Centre today. Among the highlights were 2 WOOD DUCKS, HOODED MERGANSER, AMERICAN BITTERN, LEAST BITTERN, 4 VIRGINIA RAILS, 2 WOOD THRUSHES and an OVENBIRD. The MERLIN was around the parking lots again today, strongly suggesting a nest nearby. At the Trans Canada Trail just north of Ivanhoe, some good sightings there as usual with a BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, ALDER FLYCATCHER, GRAY CATBIRD, SCARLET TANAGER and a BREWSTER’S WARBLER (hybrid) putting in their appearance along Twiddy Road, 500 metres south of Wood Road. Along the trail itself toward the Springbrook Grassland, 3 UPLAND SANDPIPERS, 6 GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS, AMERICAN KESTREL, BOBOLINK, EASTERN MEADOWLARKS, SAVANNAH SPARROWS and 6 FIELD SPARROWS, all species typical of grassland habitat. On Atkins Road on the east side of Belleville, still good birding to be had with 28 species present today. Among the good sightings were GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, RED-EYED VIREOS, AMERICAN REDSTART, 3 VESPER SPARROWS and 5 SAVANNAH SPARROWS. Scattered sightings elsewhere around Hastings County today included a VEERY on Elmwood Drive (east of Belleville), 2 GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLERS, NASHVILLE WARBLER and MAGNOLIA WARBLER along Naphan Road. BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONS are still being seen cruising back and forth along the Trenton shoreline at the foot of Dufferin Avenue, likely visiting feeding areas. They have been seen at least twice feeding at Bain Park across from CFB Trenton. On Cheese Factory Trail in the Moneymore Road area east of Roslin, some great sightings there including YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO and both BLUE-WINGED and GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLERS.

 


MONDAY, JUNE 12:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Commencing July 1st, if not earlier, the Quinte Area Bird Report will be taking some time off during the month of July. Reports will be restricted likely to just Hastings and Prince Edward County, and may be presented in point form just listing some of the more significant species seen, and might be posted only once a week. This may continue through August, depending on the volume of sightings, but will certainly resume in its regular daily format by September 1st. Today, just a handful of sightings, starting with Beaver Meadow where BELTED KINGFISHER, GREEN HERON, BLACK TERNS, COMMON GALLINULE, YELLOW WARBLER, CHIPPING SPARROW, PIED-BILLED GREBE and ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK. At Big Island's Robinson Cove the GREAT BLUE HERON was still there as well as KILLDEER and CASPIAN TERNS. At Sawguin Creek, at the junction of Highway 62 and County Road 28, a GREAT BLUE HERON was having a successful day. Other species there were EASTERN KINGBIRD, OSPREYS (nesting), DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT  and HOUSE FINCH. In the Wellington area at County Road 2, north of Wilson Road, some colourful species there including GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, 2 GRAY CATBIRDS, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, NORTHERN CARDINAL, BALTIMORE ORIOLE, AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES and 2 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS.
  
HASTINGS COUNTY
Interesting sighting at Walmart today on the north edge of Belleville where at least one pair – maybe more – RING-BILLED GULLS were seen nesting on the roof of the adjacent Jysk store there. At least one flightless juvenile chick was seen. There were some 150 RING-BILLED GULLS in total. Behind the Walmart Store, 5 CANADA GEESE, and a GREAT BLUE HERON, as well as a RED-TAILED HAWK that was seen harassing the gulls. In Foxboro, 2 GREEN HERONS in flight, 1 CHIMNEY SWIFT, a GRAY CATBIRD and one AMERICAN REDSTART were among the species seen there today
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Presqu’ile Park remains closed, of course, due to high lake levels, but still lots of good birding along the Parkway leading toward the Park. A few of the species present were MARSH WREN, BROWN THRASHER, 5 SWAMP SPARROWS, WARBLING VIREO and GREAT EGRET among the 25 species tallied. At 31 George Street on the north side of Brighton, a pair of GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHERS  are nesting in a nest box there – always a good backyard bird to have nesting. RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH, NORTHERN CARDINAL and RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD also nice backyard residents.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
Nothing from Lennox and Addington County today, but yesterday an evening visit to the Amherstview Sewage Lagoons produced 32 species. Noteworthy species were 2 WOOD DUCKS, 10 GADWALL, and a female BUFFLEHEAD still hanging around. Twelve KILLDEER and 4 SPOTTED SANDPIPERS represented the shorebird family with 10 each of NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED, TREE and BARN SWALLOWS being seen as well. AMERICAN REDSTART, FIELD SPARROW, EASTERN TOWHEE, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK and BALTIMORE ORIOLE  were other good species seen.

 


SUNDAY, JUNE 11:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
It was Bioblitz day at the Miller Family Nature Reserve along Hilltop Road in the County’s South Shore Important Bird Area. The event went from noon yesterday and concluded today at noon. Over 50 attended this event and professionals were on hand to assist in the identity of anything living – birds, mammals, herptiles, dragonflies, moths, butterflies, plants – you name it. The event started off with a bang when last night, all three members of the Goatsucker family (nightjars) provided a lively concert, including the southern CHUCK-WILL’S-WIDOW that was first reported in the same area the night of May 10th. This is the fifth year in which this southern species has been detected at this location. This morning at 4:40 a.m., it was still going strong as the bird was calling on the property south of the west gate. Two EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILLS  were also heard, and COMMON NIGHTHAWKS  were also noted. Birding hard time started at 5:30 a.m. with one birder finding 37 species, highlights being GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, 2 GRAY CATBIRDS, 8 BROWN THRASHERS, OVENBIRD, AMERICAN REDSTART, 8 WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS, and 15 SONG SPARROWS. My 9:00 a.m., 4 km+ bird hike around the trail loop found many of the same species, but also added EASTERN BLUEBIRD and OSPREY. Some birders just never rest. The 4:00 a.m. birder after finishing his stint at the Miller property, continued on down to Prince Edward Point where he wandered slowly around the net trails behind the Bird Observatory, coming up with 43 species. Highlights here were 4 GRAY CATBIRDS, 3 BROWN THRASHERS, 15 YELLOW WARBLERS, 3 NORTHERN CARDINALS, 2 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS and a BALTIMORE ORIOLE. Out in the Sandbanks Park area, 2 GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHERS, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, YELLOW WARBLER and CEDAR WAXWING in the Woodlands Campground. Not far away, on the Winn’s Drive causeway leading to Sheba’s Island, good birds there were 2 BLACK TERNS, a COMMON YELLOWTHROAT and 1 YELLOW WARBLER. The only other sighting to come in was a SCARLET TANAGER in flight at 2410 Victoria Road in Ameliasburgh.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Nothing from Hastings County today. Better luck tomorrow.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
Remember the LONG-NOSED GARS I mentioned that a Highway 2 resident saw spawning in his backyard west of Napanee? As of last evening, the reported 20 had expanded to 30, all splashing around in his flooded backyard.  The only thing birdwise to come in from Lennox and Addington were some sightings from the Napanee Limestone Plain IBA. Among the good finds were 2 AMERICAN KESTRELS, GRAY CATBIRD, an OVENBIRD, 1 FIELD SPARROW, 2 SAVANNAH SPARROWS and 6 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS. At Sheffield Conservation Area, south of Kaladar, YELLOW-THROATED VIREO, and BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER  were good species.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
In Northumberland County today, a couple of spots worth mentioning. Cobourg Harbour managed to restore our faith in it being able to produce good birds after an absence of a few of the key species that had drawn birders there from afar. Today a BRANT was seen, and there was a LESSER SCAUP near the boat launch, a returning FORSTER’S TERN, a GLAUCOUS GULL and a first year LITTLE GULL. Some 125 BONAPARTE’S GULLS, all of them first summer birds, were still hanging about, a rather late date for such a number. At a location between Centreton and Castleton, 36 species were tallied today, among the more noteworthy being 4 YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS, a MERLIN, BLUE-HEADED VIREO, 13 RED-EYED VIREOS, WINTER WREN, VEERY, INDIGO BUNTING, SCARLET TANAGER, and among the 8 warbler species – an impressive 9 MOURNING WARBLERS. North of Cobourg, at the Peter’s Woods Provincial Nature Reserve area today, SHARP-SHINNED HAWK, RED-TAILED HAWK, 2 AMERICAN KESTRELS, INDIGO BUNTING, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS and YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER. North of Cobourg, the Balls Mill Conservation Area had BELTED KINGFISHER, GREEN HERON, GREAT BLUE HERON and SPOTTED SANDPIPER.
 

SATURDAY, JUNE 10:

LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
In the Napanee Liestone Plain Important Bird Area some good sightings there included 4 VESPER SPARROWS, BROWN THRASHER, GRAY CATBIRD, RED-EYED VIREO, 3 LOGGERHEAD SHRIKES, NORTHERN HARRIER and WILSON’S SNIPE. An interesting sighting along the Napanee River west of town today involved not birds, but fish, and not the usual CARP that folks have reported wriggling their way into flooded backyards to spawn. These were LONG-NOSED GARS – 20 of them – that had moved into a flooded backyard to spawn!
 
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
We’re past the spring migration season now and our attention is now focused on the resident species that are nesting and any specialties that may come our way. One area birder tried her luck at Robinson Cove on Big Island where the boat launch there has been completely swallowed up by the high water which has managed to reach the edge of the road. Present today were SPOTTED SANDPIPER, BALTIMORE ORIOLES, GRAY CATBIRD, YELLOW WARBLERS, SONG SPARROWS, BELTED KINGFISHER, GREAT BLUE HERON AMERICAN GOLDFINCH and TREE SWALLOWS.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Sightings today in Hastings County came only from the Foxboro area, involving 3 CHIMNEY SWIFTS, RED-EYED VIREO, 2 each of GRAY CATBIRD and BROWN THRASHERS and AMERICAN REDSTART. Nothing from Atkins Road, on the east side of Belleville. After receiving almost nightly reports, I am suffering from Atkins withdrawal!
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Two LITTLE GULLS continue to attract birders at Cobourg Harbour, as well as some 30 BONAPARTE’S GULLS which are hanging around rather late this spring. Around 900 RING-BILLED GULLS and 20 CASPIAN TERNS also present. Five hours spent up in the Alderville area south of Rice Lake, just off Beagle Club Road and County Road 9, resulted in an impressive list today of 43 species, not the least of which were an incredible 16 CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLERS. Twelve PINE WARBLERS was also a high total, reported as one on every pine tree. Thirteen FIELD SPARROWS  were heard as well as a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW. Other good sightings included 12 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS, 2 BLACK-BILLED CUCKOOS, 2 UPLAND SANDPIPERS, 12 RED-EYED VIREOS, 6 BROWN THRASHERS and 4 OVENBIRDS. Flycatchers here numbered five species – 4 GREAT CRESTED, 3 each of  EASTERN KINGBIRD and EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, and singles of WILLOW and LEAST. 
 

 

FRIDAY, JUNE 09:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
A bit slow today in Prince Edward County, even on the 3 kilometre Sprague/Monkman Trail at Big Island. BOBOLINKS numbered only a dozen or so, EASTERN MEADOWLARKS probably no more than 5, but lots of SAVANNAH SPARROWS singing. Other species heard were EASTERN TOWHEE, FIELD SPARROW, CLAY-COLORED SPARROW and the MERLIN was on guard as usual at its usual post – high in a dead elm tree. The EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILL was heard calling again before light this morning from a deciduous woods about a half kilometre north along Sprague Road. Also slow has been the Hamilton Wetland where the only waterfowl present appear to be 19 CANADA GEESE and 8 MUTE SWANS. Two AMERICAN KESTRELS  seem to be regulars on Doxsee Road.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
Nothing from Lennox and Addington today. However, a couple checklists from yesterday which arrived too late for inclusion in last evening’s Report. Two birders at Camden Lake Provincial Wildlife Area did their birding from the observation tower coming up with 21 species. Highlights were 6 COMMON LOONS, 4 CASPIAN TERNS, 5 BLACK TERNS, 2 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, and one each of EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, EASTERN PHOEBE, EASTERN KINGBIRD and YELLOW WARBLER. At the nearby Moscow Marsh, more good sightings with PIED-BILLED GREBE, 3 MARSH WRENS and 2 YELLOW WARBLERS being highlights.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Well, this is interesting. A resident of Plainfield today witnessed a blue PEACOCK flying down the river from his property, subsequently landing near the top of a 60-foot pine tree. Where the escapee came from is anyone’s guess. And, as God is my witness, I didn’t know Peacocks could fly! Much less attain such an altitude. On a more normal note, twenty minutes of birding on the south side of Highway 2 at Potter’s Creek Conservation Area, across from the QC administration office, yielded two adult WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCHES delivering food to two young on a branch. YELLOW WARBLER, BALTIMORE ORIOLE, NORTHERN FLICKER and the resident nesting OSPREY were other highlights here along the Parrott Trail. Incredibly, nothing from Atkins Road today, but near the corner of Atkins and Airport Parkway, an EASTERN BLUEBIRD  was seen, along with BARN SWALLOW, CEDAR WAXWING, and both WARBLING and RED-EYED VIREOS. At Foxboro, GRAY CATBIRD, 2 HOUSE WRENS, a MERLIN and 2 CHIMNEY SWIFTS were good finds. ‘Tis the season for nighthawks and whip-poor-wills. Three COMMON NIGHTHAWKS were displaying last night at 8:40 p.m. at the end of Station Street in Belleville, and two more were located at Power Road and Enright Road east of Shannonville Road where 2 EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILLS  were also heard calling. In Belleville, a BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO collided with the side of a house, but recovered overnight and was last seen flying as far away from there as possible.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
At Cobourg Harbour today, 2 BRANT were seen cohabiting with CANADA GEESE in the harbour. BONAPARTE’S GULLS were “plentiful”, and CANADA GEESE, HERRING GULLS and CASPIAN TERNS were also noted, but no numbers provided. In the town of Cobourg at about 3:30 p.m. this afternoon a TURKEY VULTURE and an unidentified Accipiter hawk were seen. 
 

 

THURSDAY, JUNE 08:

HASTINGS COUNTY
As always, lots of birding action in Hastings County today. A MOURNING WARBLER was singing his little heart out today along Martin Road, just north of Thomasburg where other species of note were EASTERN PHOEBE, RED-EYED VIREO, CHIPPING SPARROW and INDIGO BUNTING. The old favourite – Atkins Road – is still producing impressive checklists and will continue until the fields dry up. Today, 30 species were present which included RED-TAILED HAWK, EASTERN KINGBIRD, WARBLING VIREO, 2 HORNED LARKS, GRAY CATBIRD, 2 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, 4 SAVANNAH SPARROWS, 2 VESPER SPARROWS, and singles of WHITE-THROATED and FIELD SPARROW. On conservation land owned by Quinte Conservation, located at Rapids Road bordering Highway 7 west of Tweed, some good birds there were YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, 2 GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHERS, a RED-EYED VIREO, 5 COMMON RAVENS, OVENBIRD, AMERICAN REDSTART, BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER and an INDIGO BUNTING. Lingham Lake Road was even “more better”. Starting from Graham Road, the party birded intermittently along a 6.5 kilometre stretch of road to the Buddhist Retreat area at the power line right of way. Sixty-nine species were tallied, an excellent total, for sure. Ten species of warblers were listed, among them a PINE WARBLER, 3 CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLERS, 5 OVENBIRDS and a lone NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH. Singles of SCARLET TANAGER and INDIGO BUNTING, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS and INDIGO BUNTING added some vibrant colours to the mix, while WOOD THRUSH, BROWN THRASHER, 5 VEERYS, and 3 GRAY CATBIRDS  contributed with song. Other impressive sightings were RED-HEADED WOODPECKER, BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, COMMON LOON and 4 WOOD DUCKS. A bit farther south, a LEAST BITTERN was encountered in Blessington Creek near the mouth where it empties into the Bay of Quinte, a continuing excellent season for this shy species. This particular one flew in front of the kayaker twice, just to make sure it had been seen. Birds noted casually at the foot of Dufferin Street in Trenton today were 2 YELLOW WARBLERS, SONG SPARROW, a male MALLARD, BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON and COMMON GRACKLES.
 
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
On Bryant Road today, which runs north off upper Victoria Road and comes out at Old Orchard Road on County Road 3 (Rednersville Road), a few good species there early this morning including BROWN THRASHER, 2 OVENBIRDS, and 3 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, and singles of NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, BLACK-AND-WHITE, YELLOW and CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLERS. Also, 2 FIELD SPARROWS, 5 WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS and 3 EASTERN TOWHEES. BLACK TERNS  are now nesting in the Bloomfield Marsh off Wesley Acres Road after an absence of several years. One volunteer with the Marsh Monitoring Program said at least three were defending their nesting territory quite aggressively.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
PRAIRIE WARBLERS galore yesterday in Lennox and Addington in continuing good areas. One PRAIRIE WARBLER  was photographed by Oshawa area biologist Tyler Hoar north of Kaladar along County Road 41 in an area where this species is know to occur. Three more were encountered at the Jack Pine Barrens Conservation Reserve west of Kaladar which runs between the Trans Canada Trail and Highway 7. I have explored some of that property in the past and it is a prolific area for birds. Strangely, no PRAIRIE WARBLERS  were heard at the Sheffield Conservation Area where the species turns up every nesting season. Two YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS, a RING-NECKED DUCK, 8 RED-EYED VIREOS, 1 WINTER WREN and 3 SCARLET TANAGERS more than made up for their absence. Back at the Jack Pine Barrens, 28 species were listed there with highlights being a BROAD-WINGED HAWK, ALDER and LEAST FLYCATCHERS, 2 YELLOW-THROATED VIREOS, 1 BLUE-HEADED VIREO, 9 RED-EYED VIREOS,1 VEERY, 2 SCARLET TANAGERS and 9 warbler species
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Good birders are truly like bloodhounds. Tuesday’s LAWRENCE’S WARBLER (Blue-winged/Golden-winged hybrid) was found again yesterday by a Trenton birder who really wasn’t too sure where on Goodrich Road to look, south of Codrington. Combining his knowledge of habitat preferences and bird song, he honed right into the location and managed to find the bird within a minute or two. At the Goodrich-Loomis Conservation Area, just up the road from there, the same birder found 2 BLUE-WINGED WARBLERS and noted that due to the excellent habitat, “everybody was singing”. He found nine warbler species, and probably two more species that he didn’t search out. Along the Presqu’ile Parkway, just outside the Park proper, singles of many species today, including PIED-BILLED GREBE, BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON, NORTHERN HARRIER, NORTHERN FLICKER, PILEATED WOODPECKER, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, EASTERN KINGBIRD, BARN SWALLOW, BROWN THRASHER, and BALTIMORE ORIOLE. At Cobourg Harbour, no sign of the BLACK-HEADED GULLS seen in the harbour yesterday, although there were still 200+ BONAPARTE’S GULLS around – 180 on the middle pier alone. Several LITTLE GULLS with a high count of five, all first year birds, often staying close together when loafing or flying. Hundreds of RING-BILLED GULLS on the piers and the west east beach, but the LAUGHING GULL has not returned. 
 
 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 07:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
On April 10th this spring, a TUFTED TITMOUSE showed up at a feeder along County Road 12 (West Lake), just outside Sandbanks Park. One had shown up at Glenora on April 2nd and I speculated that it might be the same individual. It’s not that far. Only 20 kilometres as the titmouse flies. However, a TUFTED TITMOUSE  showed up again at the Glenora location again today after an absence of more than a month. Same bird? Who knows? What we do know for sure though the CHIMNEY SWIFTS are moving. It was another good night for the “swifters” in the Picton area last night with a full and low cloud cover forcing the swifts to fly lower than usual, often right at chimney level, or below, and just above the trees. The survey group had 29 swifts that were seen entering 5 chimneys in Picton and an observer posted at the North Martysburgh Central School at Lake on the Mountain saw two go in the chimney there.  Only 16 went into The Picton Armoury chimney on Main Street, 6 into another and then two's and three's in the remaining chimneys.  This time there was lots of activity from 7:30 to almost 9:00 p.m. with swifts chattering and almost always flying over in 2's and 3's with up to eight seen at once but usually 3 - 5.  On County Road 2, north of Wellington, some good birds today at a location there just north of Wilson Road including GRAY CATBIRD, WOOD THRUSH, 4 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS and a GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER. At 4:00 a.m. this morning there was an EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILL  calling nonstop in a deciduous woods along Sprague Road on Big Island. Efforts are still under way to find volunteers who are willing to monitor a pair of PIPING PLOVERS that are nesting at at North Beach Provincial Park  As an Endangered Species, they require some help to make their efforts successful.  Training is provided and shifts are usually a morning or afternoon.  Interested volunteers are asked to contact Yvette Bree at    if you would like to contribute to the success of this species.  Your name will be forwarded to the coordinator, who will contact you for training and to schedule dates and times you are available.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Presqu’ile Park remains closed to the public due to flooding conditions, but there is lots of birding to be had along the Parkway though leading toward the Park entrance. Yesterday, AMERICAN BITTERN, 3 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, 10 SONG SPARROWS, CASPIAN TERN, 200 RING-BILLED GULLS and a HOUSE WREN were found. At Cobourg Harbour today, 2 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS, 30 CASPIAN TERNS, a WILLOW FLYCATCHER, 130 BONAPARTE’S GULLS and 3 LITTLE GULLS  were present. The two BLACK-HEADED GULLS, seen earlier, had disappeared today by 4:45 p.m. this afternoon. They had both been together perched on one of the bollards on the middle pier among a preening group of 60+ BONAPARTE’S GULLS and some RING-BILLED GULLS. Both were smaller than the RING-BILLED GULLS but noticeably larger than the BONAPARTE’S, both had noticeable red bills that were blackish towards the tip, somewhat thicker and stouter than the bills of the BONAPARTE’S GULLS. The legs were a darker red compared with the BONAPARTE’S GULLS’  paler legs.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Where do we begin? There was a fair bit of birding in Hastings County today at some well known locations. At the H.R. Frink Centre, 9 km north of Belleville, some good species and some good numbers, notably 8 to 10 WOOD THRUSHES singing, 7 NORTHERN WATERTHRUSHES, 5 OVENBIRDS, and 5 BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS. The 8 WARBLING VIREOS seen and heard were topped by 12 RED-EYED VIREOS. Two YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS and a PILEATED WOODPECKER  were also there, along with 3 EASTERN WOOD-PEWEES, 2 GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHERS, a couple RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES and the same number of WINTER WRENS, and a single SCARLET TANAGER. True dyed-in-the-wool birders seldom have to identify a bird by sight, if they can hear it singing. One birder today apparently didn’t stop much at the nearby Thurlow Wildlife Management Area, but just kept coasting along, identifying birds as he went by their songs. Among them were 3 EASTERN WOOD-PEWEES, 2 LEAST FLYCATCHERS, 2 GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHERS, 4 WARBLING VIREOS, VEERY, WOOD THRUSH, 3 NORTHERN WATERTHRUSHES and COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, just to name a few whose songs gave them away. Of course. Atkins Road on the east side of Belleville received some attention with RED-TAILED HAWK, 3 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS, 6 SPOTTED SANDPIPERS, 2 HORNED LARKS, 2 VESPER SPARROWS and 6 SAVANNAH SPARROWS being noteworthy finds. At Airport Parkway which runs east and west from Atkins Road, WARBLING and RED-EYED VIREOS, EASTERN BLUEBIRD, AMERICAN REDSTART and INDIGO BUNTING were noteworthy. At Bain Park today, high water resulted in few birds with only BELTED KINGFISHER, lots of turtles, and two MUTE SWANS being seen.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
Only one location in Lennox and Addington County with birds to report this evening - the McIntyre Road CN crossing at a swamp forest north of Bath. Some good species on hand for a birder at that location today including 7 GREAT BLUE HERONS, 1 GREEN HERON, 2 MARSH WRENS and singles of COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, RED-EYED VIREO, WARBLING VIREO and GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER.

 


TUESDAY, JUNE 06:

NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
We start our Bird Report this evening from Northumberland County where a LAWRENCE’S WARBLER was seen and heard along Goodrich Road south of Coderington yesterday. Initially, the birder thought she was listening to a blue-winged warbler as it was singing a blue-winged warbler song in traditional nesting area.   Upon closer inspection she noticed the black throat.   The LAWRENCE’S WARBLER is a recessive hybrid of a BLUE-WINGED WARBLER and GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER combination. The voice can be like either species. It was a good day for this birder who lives along that road, finding 58 species in total. Some of the highlights were ALDER FLYCATCHER, INDIGO BUNTING, 3 VEERYS, GREEN HERON and 2 EASTERN BLUEBIRDS who were finally attracted with some nest boxes strategically located in just the right places.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Yesterday, GRASSHOPPER SPARROW, 3 each of EASTERN MEADOWLARK and EASTERN KINGBIRD, 2 BROWN THRASHERS and a NORTHERN FLICKER  were highlights in the Springbrook Grassland. An UPLAND SANDPIPER was also seen, standing on a stone in the centre of the field. Not far from there today, on Preston Road, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, 2 RED-EYED VIREOS, a COMMON YELLOWTHROAT and 2 YELLOW WARBLERS  were good finds this afternoon after the rain had ended for the day. A GRAY CATBIRD and an AMERICAN REDSTART in Foxboro earlier today.
 
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
This morning, before the rain started, one birder tried his luck at Kaiser Crossroad, still flooded, of course, from the relentless rains. A big surprise was a pair of LESSER SCAUP in the north pond. With them were two female HOODED MERGANSERS. Four GREAT BLUE HERONS and a GREAT EGRET were also taking advantage of the conditions. In the “dry” part of the fields 40 RING-BILLED GULLS  were seen loafing, but the only member of the shorebird family was a lone KILLDEER. At Beaver Meadow this morning, BELTED KINGFISHER, AMERICAN REDSTART and BLACK TERNS. The GREAT EGRET seen yesterday along Highway 62 was there again today. A GREAT EGRET was seen today on Massassauga Road in the creek beside the old school. 
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
The only sighting to come in today from Lennox and Addington County was an EASTERN BLUEBIRD in downtown Moscow yesterday and the day before.

 


MONDAY, JUNE 05:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Efforts are under way to monitor a pair of PIPING PLOVERS at North Beach Provincial Park that are currently laying eggs on the beach. As an Endangered Species, they require some help to make their efforts successful.  At this point, staff at Sandbanks Provincial Park who has jurisdiction over North Beach, are trying to gather a list of potential volunteers that could help monitor these birds in the coming weeks.  Training is provided and shifts are usually a morning or afternoon.  Interested volunteers are asked to contact Yvette Bree at   if you would like to contribute to the success of this species.  Your name will be forwarded to the coordinator, who will contact you for training and to schedule dates and times you are available. A GREAT EGRET was seen today in a flooded field along Highway 62 between Victoria Road and Mountain View. This location which more closely resembles a lake has harboured a large number of water birds this spring.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
On the topic of night-herons, remember the three BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONS that flew nonchalantly past the far south end of Dufferin Street in Trenton on May 31st? Well, presumably the same three flew past there again today, only in the opposite direction! Another sighting there was female COMMON MERGANSER swimming by with 8 youngsters.  Birds seen in Foxboro today included 5 CHIMNEY SWIFTS, GRAY CATBIRD, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT and NORTHERN FLICKER. At Belleville's Lions Park off Station Street, birds of note seen there today were GREAT BLUE HERON, 3 OSPREYS and BELTED KINGFISHER. One birder at the H.R. Frink Centre today took a short nap on the marsh boardwalk and woke to find a LEAST BITTERN on a beaver lodge, so close to him that he didn't even need his binoculars to view it. And, some of us search for years to catch even a fleeting glimpse of this shy wetland bird! The 34 species of birds that he identified mostly by ear included YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, PILEATED WOODPECKER, MERLIN, WARBLING and RED-EYED VIREOS, and six warbler species – OVENBIRD, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, BLACK-AND-WHITE, NASHVILLE, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT and YELLOW. Elsewhere in Hasting County, highlights on Moneymore Road were WHITE-THROATED SPARROW, 2 OVENBIRDS and a GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER. On Bronk Road, 13 SAVANNAH SPARROWS, EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, and GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER. On Cary Road, LEAST FLYCATCHER, 11 RED-EYED VIREOS, 2 VEERYS, 4 GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLERS, 3 CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLERS, SCARLET TANAGER and PURPLE FINCH were all nice finds.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
A few scattered sightings today from Lennox and Addington County. A GREEN HERON was photographed today by Helmer Nielsen of Odessa at Wilton Creek in that village. At Sheffield Conservation Area, a YELLOW-THROATED VIREO and a PINE WARBLER greeted two  birders in the parking lot, a nice way to start the day. Five PRAIRIE WARBLERS including an agitated pair where they have nested before were found along the ridge. Also NASHVILLE WARBLER, YELLOW WARBLER, CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLERS, SCARLET TANAGERS, 2 BLACK-BILLED CUCKOOS, OSPREY and COMMON RAVENS. At the Menzel Centennial Provincial Nature Reserve on Roblin Road, the same party found 2 singing CANADA WARBLERS. At the Martin Edwards Reserve at the east end of Amherst Island, noteworthy species found there today were 2 WILSON'S PHALAROPES, 20 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS, a WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER, 1 UPLAND SANDPIPER,2 GREAT EGRETS, 2 NORTHERN SHOVELERS, and the same number of COMMON LOONS. At Link Mills, north of Millhaven, one each of  WILLOW FLYCATCHER and LEAST FLYCATCHER, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, 2 GRAY CATBIRDS and a HOODED MERGANSER – all good species. Miscellaneous sightings today included a LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE off Deseronto Road just south of Kingsford, and a LEAST BITTERN in the Rattie Marsh north of Napanee.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Although the BLACK-HEADED GULL seen last evening at 7:30 p.m. at Cobourg Harbour did not turn up again this morning as hoped, the continuing LITTLE GULLS (first summer plumage) did put in an appearance this morning. With them were 100 BONAPARTE'S GULLS, 40 CASPIAN TERNS, a dozen MALLARDS, 50 CANADA GEESE, and 3 CHIMNEY SWIFTS. Also there in the harbour was a BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON. Although just outside of Northumberland County, it is interesting to report that a rare YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON that showed up last night east of Newcastle returned for an encore today. It seems to be frequenting a small pond beside 3095 Morgans Road and is easy to see from the road. The bird has a fully adult head pattern and plume, but still some brown in the body and wing feathers suggesting a young adult, perhaps a second year bird. Anyone wishing to try for the bird, Morgans Road runs north from Highway 2 midway between Newcastle and Newtonville.

 


SUNDAY, JUNE 04:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
A good day on the Sprague/Monkman Trail on Big Island today with 49 species seen and heard. The trail is on a farm owned by Toronto artist Kent Monkman. I maintain and mow a walking trail of 3+ km in length for him to use as a jogging route in exchange for my use of it for hiking. The main trail encircles about 40 acres of meadowland that we are trying to preserve and enhance as grassland bird nesting habitat. Some of the highlights this morning were 16+ BOBOLINKS, 8 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS, GRASSHOPPER SPARROW, CLAY-COLORED SPARROW, 2 WILLOW FLYCATCHERS, 2 nesting MERLINS (harassed by grackles), GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER and WOOD THRUSH. An amusing sight was a WILD TURKEY running full tilt through one field of tall Brome Grass with just its head and neck showing! The trails along this route are so wet in places that they are difficult to mow, but not quite as wet as the boat launch at Big Island`s Robinson Cove where a portable toilet was listing to port in deep water as a GREAT BLUE HERON standing by the closed door seemingly waited its turn to use the facilities.  At the small cattail marsh here, shorebirds seen here yesterday included 1 DUNLIN, 2 WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS and 28 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS  were present. A SPOTTED SANDPIPER  was at South Bay today, but the big star was a RED-HEADED WOODPECKER. Along Fry Road today, good birds seen today were 2 WOOD DUCKS, PIED-BILLED GREBE, SANDHILL CRANE, LEAST FLYCATCHER, 2 CLAY-COLORED SPARROWS and a WHITE-THROATED SPARROW. Along County Road 4 north of Picton, UPLAND SANDPIPER, YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, and two each of VEERY, GRASSHOPPER SPARROW and SCARLET TANAGER  were seen. Only four cars were seen at Prince Edward Point yesterday, with only two of them containing birders. A nesting WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH, YELLOW WARBLERS, TURKEY VULTURE, BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, AMERICAN REDSTART and SCARLET TANAGER were noteworthy finds.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Those who normally bird Presquile Park these days are finding other areas to satisfy their birding needs, now that the park is closed due to flooded conditions. One of these was a repeat visit by a Brighton birder to a roadside birded recently by a Codrington area resident. Goodrich Road ultimately leads to the Goodrich-Loomis Conservation Area north of Brighton, but the road itself can prove prolific as discovered today when 4 VEERYS and 2 EASTERN BLUEBIRDS  were among the special finds. Other species were BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER, YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER and PILEATED WOODPECKER. The warbler family was represented by seven species – OVENBIRD, NASHVILLE, MOURNING (2), COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, YELLOW, CHESTNUT-SIDED and PINE. Also seen were ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, INDIGO BUNTING and BALTIMORE ORIOLE. At Cobourg Harbour this evening at 7:30 p.m., a BLACK-HEADED GULL was seen.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
The Point Anne area received some birding attention today. At the first marsh along Point Anne Road, birds of interest seen there were AMERICAN BITTERN, WILLOW FLYCATCHER, INDIGO BUNTING, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH and GRAY CATBIRD. On the west side of Point Anne proper, some good birds there including PILEATED WOODPECKER, 7 RED-EYED VIREOS, 1 WOOD THRUSH, a PINE WARBLER, and 2 each of EASTERN TOWHEE, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, INDIGO BUNTING and BALTIMORE ORIOLE. Shorebird habitat is still quite good at Atkins Road, north of Airport Road on the east side of Belleville where today 1 SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, 4 KILLDEER, 2 DUNLIN, 1 LEAST SANDPIPER, 4 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS and 3 SPOTTED SANDPIPERS  were present. The WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS, seen over the last few days, didn't appear today. Others there today were RED-TAILED HAWK, VESPER SPARROW, SAVANNAH SPARROW and HORNED LARK. At Foxboro, 5 CHIMNEY SWIFTS  were seen today. On Bronk Road, east of the H.R. Frink Centre, some good birds there including an UPLAND SANDPIPER which treated the observer to the well know "wolf call whistle". Seven BOBOLINKS and 6 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS  also seen here. At the Harmony Road Wetland, 10 GREAT BLUE HERONS at a colony there, with other noteworthy sightings being WOOD DUCK, AMERICAN BITTERN, SPOTTED SANDPIPER and  WILSON'S SNIPE.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
At the Camden Lake Provincial Wildlife Area, noteworthy species seen there today included 3 COMMON LOONS, AMERICAN BITTERN, BLACK TERNS, BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, RED-EYED VIREO, 2 AMERICAN REDSTARTS, and a NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH. A birder sitting in his car at the McIntyre Road CN crossing at a swamp forest was lucky enough today to hear a LEAST BITTERN giving its soft "cu cu cu cu" calls twice from the cattails on the north side of the road.

 


SATURDAY, JUNE 03:

HASTINGS COUNTY
Lots of birding in Hastings County. A MOURNING WARBLER was spotted on Rapids Road at Robinson Road in the Tweed area today where other good finds included WINTER WREN, OVENBIRD, RED-EYED VIREO and GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER. Nearby, at Rapids Road and Martin Road, south of Crookston Road and west of Tweed, a YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO was heard and seen. Several other special birds found there were INDIGO BUNTING, SCARLET TANAGER, 2 each of OVENBIRD and NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, and a lone AMERICAN REDSTART. Also seen were 12  RED-EYED VIREO, a species that we will continue to hear throughout the hot, sultry days of July and August when other species become silent. Singles of RED-TAILED HAWK, YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER and PILEATED WOODPECKER  rounded out the list of finds at this location. On Atkins Road, an hour spent there resulted in 23 species being found. Yesterday`s WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER in company with 41 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS, 4 SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, 4 KILLDEER, one DUNLIN and four SPOTTED SANDPIPERS were good species and numbers. VESPER SPARROW, 3 SAVANNAHS and a MERLIN were also seen. On the Trail of Two Lakes, near Ivanhoe, between Hollowview and Kirby Roads, a GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER  was found early this morning. Another was singing a GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER  song, but it could not be determined if the bird was a GOLDEN-WINGED or a BLUE-WINGED or possibly a hybrid. Among the 40 bird species seen were HOODED MERGANSER, 7 WARBLING VIREOS, 6 VEERYS, and singles of OVENBIRD and NASHVILLE WARBLER. Both WILLOW and ALDER FLYCATCHERS were singing, four of the former and 3 of the latter. On the east side of Belleville, EASTERN BLUEBIRD, CEDAR WAXWING and YELLOW WARBLER were good sightings along Airport Road. In the North Foxboro Marsh, 2 LEAST BITTERNS  were a surprise there, one observed at close range. Other good birds were VIRGINIA RAIL, BLACK TERN, 4 CHIMNEY SWIFTS, MARSH WREN, VEERY and GRAY CATBIRD.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
At the Gray`s Wetland Project along Wilton Creek south of Napanee, seen there today were GREAT BLUE HERON, 2 SPOTTED SANDPIPERS, 1 EASTERN PHOEBE, and one very large SNAPPING TURTLE. North of Centreville Road on County Road 27, a GRASSHOPPER SPARROW and 2 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS  were detected, and an EASTERN BLUEBIRD was found near Moscow. On Old Hamburg Road, SPOTTED SANDPIPER and KILLDEER were seen there.
 
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
In Prince Edward County, a MERLIN was also present at a nest site along the Sprague/Monkman Trail at Big Island. Also seen and heard were BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, FIELD SPARROWS, EASTERN TOWHEE, 12 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS and at least 18-20 BOBOLINKS. On Thursday evening, the cool temperatures produced some interesting results during the CHIMNEY SWIFT survey in and around Picton. The total for Picton was 60 swifts entering chimneys,with 52 into the Picton Armoury! The old North Marysburgh Central School (now closed) at Lake on the Mountain had four enter its chimney.  So the grand total was 64. On the north side of Main Street, the survey volunteers saw only from three to six over Main Street for most of the evening and then had swifts entering chimneys from 8:21 p.m. to 8:47 p.m.  But over at the Armoury, a small "flock" of 17 at 8:35 p.m., then nothing until 8:47 p.m. when 36 flew by as a tight flying group and at 8:58 p.m., 45 came by and all descended into the chimney. They had a couple of birds enter before and after "the deluge".  The cool cloudy weather that evening probably necessitated staying in the same roost to keep warm. Getting back to today, the only concentrated birding effort was at South Bay where 49 species were tallied, comprising 15 CEDAR WAXWINGS, 10 BARN SWALLOWS, 2 RED-EYED VIREOS , and singles of COMMON LOON, SPOTTED SANDPIPER, MERLIN, EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, GRAY CATBIRD and COMMON YELLOWTHROAT. 
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Whether or not you can gain entry to bird at Presquìle Park seems to depend on who you are. An organized birding group with cars was permitted access to the residential area today, while a lone individual on foot was not. Either the park is open, or it is not. The same rule should apply to all, no exceptions For those who did have complementary passes, 61 species were found with highlights being a late BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER, 25 YELLOW WARBLERS, 6 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER, YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, and BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO. At Cobourg Harbour today, 12 RUDDY TURNSTONES, 15 SANDERLINGS and 35 DUNLIN were a highlight there.

 


FRIDAY, JUNE 02:

HASTINGS COUNTY
A first for the now popular Atkins Road today was the appearance of a WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER, first ever for this location, and an unconfirmed first for all of Hastings County according to a search on eBird. The moist conditions there continue to attract a good assortment of birds, both wetland and upland species. Eight KILLDEER, 5 LEAST SANDPIPERS, one DUNLIN and a single BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER were there today, as well as 22 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS along with a half dozen SPOTTED SANDPIPERS. Other good species present there today were HORNED LARK, VESPER SPARROW, 13 SAVANNAH SPARROWS and BROWN THRASHER. An adjacent residence had CHIMNEY SWIFT, RED-EYED VIREO, 2 GRAY CATBIRDS and a GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER. At Foxboro, CHIMNEY SWIFT, EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE and a COOPER’S HAWK with prey in its talons were highlights there. One birder stopped for a moment near the intersection of Mill Road and Highway 62, just a short distance north of Madoc and was rewarded with a YELLOW-THROATED VIREO singing.
 
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Nothing too much from Prince Edward County today except for a visit to Beaver Meadow Conservation Area at East Lake where a GREEN HERON, several BLACK TERNS, BALTIMORE ORIOLE, AMERICAN REDSTART, BELTED KINGFISHER, SONG SPARROWS, NORTHERN CARDINAL, YELLOW WARBLER, EASTERN KINGBIRD and ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK. Other sightings around the County today included an EASTERN BLUEBIRD on Black Road and 42 MALLARDS in a flooded agricultural field just north of Mountain View.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
A few sightings from Lennox and Addington included 2 AMERICAN BITTERNS and an EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE in the Napanee Limestone Plain IBA. A backyard list at Link Mills, north of Millhaven produced LEAST FLYCATCHER, WARBLING and RED-EYED VIREOS, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, YELLOW WARBLER, and 2 HOUSE WRENS.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Despite Presqu’ile Park being closed, birding is still possible though along the road into the residential area and, of course, outside the Park along the Presqu’ile Parkway. Close to 60 species were tallied today in these two areas where a few of the more noteworthy sightings included a LEAST BITTERN calling at 5:45 a.m. this morning from the marsh along the Parkway and a NORTHERN PARULA singing from a cottonwood by the Parkside Restaurant. A male YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER was singing along the Parkway, and another was seen in a Brighton backyard east of Ontario Street a few days ago. Other good finds in the Park and along the Parkway today included 3 ORCHARD ORIOLES, 2 AMERICAN REDSTARTS, a RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER, PIED-BILLED GREBE, 3 AMERICAN BITTERNS and 2 CHIMNEY SWIFTS. At Cobourg Harbour, it seems the LITTLE GULL, LAUGHING GULL, BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE  and FORSTER’S TERNS  are just memories now, but other birds of interest present today were 17 RUDDY TURNSTONES, 25 CASPIAN TERNS and 5 COMMON TERNS. One Codrington area resident today decided instead of driving to Presqu’ile Park for limited birding, that she would stay put and spend the day around home base. Her efforts along Goodrich Road over a period of 9 hours resulted in a list of 57 species. A few highlights included 3 TRUMPETER SWANS flying over, a RED-SHOULDERED HAWK being chased by crows, 2 EASTERN BLUEBIRDS checking out nesting boxes, 6 very vocal CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLERS, and 2 BLUE-WINGED WARBLERS in two separate locations. Other good additions to the day’s checklist included 3 AMERICAN WOODCOCK, a YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, 4 VEERYS, 2 NORTHERN WATERTHRUSHES, 3 OVENBIRDS, a TENNESSEE WARBLER, 1 WHITE-THROATED SPARROW, 2 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS and an INDIGO BUNTING. Sometimes the best bird can indeed be right at home.

 


THURSDAY, JUNE 01:

 HASTINGS COUNTY
It has been quite a spring for RED-HEADED WOODPECKER sightings. Lots of them coming in, mainly from Prince Edward County and Hastings County. One was seen around noon on Hoover Road in the Springbrook area today.  It was seen in the same place as last year within 25 metres of a possible nest cavity. After completing the day’s birding, the birders in this party came home, only to discover another RED-HEADED WOODPECKER in their backyard on Dunnett Blvd. in Belleville. This individual is not expected to stay although there is the presence of a sports field and park-like areas with tall maples and oaks in the area. Also seen on Hoover Road were WARBLING and RED-EYED VIREOS, NASHVILLE and YELLOW WARBLER, WHITE-THROATED SPARROW and 2 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS. Atkins Road on the east side of Belleville is being monitored pretty much every day now, as long as habitat conditions continue to attract bird life as it has in the last few weeks. Today, singles of SEMIPALMATED PLOVER and BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER were present along with 9 each of KILLDEER and SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER, and 4 SPOTTED SANDPIPERS. Both wetland and upland birds are attracted to this area as seen by the mixed list involving RED-TAILED HAWK, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, WARBLING and RED-EYED VIREOS, GRAY CATBIRD, BROWN THRASHER, WILSON’S WARBLER, and five sparrow species – FIELD, WHITE-THROATED, VESPER, SAVANNAH and SONG.
 
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
In addition to seemingly no shortage of RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS this spring, there is also a good supply of LEAST BITTERNS  according to the contractors we have hired surveying some of the sentinel marshes in the Bay of Quinte area for the Marsh Monitoring Program. They have been seen in all of the major marshlands, and two responded to Broadcast CDs in the Sawguin Marsh this week along the shoreline just south of Rossmore. Prince Edward Point today had YELLOW WARBLERS, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS, EASTERN KINGBIRDS, NORTHERN FLICKERS, SONG SPARROWS, CLIFF SWALLOWS and CEDAR WAXWINGS everywhere according to one birder who was there today. Yesterday at Point Petre, a couple of late WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS, a late BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER, a BLACKPOLL WARBLER, 4 UPLAND SANDPIPERS, and YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO were among the 50+ species seen there. A few of the sightings such as the warbler and cuckoo may have been the same individuals seen a couple days earlier. Rather interesting was the sighting of gulls from horizon to horizon in a feeding frenzy. The attraction was spawning ALEWIVES and the gulls were in a special kind of heaven.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
From Lennox and Addington County today we have visits to two areas – Sheffield Conservation Area south of Kaladar, and the Tweed Road Bridge, just a bit west of County Road 41, the latter location producing a GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER, CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER and an ALDER FLYCATCHER. North of there, at the Sheffield Conservation Area, a continuing PRAIRIE WARBLER was found, along with EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, WOOD THRUSH, 2 OVENBIRDS, 2 CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLERS, and three AMERICAN REDSTARTS. Along Nugent Road, north of Newburgh, good sightings there included WILSON’S SNIPE, BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER and BROWN THRASHER. 
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
An adult LAUGHING GULL continues to be seen at Cobourg Harbour where it showed up today at around noon and was still there an hour or so later, casually napping on the pier among other gulls, about 50 feet from the barrier. Also,a lone BRANT was on the lake east of the pier and 3 WHIMBREL flew back and forth along the stone pier. The Cobourg pier is at the south end of Division St in Cobourg. Since Presqu’ile Park continues to remain closed to the public due to the flooding and saturated soil, birders are having some good success along the Presqu’ile Parkway outside the park where 41 species were noted today. Among them was a YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER flying east along the roadside cottonwoods, singles of PIED-BILLED GREBE, AMERICAN BITTERN, GREAT BLUE HERON and GREAT EGRET. Two PILEATED WOODPECKERS, 3 ORCHARD ORIOLES, 4 BALTIMORE ORIOLES and 10 SONG SPARROWS also seen.  The Presqu’ile Bird Report by Fred Helleiner for this past week has been uploaded to the NatureStuff website and can be found by CLICKING HERE. Due to the Park being closed, there isn’t a whole lot in this week’s account, but the accompanying photo is pretty good!

 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 31:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Prince Edward Point continues to be busy as the Bird Observatory wraps up another season of bird banding, and results from Birdathons to raise funds for the facility are tabulated. High water levels in Lake Ontario have been felt as far as Prince Edward Point with the last section of road between the washroom facilities and the government dock now closed to vehicular traffic due to wave action. Still ample width though to walk to the harbour where numerous CLIFF SWALLOWS were seen gathering mud for their nests. On the far side of the harbour, the lighthouse is surrounded by water and the road closed there, too. A couple CASPIAN TERNS  were fishing the harbour, but little else was around the harbour. Forty two species were tallied there today by a couple of birders with a lingering BUFFLEHEAD still present. Warbler presence was still evident with 20 YELLOW WARBLERS, 2 each of COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, BLACKPOLL WARBLER and MAGNOLIA WARBLER, and one each of BLACK-THROATED GREEN and CANADA WARBLERS still to be found. Yesterday, 66 species were around with a somewhat late GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH (typically May 14-29), and late BAY-BREASTED WARBLER and BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER still putting in an appearance. Thirty-five CEDAR WAXWINGS  were still there as this species continues to pass through, 2 YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHERS, a GREEN HERON, MERLIN,  2 WINTER WRENS, SCARLET TANAGER and INDIGO BUNTING also of interest. Fifteen WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS were seen in flight offshore, also a bit on the late side. At Point Petre yesterday, a YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO was a highlight. Other good sightings down there were CLAY-COLORED SPARROW, a late BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER, RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER, MERLIN, 40 CEDAR WAXWINGS, and a SCARLET TANAGER carrying nesting material. With no lack of water down Wesley Acres Road at Bloomfield, it wasn’t a surprise to find a BLUE-WINGED TEAL, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, MARSH WREN, GREAT BLUE HERON, 3 KILLDEER and a SWAMP SPARROW. Other good birds were GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, EASTERN KINGBIRD and BALTIMORE ORIOLE. Four EASTERN MEADOWLARKS were found on Babylon Road, and along Jackson’s Falls Road near Milford, an AMERICAN BITTERN flew up from a roadside ditch.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
At Link Mills, north of Millhaven, a backyard list there featured WILSON’S SNIPE, CEDAR WAXWING, SCARLET TANAGER, 2 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS and BALTIMORE ORIOLE. Although not in Lennox and Addington County, a bit of devastating news from Norman Rogers Airport at Kingston when officials there decided in their infinite wisdom to seal off the formerly open hanger doors to hundreds of nesting BARN SWALLOWS, a species that has been on the decline for 50 years and listed as endangered. While perhaps necessary from a safety standpoint, could this decision not have been made following the nesting period and not now when eggs and fledglings are still in the nest? Adult BARN SWALLOWS  were seen desperately trying to regain entry to the building to care for their nests and fledglings. Congratulations Norman Rogers. You’re right up there with those responsible for intentionally setting fire to an OSPREY nest in Prince Edward County.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
A surprise for one birder in Trenton today was the sighting of 3 BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONS casually flying along the Bay of Quinte shoreline past the south end of Dufferin Street. I dropped in for about 20 minutes at the Potter Creek Conservation Area on the west side of Belleville today and birded the section on the south side of Highway 2 at the mouth of Potter Creek. WARBLING VIREOS  were in fine fettle with 7 of them singing their spiralling song from high in the trees in just the parking lot area. Never heard so many before in such a concentrated area. A small section of the outer trail there is flooded, but the rest of the trail is not suffering from the high water in the Bay of Quinte. A RED-EYED VIREO was also heard singing as were YELLOW WARBLER, 6 SONG SPARROWS, NORTHERN CARDINAL, BALTIMORE ORIOLE and a GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER. Not one of these birds was seen, so a good handle on bird song is essential at this season of the year when thick foliage hides them from sight. At Atkins Road today, SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, 3 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS and a lone DUNLIN. And the wet conditions continue there. Birds more associated with drier habitat included VESPER SPARROW, 2 SAVANNAH SPARROWS, RED-EYED VIREO and a couple HORNED LARKS. At Foxboro, CEDAR WAXWINGS, CHIMNEY SWIFT and a RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD were noteworthy sightings.
 

TUESDAY, MAY 30:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
A PIPING PLOVER, supported by a photo taken Sunday by Sharon Channel of Pleasant Bay, was one of two seen on Sunday at North Beach Provincial Park. The banded birds may very well be the individuals that nested at Presqu’ile Park last spring. This year, there is no beach at Presqu’ile, and really not a whole lot at North Beach either due to the high water level. Seen this morning at Bay Meadows Trailer Park not far from North Beach was a GREEN HERON in the marsh at Pleasant Bay. Two ORCHARD ORIOLES (male and female) are visiting a nectar feeder in the trailer park.  The OSPREY nest atop a pile of bulldozed rubble along County Road 15 east of Sophiasburgh Central School that was noted on May 23rd, is no more. In an apparent move by the property owners, the pile of stones, dirt and mostly wood was set ablaze, destroying the nest and any contents. The adult birds were nowhere to be seen. Last night, the Swift Watch in the Picton area yielded more positive results than an earlier survey with 11 CHIMNEY SWIFTS  entering chimneys, and seven still flying around at 9:05 p.m. Three chimneys had swift pairs so they may be nesting. Two weeks ago there were 36 swifts using the Picton Armoury and now only one individual has the whole place to themselves. It's almost as if there are two groups coming into town: the regulars who are foraging around Main Street, the fairgrounds and Picton Bay while there is another group that may be coming from much farther afield, that arrive later and act differently - gathering as a flock.  Other sightings from around the area – a GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER on Black Road, and 2 BLACK-BILLED CUCKOOS on Eames Road, between Picton and Cherry Valley.  
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Presqu’ile Provincial Park continues to be closed to all except those who live in the residential area along Presqu’ile Bay. Yesterday, the OPP were positioned in the Park where the road splits between the Park and the residential area. All campers were removed yesterday, due to some campsites being flooded and the potential damage from vehicles accessing flooded areas resulting in further erosion. Consequently, no reports from the Park today.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
The best birding in the county today seemed to be in the Flinton area where 53 species were tallied. Eleven species of warblers were present, among them a GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER and 13 OVENBIRDS. The area seemed filled with colour, accented by the presence SCARLET TANAGER and two each of rose-breasted grosbeak and INDIGO BUNTINGS. Five VEERYS, NORTHERN FLICKER, a HERMIT THRUSH, RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH and a WINTER WREN were seen, 4 species of flycatchers, a YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, and a BROAD-WINGED HAWK. Near Northbrook, north of Kaladar, another VEERY was seen, along with ALDER and GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, WHITE-THROATED SPARROW, RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH and  RED-EYED VIREO.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Atkins Road on the east side of Belleville was the only birding area explored today during a day of rain and wind and really not enough sunshine. Three BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, 4 KILLDEER, a DUNLIN, 2 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS and 4 SPOTTED SANDPIPERS were still taking advantage of the mudflats. Two HORNED LARKS, 6 BARN SWALLOWS and 2 SAVANNAH SPARROWS  were other species of interest.

 


MONDAY, MAY 29:

NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
A status report on the water situation at Presqui’le Park recommends that anyone considering a day of birding there should first call ahead to see if the Park can even be accessed. 613-475-4324. Today, essentially the entire park was closed, with entry past the entrance gate limited to those who reside in the residential area and perhaps also to those already camping in the park. The amount of flooding has increased and on Saturday, the area of park road before reaching the park gate was covered with a large pond of water and east roadside ditches overflowing with water. Local home and cottage sandbagging continues. One birder today was asked politely by park staff to leave the Lighthouse loop area.  The wet spring is causing erosion so they have closed the lighthouse loop. One person who did manage to walk the Jobes’ Woods Trail found a dozen species, finding EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, YELLOW WARBLER, BLACKPOLL WARBLER and 2 SWAMP SPARROWS. Yesterday though, better success at accessing the Park where 115 BRANT were seen passing over the Parkway, and a SWAINSON’S THRUSH was heard singing in that area as well. Six GREAT EGRETS were on High Bluff Island viewed from the north end of the beach. Some disappointment at Cobourg Harbour as the FORSTER’S TERNS and BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE did not appear to be about this morning, although they could very well appear later this evening or early tomorrow morning. However, the continuing LITTLE GULL was present along with 220 RING-BILLED GULLS, 1 HERRING GULL, 95 CASPIAN TERNS and a COMMON TERN. A family of 7 WOOD DUCKS, 2 GADWALL and 4 PIED-BILLED GREBES were seen at the Brighton Constructed Wetland where other noteworthy species were 2 SORAS, 3 COMMON GALLINULES, a RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER, 4 MARSH WRENS, 1 WOOD THRUSH and 5 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS. Birding around Codrington has been interesting.  A couple of BLACK-BILLED CUCKOOS have arrived with the emergence of tent caterpillars and were calling loudly all day.   RED-SHOULDERED HAWKS are nesting in the area, as are very noisy GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHERS.  On Goodrich Road, an AMERICAN BITTERN calls early in the morning and a pair of BARRED OWLS take over at night.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
At 4:00 p.m. this afternoon, there were a few species noted at the Atkins Road property north of Elmwood Drive with a few of the highlights being 2 GREAT BLUE HERONS, a BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, 2 SPOTTED SANDPIPERS, and 2 SAVANNAH SPARROWS. At Foxboro, HOUSE WREN, GRAY CATBIRD and 2 CHIMNEY SWIFTS  were birds of note, while a bit north on Highway 62 near Farnham Road an AMERICAN KESTREL was spotted.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
Birds seen yesterday at the Gray’s Wetland Project south of Napanee included 4 GREAT BLUE HERONS, 2 BELTED KINGFISHERS, 2 pairs of  EASTERN PHOEBES and 2 BARN SWALLOWS. On the Napanee Limestone Plain IBA today, EASTERN MEADOWLARKS, WILSON’S SNIPE, LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE, GRAY CATBIRD, 4 BROWN THRASHERS, 4 EASTERN BLUEBIRDS, LEAST BITTERN and 2 WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS made it on a checklist. A RED-SHOULDERED HAWK was seen at the Menzel Centennial Provincial Nature Reserve on Roblin Road while other good birds to turn up included CANADA WARBLER, BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER, and 2 NORTHERN WATERTHRUSHES.
 
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Nothing from Prince Edward Point today; in fact, nothing from Prince Edward County at all! I walked the entire 3 kilometres of the Sprague/Monkman Trail today, including all the extensions, coming up with WOOD THRUSH, OVENBIRD, 3 CLAY-COLORED SPARROWS, a bevy of EASTERN MEADOWLARKS, 18 BOBOLINKS, 2 EASTERN TOWHEES, and several SAVANNAH SPARROWS. The MERLIN was in its customary Red Cedar tree along the trail, but I have been unsuccessful at locating its nest. I found an EASTERN BLUEBIRD on Snider Road this afternoon in Ameliasburgh Ward, and a ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK could be heard singing through the open car window as I travelled down Burr Road. A GREEN HERON in Demorestville Creek on Gomorrah Road. I guess there were a few birds in the County today albeit my own observations.

 


SUNDAY, MAY 28:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
A few sightings that arrived too late for inclusion in any of our previous Bird Reports – A MARBLED GODWIT was seen at the Kaiser Crossroad flooded fields on May 22nd, a male HOODED WARBLER  was at Prince Edward Point the following day, and also that day some real special birds – 2 OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHERS, a CERULEAN WARBLER and an ACADIAN FLYCATCHER. Also, it has been determined that the first YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT that was found there on the 21st and subsequently banded the following day was a different bird from the one seen on the 26th. Now that we are up to date, on with the show. Nothing from Prince Edward Point today at time of writing, but in Ameliasburgh Ward, near the west end of Victoria Road, 2 GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS  were found along Snider Road, where an ALDER FLYCATCHER, EASTERN BLUEBIRD and  WILSON’S WARBLER  were other good finds. Our congratulations to master bander at the Prince Edward Point Bird Observatory, David Okines, whose Birdathon team managed to find 162 species of birds in a 24-hour period. Coming in second place were the Sprague’s Pipits (minus one pipit !), comprising Mike Runtz, Mike Burge Kathy Felkar and Don Sutherland, who rustled up 155 species in the 24 hour period. When I was on the team, the best we ever did was 148 species. The annual exercise serves to generate funds for the Bird Observatory that receives no government funding.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
In Lennox and Addington County, birding efforts today were concentrated in the Camden East area. In the Napanee Limestone Plain IBA, 2 UPLAND SANDPIPERS, 2 WILSON’S SNIPE and a LESSER YELLOWLEGS represented the shorebird family, while sparrows seen included the GRASSHOPPER SPARROW, SAVANNAH SPARROW (6), FIELD SPARROW (11), 6 CHIPPING SPARROWS, 8 SONG SPARROWS and the same number of EASTERN TOWHEES. Also good sightings were BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE, OVENBIRD, 13 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS and 14 BOBOLINKS. In the Moscow Marsh area, a single LEAST BITTERN was heard calling from reeds in behind a willow thicket, and 9 birders there today managed to spot a GREATER YELLOWLEGS in a wet field. Other good birds were 4 BLACK TERNS, 2 AMERICAN WOODCOCK, PIED-BILLED GREBE, BLUE-WINGED TEAL, VESPER SPARROW and a YELLOW-THROATED VIREO. Along Arden Road near Puzzle Lake Park, some good birds there including VEERY, OVENBIRD, 3 COMMON LOONS, 2 HOODED MERGANSERS and OVENBIRD.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Not much attention today in the Presqu’ile Park area, but what birding was done there, picked up the usual species with no special surprises. All attention it seemed today was focussed on Cobourg Harbour where a few surprises came drifting in yesterday. The BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE found early yesterday morning at the harbour, showed up again at 7:15 a.m. this morning, however, wandered off but may have been spending time out on the lake. In the wake of the Kittiwake, was an adult ARCTIC TERN that “turned” up today on the east pier and continued to show well during much of the day with both COMMON and CASPIAN TERNS, along with 2 FORSTER’S TERNS, at least two first year LITTLE GULLS and many young BONAPARTE’S GULLS – at least 175. Other good birds to appear included about 55 BRANT that flew low heading west along the shoreline, a single male REDHEAD, one each of RUDDY TURNSTONE and DUNLIN, and six BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS – one in first summer plumage and all others in adult breeding plumage. Certainly well worth a visit there today. While it would be difficult to surpass the success at Cobourg Harbour today, one birder tried his luck at the Wicklow Beach boat launch area, coming up with a few good birds including a SORA  nonchalantly walking out in the open on floating vegetation in the marsh, a GREEN HERON, SPOTTED SANDPIPER, 2 CASPIAN TERNS, BELTED KINGFISHER, RED-EYED VIREO and NORTHERN FLICKER. A bit of a let down from Cobourg Harbour, but still pretty good finds.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Fifteen Kingston Field Naturalists members paid a visit to the H.R. Frink Centre, going home with almost 60 species. Seen in the air space of the Frink Centre was a flock of 25 BRANT, a new species for the official checklist of this conservation area, bringing the cumulative list of species to 169. A MERLIN  seen near the parking lot is probably nesting there, and also seen nesting was a GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, utilizing a WOOD DUCK nest box.  As the party walked the Drumlin Trail through the woods they heard EASTERN WOOD-PEWEES, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH and OVENBIRDS.  A pair of YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS were seen entering a tree cavity, EASTERN PHOEBES attending their nests, PILEATED WOODPECKER calling and a male SCARLET TANAGER provided them with excellent views. Other good sightings made by the group were 5 NORTHERN WATERTHRUSHES, 4 OVENBIRDS, a WILLOW FLYCATCHER, 4 YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS, 2 VIRGINIA RAILS and a SHARP-SHINNED HAWK. Nearby Bronk Road featured an UPLAND SANDPIPER, giving its customary “wolf whistle” call, RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER, ALDER FLYCATCHER, a GRASSHOPPER SPARROW and 8 male BOBOLINKS actively displaying. Down at the Black Bear Ridge Golf Course off Highway 37, species picked up there were EASTERN KINGBIRD, GREEN HERON, YELLOW WARBLER and FIELD SPARROW. At the Harmony Road Wetland, 11 GREAT BLUE HERONS  were counted there at the colony with some young birds visible in the nests, also WILSON’S SNIPE, 2 GRAY CATBIRDS, a WHITE-THROATED SPARROW, EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE and a RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER.
 

 


SATURDAY, MAY 27:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Good weather, good birding and good birds today. Fifty-four species were tallied in the Point Traverse Woods this morning with a few of the more noteworthy species being BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, 2 GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH, singles of SWAINSON'S THRUSH and  WOOD THRUSH, 38 CEDAR WAXWINGS, and 2 ORCHARD ORIOLES. Three lingering LONG-TAILED DUCKS were also noted in Prince Edward Bay from the Point Traverse cliffs. Elsewhere within Prince Edward Point, a continuing RED-SHOULDERED HAWK showed up again today. Warblers are still holding strong with 11 species noted today as we get within just a few days of June. Among them were 30 YELLOW WARBLERS, 4 BLACKPOLL WARBLERS, and singles of TENNESSEE, BLACK-THROATED BLUE, BLACK-THROATED GREEN and WILSON'S WARBLERS. One GRASSHOPPER SPARROW and 2 CLAY-COLORED SPARROWS were noteworthy finds today along Old Milford Road. Birds seen and heard along nearby Jackson's Falls Road included EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, 4 RED-EYED VIREOS, 3 GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHERS and a WOOD THRUSH. Crowe's Road north of Milford also had 3 GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHERS, and ALDER FLYCATCHER,  2 OVENBIRDS and a RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER. In Wellington, 2 INDIGO BUNTINGS  were seen.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Lots of birding in Hastings County today with visits to areas from Belleville up to Highway 7. A birder today visited the 3,000-acre Cassidy Block, located at the extreme east end of Vanderwater Road, east of Thomasburg. This birder, however, entered the property (also known as Deroche Lake) from Colonization Road on the property's east side and walked west for a kilometre toward the lake itself to where CERULEAN WARBLERS have been known to occur, and was able to locate one for the second year in succession, high in the canopy which is typical of this species. Among the 31 species of birds noted were RED-SHOULDERED HAWK which was heard calling, 2 BLACK-BILLED CUCKOOS, SCARLET TANAGER, 2 YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, a VEERY and a WOOD THRUSH, 2 EASTERN WOOD-PEWEES, and nine other species of warblers including a fine tally of 8 OVENBIRDS, MAGNOLIA WARBLER and BAY-BREASTED WARBLER. Back on Colonization Road, 2 each of GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT and CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER  were added to the day's list. Along Moneymore Road, south of Deroche Lake, ALDER FLYCATCHER, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER and NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH were found. North at the Tweed Sewage Lagoons, interesting species seen there today included another BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON, 20 WOOD DUCKS, 35 MALLARDS, 2 HOODED MERGANSERS, 1 DUNLIN, 7 LEAST SANDPIPERS and 6 KILLDEER. And, over at the Madoc Dump, 60 AMERICAN CROWS  were taking advantage of the fare. Present there, too, were WILSON'S SNIPE, LEAST FLYCATCHER, WARBLING VIREO, MARSH WREN and SWAMP SPARROW. Other sightings today in the county were a GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER on Twiddy Road, and an AMERICAN KESTREL south of Roslin. A BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER was at the Atkins Road flooded field again today where 2 VESPER SPARROWS, 5 each of SONG and SAVANNAH SPARROWS, 2 EASTERN KINGBIRDS, and a PILEATED WOODPECKER  were other noteworthy sightings.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
The Cataraqui Trail east of Yarker has some good habitat as I have walked it a few times in years past. Today, 2 GREEN HERONS were found as were MARSH WREN, GRAY CATBIRD, BROWN THRASHER and 3 warbler species – YELLOW, TENNESSEE and MOURNING. Twelve BLACK TERNS today at the Camden Lake Provincial Wildlife Area was a good number. Also seen were 8 COMMON LOONS, a RING-NECKED PHEASANT, 6 LEAST SANDPIPERS, 12 MARSH WRENS and 6 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS. Some good numbers there. At the Martin Edwards Reserve at the east end of Amherst Island, 41 species were tallied today including their usual aggregation of shorebirds. Among them were at least 20 KILLDEER, 3 SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, 2 WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS, 8 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS, 2 SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS, a WILSONS SNIPE and 7 WILSONS PHALAROPES. A party of 30 DUNLIN was seen feeding with other shorebirds in the low-water pond on the eastern edge of the reserve. Seven SAVANNAH SPARROWS, a single BRANT, 1 GADWALL, 4 MALLARDS, 5 BLUE-WINGED TEAL, 3 NORTHERN SHOVELERS, a GREEN-WINGED TEAL, numerous RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS and a COMMON LOON made up the waterfowl seen with a GREAT EGRET and a BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON also showing themselves.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
The highlight in Northumberland County today was the sighting of a first summer BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE at Cobourg Harbour at about 8:00 a.m. this morning. A PIPING PLOVER  seen at Presqu'ile Park 10 days ago, has not been seen since, and it believed that the lack of a beach due to high level levels this year is responsible. But, the Park still produces and checked off today by one birder was a total of 62 species. At least 40 WARBLING VIREOS were creating a din around the lighthouse and a SCARLET TANAGER  was singing in the centre of the Jobes Woods Trail. Two BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHERS were at the lighthouse. It seemed to be a day all across the region for GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHERS – five were seen in the Park today. Fourteen warbler species were counted, among them, 12 BLACKPOLLS, 30 YELLOWS, 6 TENNESSEES, and a MOURNING WARBLER. Also seen in the Park today were 10 GRAY CATBIRDS, 1 LINCOLN'S SPARROW, 2 ORCHARD ORIOLES, 1 WINTER WREN, 4 EASTERN WOOD-PEWEES and 2 RED-BELLIED WOODPECKERS. Returning to the Cobourg area and west of there, 2 SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS, a WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER, 6 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS and a WILSON'S SNIPE represented the shorebird family at Haskill Road west of Port Hope off Lakeshore Road. At the Bull Road Bridge north of Baltimore off Highway 45, ALDER FLYCATCHER, 20 CEDAR WAXWINGS, INDIGO BUNTING, CANADA WARBLER, 2 WINTER WRENS, 3 VEERYS, and a SWAINSON'S THRUSH were noteworthy sightings up there. Oh, of course, 2 GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHERS!

 


FRIDAY, MAY 26:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Two really great birds seen today in Prince Edward County – a YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT at Prince Edward Point and a PIPING PLOVER at North Beach Provincial Park. The PIPING PLOVER was seen this morning at about 8:15 a.m. and was observed at close range. It was seen again later this afternoon by another birder. Other species noted there this morning were PIED-BILLED GREBE, 3 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS and the first SANDERLING of the spring season. Meanwhile, at Prince Edward Point, the YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT was believed to be the same individual that was discovered in the same general area on May 21st. With 70 species tallied at the Point today, it was a good day with 16 warbler species being seen, among them 2 TENNESSEE, 3 BAY-BREASTED and 5 BLACKPOLL WARBLERS. Four WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS were found as were 10 EASTERN TOWHEES, WOOD and SWAINSON`S THRUSHES, and three species of vireo – PHILADELPHIA, RED-EYED and WARBLING. Two WILSON`S SNIPES were heard doing their spring winnowing display and two RUFFED GROUSE were heard drumming. A BROAD-WINGED HAWK was also seen. The Marsh Monitoring Program of which I am coordinator of for this part of Ontario, administered through Bird Studies Canada, always has a few good sightings which trickle in from the monitors. This following one involves the person monitoring the Central Big Island Marsh close to where I live. "Pretty exciting night on Tuesday on Big Island.  Weather conditions were perfect (Did get eaten by blackflies though). First bird survey completed, with an exciting focal species count…3 VIRGINIA RAILS, 1 SORA and 2 AMERICAN BITTERNS.  The SORA called in the first 5 minutes of my one survey, making me think that my Broadcast CD had skipped ahead.  Made for an eventful night when you finally hear the birds you’ve been trying to hear all along.  Many secondary species, RED-WINGED BLACKBIRDS, TREE SWALLOWS, BARN SWALLOWS, COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, YELLOW WARBLERS, SWAMP SPARROWS, CANADA GEESE, MALLARDS, GREAT BLUE HERON, OSPREY and a couple of BELTED KINGFISHERS. Had to fight with the background noise of the GREY TREEFROGS all night, as they were quite overpowering.  Heard them during the bird surveys as well as after dark.  Also heard a few GREEN FROGS, LEOPARD FROGS and some SPRING PEEPERS. Water is up to the road, making it quite easy to see out into the marsh as the vegetation is low and not much is growing through the water."
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
Bird life at the Menzel Centennial Provincial Nature Reserve, north of Deseronto, is starting to pick up in tempo as it always does at this time of the year. A BROAD-WINGED HAWK and 2 RUFFED GROUSE  were among the highlights there today. Other birds seen in the list of 32 species during the two hours spent there included YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER, ALDER FLYCATCHER, 2 MARSH WRENS, SWAINSON`S and WOOD THRUSH, GRAY CATBIRD and seven warbler species – 8 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, 6 YELLOW WARBLERS, 3 AMERICAN REDSTARTS, 2 each of NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH and NASHVILLE WARBLER, and singles of BLACK-THROATED GREEN and CANADA WARBLERS. At the Camden Lake Provincial Wildlife Area, 24 species were tallied there, among them 3 BLACK TERNS, 3 GRAY CATBIRDS, 2 COMMON LOONS, MARSH WREN, 8 BOBOLINKS and ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK.     
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
With the already high lake level, and last night`s rain, the trail at Presquìle Park`s Owen Point is flooded and parts of it impassable. However, persistence paid off with 2 RED-EYED VIREOS, 2 YELLOW WARBLERS, 12 SONG SPARROWS and 2 BALTIMORE ORIOLES being seen by one birder. But, it seemed that the really good sightings were all taking place west of there in the Cobourg area. At Lucas Point Park on the east side of Cobourg, a birder there had great views of a WHITE-EYED VIREO as it sang from cliffside cedars with its loud, rapid and somewhat harsh song. At Chubb Point, south of Grafton, a Brighton birder beginning his day at 4:45 a.m. was rewarded with an AMERICAN WOODCOCK displaying as another dropped like a lead weight into the woods at first light. Other noteworthy sightings there which resulted in a list of 46 species included INDIGO BUNTING, 6 VEERYS, PILEATED WOODPECKER, 2 WOOD DUCKS, a LINCOLN`S SPARROW, and six warbler species – OVENBIRD, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER, NASHVILLE WARBLER, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT and BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER. At an Albert Street location in Cobourg an ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was singing for several minutes and seen well, while other birds in the area included 6 CHIMNEY SWIFTS, GRAY CATBIRD, GRAY CATBIRD and NORTHERN PARULA.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
As usual, lots of birding activity at some of the favourite pastures. Atkins Road on the east side of Belleville continues to be flooded with numerous mud flats on the property offering ideal habitat for some of the 30 or so species present today. Seen by two separate birders were 4 GREAT BLUE HERONS, AMERICAN KESTREL, HORNED LARKS, 4 GREAT BLUE HERONS, a VESPER SPARROW, EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE and GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER. The conditions, as always, appealed to some of the shorebirds passing through and present today were 8 BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, 6 KILLDEER, 4 DUNLIN, 5 LEAST SANDPIPERS, 3 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS, and 3 SPOTTED SANDPIPERS. Others seen today were SAVANNAH SPARROWS, BROWN THRASHER, and WARBLING VIREO. The one RED-HEADED WOODPECKER  visiting a feeder and backyard in the Barry Heights area of Trenton off Telephone Road, has now doubled to two.

 


THURSDAY, MAY 25:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Alexander Island, comprising about 40 acres, while labelled as an island, is actually solidly connected by two sand bars at Pleasant Bay. It takes about 30 minutes of walking along one of the sand bar and dune system from North Beach Road to reach it. Today, there was a LEAST BITTERN calling from the marsh on the west side of the island. Also seen here was an AMERICAN BITTERN nest containing eggs. PIED-BILLED GREBE, AMERICAN REDSTART, YELLOW WARBLER and NORTHERN CARDINAL also seen at this site. Members of the Prince Edward County Field Naturalists (PECFN) went “swifting” last night for the National CHIMNEY SWIFT survey with volunteers watching six previously used chimneys in Picton - as well as the old North Marysburgh Central School chimney at Lake on the Mountain.  Results were very disappointing because on the two preliminary survey evenings, when PECFN members were just watching the Picton Armoury chimney, they saw 45 swifts flying during one pass of the group with 36 entering the Armoury chimney (May 14th)  and then 33 going into the chimney on the 18th, just before heavy rain brought the survey to a close. Last night one swift entered the Armoury chimney at 9:02 p.m. and only four others were seen entering chimneys in Picton, for a grand total of five birds, although at least six or seven swifts were seen flying even after birds had gone down chimneys - and then there was nothing. Where did the swifts go? At Lake on the Mountain the PECFN member there saw four swifts but only two entered the chimney and the other two disappeared from the area. By comparison, the survey last year had totals of 5, 4, 13 and 6 although later on in June and July numbers were much higher. Perhaps the swifts "got wind" that there was a National Survey going on and decided to hide out until it was over! 
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
Today, it was necessary to start birding early before it started to rain in earnest. Those who did were rewarded with some good sightings. At the Amherstview Sewage Lagoons, 50 BRANT greeted one birder who arrived to the site this morning. Also present were as many CANADA GEESE, 10 MALLARDS, 2 each of GADWALL, MUTE SWAN and NORTHERN SHOVELER, and one BLUE-WINGED TEAL. Even a COMMON LOON was there. Other good birds were GRAY CATBIRD, CHIMNEY SWIFT and 2 CASPIAN TERNS. In the Napanee Limestone Plain IBA, birds of interested picked up there included RING-NECKED PHEASANT, GREEN HERON, SORA, 3 LOGGERHEAD SHRIKES, and 2 WILSON’S SNIPES.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Do we have BLACK WIDOW SPIDERS in the area? We certainly do according to a Tweed resident who has found three in as many years. One was found Wednesday in a dry field about two kilometres west of Tweed, and photographed.  He said he would not have noticed the web except for startling a wasp which flew into the web (but escaped). North of Shannonville, two RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS have been around the property for more than a day now. Also of interest, is a pair of GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHERS that were seen carrying nesting material to a nest box on the premises. Some early birders were out in the field early this morning before the rain began. The birding began at 7:00 a.m. at the Atkins Road site where 4 WILD TURKEYS, a BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, 1 DUNLIN, a RED-TAILED HAWK and 4 WILD TURKEYS were seen. An hour later, another birder came along and added NORTHERN HARRIER, 12 BARN SWALLOWS and 2 NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOWS. Another hour later, A GREAT EGRET was spotted at the corner of Frankford Road and Wallbridge Road along with WARBLING VIREO and BARN SWALLOW.
 
 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 24:

HASTINGS COUNTY
Visits to the Atkins Road habitat, at the end of Elmwood Drive and north of Airport Parkway, continue as interesting birds are still appearing. Today, A BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER was there for the binocular brigade. Other shorebirds present were KILLDEER, SPOTTED SANDPIPER,  and a LESSER YELLOWLEGS. Seven WOOD DUCKS still on hand and other noteworthy birds noted today were GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, MERLIN, 3 HORNED LARKS, BROWN THRASHER, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, and FIELD, SAVANNAH and SONG SPARROWS. Along Airport Parkway, some good sightings there including AMERICAN KESTREL, WARBLING VIREO, BALTIMORE ORIOLE and COMMON YELLOWTHROAT. At Foxboro, CHIMNEY SWIFT, HOUSE WREN, YELLOW WARBLER and MAGNOLIA WARBLER  were good sightings. At Carrying Place, the usual contingent of CASPIAN TERNS  were at the east end of the Murray Canal at Twelve O’clock Point. Today, there were 40+ CASPIANS on the jetties which are only about 12 inches out of the water due to the high lake levels this spring. A few non-breeding MUTE SWANS floating around in the Bay of Quinte there just offshore – 93 to be exact! One pair that did nest in the marsh on the south side of the canal earlier this spring, has had to build up the nest another two feet with cattails in order to contend with the rising water level. And, at Barry Heights off Telephone Road in Trenton, a RED-HEADED WOODPECKER that turned up at a bird feeder there on Sunday, is still coming to the feeders several times every day.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
A respectable 63 species were present for one birder today at Presqu’ile Park where a few highlights there were COMMON LOON, PIED-BILLED GREBE, 10 COMMON TERNS, 3 wren species – MARSH, HOUSE and WINTER, 4 WOOD THRUSHES. Five flycatcher species included EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, EASTERN KINGBIRD, LEAST FLYCATCHER, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER (6),and EASTERN PHOEBE. There were eight warbler species present for this birder including a MOURNING WARBLER, always a good find. Others were 3 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, 12 YELLOW WARBLERS, 5 BLACKPOLL WARBLERS, 2 BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLERS, 2 NASHVILLE WARBLERS, 1 BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER, and 6 TENNESSEE WARBLERS. Other noteworthy birds were ORCHARD ORIOLE, INDIGO BUNTING (4), WHITE-THROATED SPARROW and two each of SCARLET TANAGER, NORTHERN CARDINAL, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, and BROWN THRASHER.
 
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Birding in Prince Edward County dropped from more checklists than I could comfortably deal with, to next to none today. Quite often happens on a Wednesday. One sighting of particular interest was a pair of OSPREYS that have nested in a somewhat unusual spot. The location is along County Road 15, a little over a kilometre east of the Sophiasburgh Central School, where a recently purchased farm has been extensively cleared of all manner of trees and fencelines. Atop one of the small piles of bulldozed earth, stones and other rubble is the Osprey nest, perched up there on the rounded peak like someone’s hat, probably no more than 10 feet above the ground itself. The two adult OSPREYS were circling the area and nest site yesterday when I drove by. The nest is in the cleared field on the south side of the highway and fairly close to the road. Easy enough to see without binoculars. It isn’t often that OSPREYS will choose a site this low although I did come across one such occupied nest flat on the ground of a tiny un-treed islet when I kayaked the Rideau Canal in 2003. Yesterday, a few reports that came in much too late for the Bird Report involved a number of interesting species, not the least of which was the sighting of a RED-SHOULDERED HAWK along Babylon Road west of Prince Edward Point. Some noteworthy sightings at Little Bluff Conservation Area down that way involved GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, WINTER WREN, WHITE-THROATED SPARROW, and five warbler species – MAGNOLIA, BLACKBURNIAN, YELLOW, BLACK-THROATED GREEN and YELLOW-RUMPED. At Kaiser Crossroad, a Kingston area birder had several flocks of SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS scattered in the flooded fields, numbering 32 in total. A dozen BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER  were also present along with 5 KILLDEER, 18 each of DUNLIN and LEAST SANDPIPER, 4 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER, SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER, WILSON’S SNIPE and SPOTTED SANDPIPER. Singles of NORTHERN SHOVELER and NORTHERN PINTAIL.
 
 

 

TUESDAY, MAY 23:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
The Prince Edward County Spring Birding Festival may be over, but not the interest in the fine birding the County has to offer. Prince Edward Point was still hopping today with close to 70 species being present. Seventeen warbler species were present and included a few of the traditional late comers such as the BLACKPOLL WARBLER (5). Still good numbers of YELLOW WARBLERS about with 25 counted. Other good numbers were RED-EYED VIREO (10), WARBLING VIREO (8), LEAST FLYCATCHER (10), CEDAR WAXWING (20) and GRAY CATBIRD (5). A few noteworthy sightings today included BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, SCARLET TANAGER and RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER. Kaiser Crossroad, still going strong with 15 BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, 25 DUNLIN, and lesser numbers of SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, KILLDEER and SPOTTED SANDPIPER. No NORTHERN SHOVELER though today. Drier birds on Jackson’s Falls Road near Milford with 3 GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS, 4 SAVANNAHS, FIELD SPARROW and EASTERN TOWHEE. Yesterday, Beaver Meadow Conservation Area produced 38 species, a very good total for this 220-acre property. Wetland species included 7 BLACK TERNS, GREEN HERON, VIRGINIA RAIL, WOOD DUCKS, MARSH WREN and COMMON YELLOWTHROAT. A nice sighting was a GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH. Haven’t heard of too many of them this spring so far. The adjacent deciduous woods harboured GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, OVENBIRD, NASHVILLE and CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER, GRAY CATBIRD, HERMIT THRUSH and ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK. Still lots of birds around the County – the Big Day blitz in the South Shore Important Bird Area on Sunday racked up a list of 121 species for the day with highlights being BRANT, ORCHARD ORIOLE, both WHIP-POOR-WILL and CHUCK-WILL’S WIDOW, SCARLET TANAGER, BALD EAGLE, WILLOW and ALDER FLYCATCHERS, CLAY-COLORED SPARROW and GRASSHOPPER SPARROW. So don’t shelve those binoculars just yet.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Atkins Road on the east side of Belleville is still going strong. Highlights today were 10 WOOD DUCKS, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, KILLDEER, DUNLIN, LEAST and SPOTTED SANDPIPERS, and a new arrival today – 3 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS. Other noteworthy sightings here were 2 VESPER SPARROWS, HORNED LARKS and WHITE-THROATED SPARROW. Moving a bit north, Foxboro had a couple GRAY CATBIRDS, RED-TAILED HAWK and a lone CHIMNEY SWIFT. A little farther north to the Ivanhoe area, good birding was to be had on Twiddy Road where a GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER  was found, and also on Twiddy Road, but 500 metres south of Wood Road, BLUE-WINGED WARBLER which is becoming a regular resident there, and two BREWSTER’S WARBLERS (GOLDEN-WINGED and BLUE-WINGED WARBLER hybrid). Two birds were seen in the same tree together. One showed a yellowish wash to the chest while the other individual had no yellow on the breast. BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, WILLOW FLYCATCHER and singles of RED-EYED and WARBLING VIREOS, EASTERN TOWHEE, BROWN THRASHER and RED-TAILED HAWK also good finds. Moving west from Twiddy Road along the Trans Canada Trail, no LOGGERHEAD SHRIKES today that have been a drawing card for birders for some weeks, but the Springbrook Grasslands a nice walk west along the trail yielded 2 each of UPLAND SANDPIPERS, BROWN THRASHERS, EASTERN KINGBIRD, SAVANNAH SPARROW and a lone GRASSHOPPER SPARROW.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
This morning, a Codrington area birder didn’t really expect anything out of the ordinary when she travelled to Presqu’ile Park, but stiffened when she heard a KENTUCKY WARBLER  at 6:30 a.m. singing loud and clear at the side of Bayshore Road in the Park, so loud that she heard it while driving. She stopped and took in its rich, rolling chant as it sang from the low bushes. The bird was in fine fettle as it was still singing two hours later. A single CANVASBACK is still in the Park and was seen today sleeping on vegetation northwest of the Camp Office viewing deck. Some 73 species identified in the Park with nothing, except for the KENTUCKY WARBLER, out of the ordinary. Fifteen species of warbler, ORCHARD ORIOLE, SCARLET TANAGER and 15 RED-EYED VIREOS though were all good sightings. A SORA, several MARSH WRENS and COMMON GALLINULES are present most days at the Brighton Constructed Wetlands along County Road 64, just outside the Park. West of Brighton, at Cobourg Harbour, 23 RED-THROATED LOONS  were seen in flight comprising one to three birds at any one time, although one loose flock had 14 birds. Thirty-three WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS, 2 BLACK SCOTERS and 73 LONG-TAILED DUCKS were a few of the waterfowl noted, and shorebirds included a nice group of 32 DUNLIN, 7 RUDDY TURNSTONES and 2 WHIMBREL, the latter flying in and landing on the south side of the rock jetty. Two first summer LITTLE GULLS flew in together and fed off the end of the pier, but an even better sighting were two FORSTER’S TERNS that flew in from the west together, circling the end of the pier before landing on the beach before melting in with the large flock of gulls.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
Two good birding areas filed reports today. BOBOLINK, LEAST SANDPIPER and YELLOW WARBLERS  were noteworthy finds among the more than a dozen species that made themselves evident along Wilton Creek near Morven east of Napanee today. A little more productive was Parrott’s Bay Conservation Area in the Amherstview area where 29 species were chalked up. Among them were 2 EASTERN TOWHEES, 2 GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHERS, 2 GRAY CATBIRDS, 3 WOOD THRUSHES and four warbler species – COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, AMERICAN REDSTART, MAGNOLIA and CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER.

 


MONDAY, MAY 22:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
In its final day of the 2017 Spring Birding Festival, the Prince Edward Point area continued to pay off in handsome dividends. A MOURNING WARBLER was seen not far from there along Lighthall Road. The Birding Festival was a celebration of all the great birds that the entire South Shore Important Birding Area is capable of producing. One Kingston area couple birded for 5 hours yesterday, covering a total of 30 km of the South Shore IBA and were rewarded with 80 species for their efforts. Birds arriving on spring migration to the South Shore do so in the millions, exhilarated by the sight of the first land mass in 50 to 80 kilometres of nonstop flight across the lake. Here they drop to the ground, exhausted, and feast on the myriad insects that the rich habitat here offers. Remember – this is the same habitat where wind turbine construction was planned to desecrate much of the habitat south of Royal Road “for the greater good”. Thanks to the efforts of birders and naturalists who have shown that this rich biodiverse area needs to be protected.  Warblers continue to arrive at and migrate through Prince Edward Point with some 35 species being documented this spring, including a PRAIRIE WARBLER and a rare KIRTLAND’S WARBLER. Today, the birds continued with other good sightings being VEERY, 2 PHILADELPHIA VIREOS, BRANT, ORCHARD and BALTIMORE ORIOLES, SWAINSON’S THRUSH and among the warblers – BLACKPOLL, NORTHERN PARULA, TENNESSEE, and BLACKBURNIAN (12 species in all). As we draw closer to the end of May, wetland birds are still being found at Kaiser Crossroad, today’s species represented by 2 NORTHERN SHOVELERS, a PIED-BILLED GREBE, 6 SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS, 5 KILLDEER, 10 DUNLIN and a single SPOTTED SANDPIPER. Yesterday, at Point Petre, at the west end of the South Shore IBA, several GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS and a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW  were found along with 23 lingering LONG-TAILED DUCKS, AMERICAN BITTERN, WILLOW FLYCATCHER, MARSH WREN, SWAINSON’S THRUSH, SCARLET TANAGER, INDIGO BUNTING and a half dozen warbler species. Four DUNLIN and 3 LEAST SANDPIPERS  were probing around Waupoos Marina today, and in Milford, a PILEATED WOODPECKER was seen on a telephone pole right beside the road.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Five hours spent at the H.R. Frink Centre, north of Belleville, resulted in 48 species being found. Covering the Marsh Boardwalk and the Drumlin Trail, 2 MERLIN  were seen at the parking lot, and the day just kept getting better with RED-BELLIED and PILEATED WOODPECKERS finding their way onto the checklist, as well as 9 species of warblers, among them, 2 OVENBIRDS, 7 NORTHERN WATERTHRUSHES, 2 PINE WARBLERS and  MAGNOLIA WARBLER. Other good finds at this popular destination were SCARLET TANAGER, 5 WOOD THRUSHES, 1 VEERY, 2 WINTER WRENS, 1 BROWN THRASHER, 4 GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHERS, 2 EASTERN WOOD-PEWEES, and 3 VIRGINIA RAILS. In other sightings around the county, a RED-TAILED HAWK was seen west of Deseronto, and another one was at Foxboro where 2 GRAY CATBIRDS and a HOUSE WREN were also noted.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
There was good birding to be had at Owen Point at Presqu’ile Park with a few highlights being 1 GADWALL, 4 COMMON TERNS, 2 CHIMNEY SWIFTS, 2 EASTERN KINGBIRDS, 1 WARBLING VIREO, GRAY CATBIRD and a half dozen warbler species. A vigorously singing CERULEAN WARBLER was a highlight today at the Laurie Lawson Outdoor Education Centre near Cobourg. Other noteworthy birds present there among the 55 seen, were five Flycatcher species – EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER, EASTERN PHOEBE, and LEAST and GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHERS. Also seen, WOOD THRUSH, 10 RED-EYED VIREOS and a BLUE-HEADED VIREO, INDIGO BUNTING and 17 warbler species.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
The only sighting to come in today was that of a BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO at Croydon. However, at the Menzel Centennial Provincial Nature Reserve, 18 km north of Deseronto on Roblin Road, 22 species of birds were noted by a party of three observers. Among the species found were PURPLE FINCH, EASTERN TOWHEE, 2 GREAT CRESTD FLYCATCHERS, COMMON LOON and 8 warbler species – 2 OVENBIRDS, 4 NORTHERN WATERTHRUSHES, 3 NASHVILLE WARBLERS, 3 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, 2 YELLOW WARBLERS, 3 CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLERS and singles of BLACK-THROATED GREEN and MAGNOLIA.

 


SUNDAY, MAY 21:

NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
We are now far enough into May that we expect to see the female warblers appearing on the scene, adding to the confusion of sorting out the species that appear. About a dozen warbler species were noted today at the Park, including PINE, NASHVILLE, MAGNOLIA WARBLERS, along with NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH and NORTHERN PARULA. A few gulls around on the offshore islands – at least 1500 RING-BILLED, 50 HERRING GULLS, also 10 CASPIAN TERNS and 15 COMMON TERNS. Other noteworthy species seen were 2 PIED-BILLED GREBES, 3 EASTERN WOOD-PEWEES, 2 WINTER WRENS, 2 PINE WARBLERS, WILLOW FLYCATCHER, and 2 LEAST FLYCATCHERS. Peter’s Woods Provincial Nature Reserve, north of Centreton, northwest of Castleton, had BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS. Thanks to the alarm calls of several BLUE JAYS, also appearing for a look was a BARRED OWL.
 
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Birding in Prince Edward County this morning started at 3:30 a.m. when a Belleville resident travelled to Hilltop Road near Milford and managed to hear the CHUCK-WILL’S-WIDOW that has been around for several days. The bird, presumably the same individual, has been heard every spring at this time since 2013. At Prince Edward Point, the “Point Pelee of Prince Edward County”, birding continues with a few of the highlights today being 2 GREAT CREATED FLYCATCHERS, a PHILADELPHIA VIREO, 2 TENNESSEE WARBLERS, SCARLET TANAGER, 40 YELLOW WARBLERS, 25 CEDAR WAXWINGS and a COMMON LOON. One birder birding the area came up with a few uncommon species today including a LINCOLN’S SPARROW, a YELLOW-THROATED VIREO and a YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT! A MOURNING WARBLER  was also reported. At Sandbanks Park’s Lakeshore Lodge Day Use Area, some good sightings there including equal numbers of BONAPARTE’S GULLS and RING-BILLED GULLS (89), GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, 2 RED-EYED VIREOS, INDIGO BUNTING (another was at the Dunes Beach Day Use area), and an EASTERN BLUEBIRD. An EASTERN BLUEBIRD was also showing interest again today at a nesting box at 23 Sprague Road, Big Island where 3 CLAY-COLORED SPARROWS were calling along the Sprague/Monkman Trail in three different locations where the species is known to nest each year. Shorebird numbers declined somewhat from earlier highs at the Kaiser Crossroad flooded agricultural fields where today six species included 8 BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, 4 SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, 3 KILLDEER, 10 DUNLIN (from an earlier high of 100), 5 LEAST SANDPIPERS and a lone SPOTTED SANDPIPER. Three NORTHERN SHOVELERS continue to take advantage of the conditions.  
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
A surprise visitor at a feeder in the Barry Heights area of Trenton today was a RED-HEADED WOODPECKER which remained at the feeder and in the nearby trees for about five minutes, returning to a sunflower seed feeder several more times today. A CAROLINA WREN is also still in the area. Between Marmora and Madoc a SANDHILL CRANE was seen in flight over the area which continued flying northeast until it disappeared. Another RED-HEADED WOODPECKER  was seen today at the Trans Canada Trail at Rapids Road near Tweed where an EASTERN BLUEBIRD  was also spotted. Also seen in the area were GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER, WILSON’S WARBLER, TENNESSEE WARBLER, OVENBIRD, WOOD THRUSH, GRAY CATBIRD, and BROWN THRASHER. At Rapids Road and Martin Road, more good stuff including 4 SCARLET TANAGERS, a YELLOW-THROATED VIREO, 2 YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS, 2 EASTERN WOOD-PEWEES, 3 RED-EYED VIREOS, a NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH and 2 NORTHERN PARULAS. Closer to Belleville, in the north Foxboro Marsh, birds of note tallied there were VIRGINIA RAIL, 5 BLACK TERNS, 2 EASTERN WOOD-PEWEES, 2 MARSH WRENS and singles of NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH and TENNESSEE WARBLER.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
Lots of biding activity in Lennox and Addington today. Starting on Amherst Island, several large flocks of BRANT, totalling 1020, were seen flying past. Sixty PURPLE MARTINS at a colony there at the east end of the island was a nice number considering how they have declined in population in other areas. Shorebirds encountered at the Martin Edwards Reserve numbered eight species, comprising 5 BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, 1 SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, 3 KILLDEER, 46 DUNLIN, 9 LEAST SANDPIPERS, 1 SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER, 5 SPOTTED SANDPIPERS and 6 WILSON’S PHALAROPES. At the Camden Lake Provincial Wildlife Area, north of Camden East, 31 species were checked off there. A healthy colony of BLACK TERNS  continues offshore where 20 were counted today. Four COMMON LOONS  were present on the lake, and also spotted were AMERICAN BITTERN, WILLOW FLYCATCHER, BLACKPOLL WARBLER, and MARSH WREN. At the nearby Moscow Marsh, PIED-BILLED GREBE, AMERICAN BITTERN, GREAT BLUE HERON, VIRGINIA RAIL, SORA, MARSH WREN, SWAMP SPARROWS, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT and COMMON GALLINULE were all recorded – not a bad list of wetland species. Over on Desmond Road, two INDIGO BUNTINGS were seen today in the area. In the Napanee Limestone Plain IBA, species seen there were UPLAND SANDPIPER, LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE, and GRASSHOPPER SPARROW. Down at Wilton Creek in the Morven area, success right now is far greater than it was last year at this time with 22 LEAST SANDPIPERS among the shorebirds seen there. Closer to Kingston, at the Parrott’s Bay Conservation Area, good birds seen there included PINE WARBLER, EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, RED-EYED VIREO, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, and NORTHERN FLICKER. Finishing off the county with a visit to the Amherstview Sewage Lagoons, 6 GADWALL, 2 BLUE-WINGED TEAL and a NORTHERN SHOVELER  were present there along with a handful of SPOTTED SANDPIPERS, LEAST SANDPIPERS and KILLDEER. Two CHIMNEY SWIFTS  were also seen. At a Camden East area backyard, lots of good birds today with a pair of RED-TAILED HAWKS nesting at the treeline and a pair of AMERICAN KESTRELS across from there. Birds to appear included NORTHERN HARRIER, INDIGO BUNTINGS, SAVANNAH SPARROWS, HOUSE WREN, a pair of EASTERN BLUEBIRDS in a nest box and a BARRED OWL calling this morning.

 


SATURDAY, MAY 20:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Another great day at Prince Edward Point today with over 60 species being collectively seen by several observers, although the Point Traverse Woods were said to be quieter than usual. Sixteen species of warblers were tallied with some of the more noteworthy being BLACKPOLL, MAGNOLIA, CAPE MAY, BAY-BREASTED, WILSON’S, CANADA and TENNESSEE WARBLERS being seen. Sorry – no KIRTLAND’S WARBLER today! A CAROLINA WREN today made history by being the first spring banding record at the Prince Edward Point Bird Observatory since 1998. The nesting season is well underway down there now and some 20 CLIFF SWALLOW nests are on the lighthouse. Conditions have certainly changed down there from last year’s Level Three drought when giant silt beds rose above what water remained in the harbour. This spring, large fishing vessels are tied up at the government wharf and there are no concerns this year with getting in and out of the harbour as it is all water this year stretching from shore to shore. Also this spring, the lighthouse area which some springs may have a few damp spots here and there is totally surrounded by lake water this spring as lake levels continue to rise a little each week. Not much shore for shorebirds; to see those one must travel to the Kaiser Crossroad flooded fields where wet conditions have allowed this spot to continue being a favourite destination, if not for waterfowl, certainly for shorebirds. Present three days ago were 7 BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, 9 SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, 5 KILLDEER, 8 DUNLIN, 20 LEAST SANDPIPERS, 2 LESSER YELLOWLEGS, 9 SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS, and one LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER. Today, there were 9 BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, 30 SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, 3 KILLDEER, 100 DUNLIN, 30 LEAST SANDPIPERS, 1 LESSER YELLOWLEGS, 6 SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS, 1 WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER, and a couple SPOTTED SANDPIPERS. Another wetland, Beaver Meadow Conservation Area did fairly well today with highlights being AMERICAN REDSTART, CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER, BELTED KINGFISHER, GREEN HERON, BALTIMORE ORIOLES, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS, GREAT BLUE HERONS, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, and at least a half dozen BLACK TERNS. Other good sightings today were a nesting MERLIN along the Sprague/Monkman Trail west of 23 Sprague Road on Big Island, a male EASTERN BLUEBIRD at a nest box at the same address, a SANDHILL CRANE at South Bay, and 2 BALD EAGLES at County Road 25 east of Lake on the Mountain. A RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER was seen at Carrying Place and a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW turned up along County Road 13.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
At Catchmore Road in the Campbellford area today, some noteworthy sightings there included BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, CHIMNEY SWIFT (3), two  RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS, one each of VEERY and WOOD THRUSH, 2 TENNESSEE WARBLERS and a BLACKPOLL WARBLER. Directly below Ferris Provincial Park along the Trent River, CASPIAN TERN, RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER and YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER  were good sightings there. Down at Presqu’ile Park, a mixed bag of sightings there including INDIGO BUNTING, BLACKPOLL WARBLER, and RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER. An AMERICAN BITTERN, a LINCOLN’S SPARROW and a NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH were near the Park Store. In the campground, a LEAST FLYCATCHER, a BLACKPOLL WARBLER and a RED-EYED VIREO were noted there.  
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
The Atkins Road extension is still producing east of Belleville. Today, there were 3 BLUE-WINGED TEAL, A SAVANNAH SPARROW, and shorebird species comprised 31 LEAST SANDPIPERS, 4 SPOTTED SANDPIPERS and singles of SOLITARY SANDPIPER, and KILLDEER.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
The 100 mark in species was made at Amherst Island, 9 of which were shorebirds with a MARBLED GODWIT heading the list. Not far behind though was a breeding plumage RED KNOT, both at the Martin Edwards Reserve at the east end of the island. Other shorebird species were 12 KILLDEER, 50 DUNLIN, 20 LEAST SANDPIPERS, 6 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS, 6 WILSON’S PHALAROPES, 4 SPOTTED SANDPIPERS, and 2 LESSER YELLOWLEGS. Other species to make it on the day’s “century run” list included 3 EASTERN BLUEBIRDS, a GRASSHOPPER SPARROW, a first year male ORCHARD ORIOLE, and six flycatcher species – 3 EASTERN WOOD–PEWEES, an ALDER FLYCATCHER, 3 WILLOW FLYCATCHERS, 2 LEAST FLYCATCHERS, 2 GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHERS and 20 EASTERN KINGBIRDS. At Amherstview, a flock of 240 BRANT turned up. A new birding area has come to light – the Deseronto Cemetery at Unger Road where the only known birding activity in the past has been a Marsh Monitoring Program at the Unger Island causeway. Today, only 9 species were recorded, but included 120 RING-BILLED GULLS, 9 CASPIAN TERNS, 2 KILLDEER and a BLUE JAY. At Croydon, birds of interest to be heard/seen included GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER and an EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILL.

 


FRIDAY, MAY 19:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
After a week camping at Sandbanks Park and taking in some of the fine birding there, it is great to be home and back at the keyboard. Our campsite in the Woodlands Campground, Campsite #677, was ideally situated to take in a sometimes deafening chorus of WOOD THRUSHES, BALTIMORE ORIOLES, and a pair of ORCHARD ORIOLES. Daily walks along the trails produced a plethora of species – LEAST FLYCATCHERS, PILEATED WOODPECKERS, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, WARBLING VIREOS, YELLOW WARBLERS and numerous others. However, that was nothing compared to the week down at Prince Edward Point where specialities down there included Prince Edward County’s third ever FISH CROW on the 18th, the third ever sighting of a LITTLE BLUE HERON on the 16th, and what would appear to be the County’s first sighting ever of a KIRTLAND’S WARBLER, bringing the official Prince Edward County Bird List to 354 ! Other excellent sightings during the week around the County included three WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS and a LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER at the Kaiser Crossroad flooded fields. A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was at Prince Edward Point on the 18th, as were 3 CAROLINA WRENS. A WHITE-EYED VIREO was found there on the 17th. And the CHUCK-WILL’S-WIDOW  continues to be hard calling along Hilltop Road. Back at Sandbanks Park, while some may argue that camping in a travel trailer is not really camping, I have to report that I followed an enormous diesel pusher motor home into our campground one day. Instead of the usual bicycles one sees strapped to the back of most travel trailers, this motor home had what appeared to be a Honda Goldwing secured to the back end between the tail lights! High end camping!


Quinte Area Bird Report offline from May 15-18

SUNDAY, MAY 14:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
At Prince Edward Point, a HOODED WARBLER was the star attraction today. It was found in the Point Traverse Woods where all good warblers go to be found. Total today – 25 species of warblers. Also present in the warbler family were GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER, BLUE-WINGED WARBLER (4 banded at the Observatory), 150 YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS, 10 BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLERS, 8 NORTHERN PARULAS, ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER, BLACKPOLL WARBLER, TENNESSEE WARBLER, just to name a handful of those seen at Point Traverse. In addition to the 4 BLUE-WINGED WARBLERS  banded at the Observatory, also banded were CANADA WARBLER and WILSON`S WARBLER. Three BLUE-HEADED VIREOS, 5 WARBLING VIREOS, 2 RED-EYED VIREOS and a possible PHILADELPHIA WARBLER (too quick a look) pretty much cleaned up on that family. No absence of LEAST FLYCATCHERS today with 5 being seen. Four SCARLET TANAGERS, 3 VEERYS, 2 SWAINSON`S THRUSHES and a WOOD THRUSH were also in evidence as were 100 WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS and a RED-SHOULDERED HAWK. The three RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRDS seen at Prince Edward Point is an indication that an influx of this species occurred overnight as 3 were seen along County Road 28 east of Fenwood Gardens, one on Luck`s Crossroad, and both a male and female at Crofton across from Burr Road. Until today, they were a bit slow in arriving. Four EASTERN BLUEBIRDS  showed up along Babylon Road near Prince Edward Point as well as a GRASSHOPPER SPARROW and 9 EASTERN TOWHEES. Certainly not a bad day at all for the 2nd day of the Spring Birding Festival. At least 100 species. Kaiser Crossroad still had a NORTHERN SHOVELER today as well as a couple NORTHERN PINTAILS, 2 BLUE-WINGED TEALS, a WOOD DUCK and 2 LESSER YELLOWLEGS. New today were 6 BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER. No word as to whether the female BLUE GROSBEAK is still in the area where it was discovered a couple days ago west of Consecon although at least one other person tried for it, but failed. Also no update on the CHUCK-WILL`S-WIDOW that was calling on Hilltop Road on Wednesday and Thursday nights. This is thought to be the same bird that first showed up in 2013.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
A couple ORCHARD ORIOLES were highlights today at the lighthouse in Presquìle Park. Other birds seen around the lighthouse area were RED-EYED VIREO, RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER, 2 GRAY CATBIRDS, and three warbler species – NASHVILLE, 8 YELLOW WARBLERS and 5 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS. Elsewhere in the Park, another 4 ORCHARD ORIOLES were seen, NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW and 7 BALTIMORE ORIOLES. At the Harbour Street Dock Parkette in Brighton, a COMMON GALLINULE  was seen along with 2 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, 1 MARSH WREN and a WARBLING VIREO. Despite rain and a bit of hail north of Centreton in the Castleton area, a RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD showed up there today in the area of Peter`s Woods Provincial Nature Reserve where other good birds were ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS, HOUSE WREN, CHIPPING SPARROWS, YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, both RED-BREASTED and WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCHES, and for a bit of size, a WILD TURKEY.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRDS also turned up in Croydon and Moscow today in Croydon and Moscow, another indication that a small migration of them arrived overnight. A pretty fair day at the Menzel Centennial Provincial Nature Reserve on Roblin Road today with 23 species seen in a couple hours. Among the species seen were six warbler species – 2 OVENBIRDS, 3 BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLERS, a BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER, 6 YELLOW WARBLERS, a YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER and 3 BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS. Four YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS  were also found. This UPLAND SANDPIPER was discovered today at the corner of Pine Grove Road and Roblin Road just south of Westplain.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
The only sighting to come in today was an INDIGO BUNTING on Orchard Lane off Telephone Road west of Trenton. Two male ORCHARD ORIOLES yesterday at a nectar feeder on Telephone Road west of Wooler Road

 


SATURDAY, MAY 13:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Despite on and off drizzly rain all morning at Prince Edward Point, birds and birders were very much in evidence for the first day in the week long Spring Birding Festival. Early this morning, a PRAIRIE WARBLER was heard singing in the Point Traverse Woods. On an 8:00 a.m. guided walk we found one good pocket of warblers comprising BLACK-THROATED BLUE, BLACK-THROATED GREEN, YELLOW-RUMPED, NORTHERN PARULA, YELLOW, BLACKBURNIAN, BLACK-AND-WHITE, OVENBIRD, and PALM. Also in evidence were RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH, EASTERN TOWHEE, FIELD SPARROW, SONG SPARROW, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, VEERY, WOOD THRUSH, BALTIMORE ORIOLE, BROWN THRASHER, GRAY CATBIRD, HOUSE WREN, WILLOW FLYCATCHER, EASTERN PHOEBE and WARBLING VIREO. Out on Prince Edward Bay, LONG-TAILED DUCKS were calling, and WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS and COMMON MERGANSERS  were also seen from the Point Traverse cliff edge. More than 80 species were tallied by the various observers today, surprises popping up everywhere. One birder found an ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER and a TENNESSEE WARBLER. While taking a shortcut from the road to another trail behind the Observatory, I literally bumped into two BLACK-BILLED CUCKOOS, the wing of one of the birds striking me in the face! At the same time, an ORCHARD ORIOLE was singing loudly in a tree only a few metres away.  Kaiser Crossroad continues to produce albeit in smaller numbers than in early spring – three NORTHERN SHOVELERS were still hanging around today. Also seen there today were 2 LESSER YELLOWLEGS, 4 RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS, 3 GREAT BLUE HERONS, an OSPREY, 2 CASPIAN TERNS, 200 RING-BILLED GULLS, 4 BONAPARTE`S GULLS, 3 SPOTTED SANDPIPERS and a lone KILLDEER. Beaver Meadow Conservation Area also yielded a few species including 2 VIRGINIA RAILS, 4 COMMON GALLINULES, 10 BLACK TERNS, 1 COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, 1 GREAT EGRET and a GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER. Most surprising of all today though was Massassauga Point Conservation Area. At only 65 acres, this property boasting little diversity in habitat did very well today with 53 species. The nine warbler species was an outstanding number – OVENBIRD, BLACK-AND-WHITE, NASHVILLE (5), COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, BAY-BREASTED, YELLOW, BLACK-THROATED BLUE, YELLOW-RUMPED and BLACK-THROATED GREEN. Other good species here were 8 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS, 5 EASTERN TOWHEES, WOOD THRUSH, 2 WOOD DUCKS, COOPER`S HAWK and COMMON LOON.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
At the Odessa Grasslands, located just south of the village along County Road 6, a GRASSHOPPER SPARROW and 5 CLAY-COLORED SPARROWS  were highlights there today. Other noteworthy sightings along here included GREAT BLUE HERON, NORTHERN FLICKER, 5 EASTERN KINGBIRDS and two each of WILD TURKEY, FIELD SPARROW, EASTERN TOWHEE, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS and EASTERN MEADOWLARK. One interesting observation came in from Amherstview today of a PILEATED WOODPECKER  that has been seen flying in and out of a nest cavity in a new hydro pole.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
The Springbrook Grassland today produced its usual species including the continuing LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE seen hunting from various perches. The bird was observed visiting a probably nest site in a 2.5 metre high shrub four times in 20 minutes. Also present was the UPLAND SANDPIPER, a regular at this location. Also seen, GRASSHOPPER SPARROW, AMERICAN KESTREL, 2 BROWN THRASHERS, 3 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS, and singles of FIELD, SAVANNAH, SONG and CHIPPING SPARROWS. On Twiddy Road, 500 metres south of Wood Road and the Trans Canada Trail that ultimately leads to the Grasslands, 3 male BLUE-WINGED WARBLERS were seen along a 300-metre stretch of road. Two of the birds sang a typical Blue-winged Warbler song, and the other bird sang a Golden-winged Warbler song. SCARLET TANAGER, EASTERN TOWHEE and 4 YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS  were also seen. Thirty-four species were tallied on Bata Island just north of Frankford, among them 4 WOOD DUCKS, 1 COMMON LOON, 1 BALTIMORE ORIOLE, a BROWN THRASHER and an EASTERN KINGBIRD. At Frankford Road and Wallbridge Road, the first SEMIPALMATED PLOVER of the spring season was seen here today along with 5 LEAST SANDPIPERS. The day couldn't go by without a passing peek at the Atkins Road site where the fields here are still flooded with numerous mud flats. Seven SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS  were also seen here so it looks like it had been an overnight arrival of this shorebird species. The number of LEAST SANDPIPERS here had risen to 24. And to further illustrate that birds are where they turn up, 7 CHIMNEY SWIFTS  were seen today above the Stirling Creamery. A WOOD THRUSH was seen in Foxboro.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
At the Nawautin Nature Sanctuary south of Grafton, 55 COMMON MERGANSERS and 33 RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS were noteworthy as were 2 ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOWS and a WOOD THRUSH. At Presquìle Park, an EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE was heard singing, and other noteworthy birds in the Park today were SURF SCOTER, BELTED KINGFISHER, RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER, RED-EYED VIREO, BROWN CREEPER, WINTER WREN and AMERICAN REDSTART – just one of each.

 


FRIDAY, MAY 12:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Another busy birding day in Prince Edward County on several accounts. In the Stinson Block area west of Consecon, a BLUE GROSBEAK was found. There are only four confirmed sightings for this species in the County, dating back to 1985. While most sightings tend to be questioned due to the similarity to the more common Indigo Bunting, the observer who saw the bird in this case is a world traveller who has amassed a life list of well over 6,500 species and is intimately familiar with this species having observed it numerous times in the southern states and Central America where the species is common. In describing the sighting, the observer stated that it was about the same as a nearby White-crowned Sparrow but dumpier and perhaps shorter tailed. The bird was a rich beige brown with a distinct 'grosbeak' bill. The colour was less rich on the belly and there was an indistinct light streaking on the breast with lighter colouring on the belly. The undertail coverts were light brown with light edging giving a chevroned look. The two wingbars were distinct and the rich colour of the upper part of the bird. The bird appeared big headed and the head profile has a slight peaked look. The sighting was supported by photos. Looking mainly for warblers, the birder had 13 species including AMERICAN REDSTART, OVENBIRD, NORTHERN PARULA (6), COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, BLACK-AND-WHITE, YELLOW WARBLER, YELLOW-RUMPED, CAPE MAY, PALM, NASHVILLE, CHESTNUT-SIDED and both BLACK-THROATED GREEN and BLACK THROATED BLUE WARBLERS.The same number of warbler species showed up today at Prince Edward Point with nothing new beyond what has already appeared except for a GOLDEN-WINGED/BLUE-WINGED WARBLER hybrid. Another INDIGO BUNTING was there today and 5 SCARLET TANAGERS.  Eight CASPIAN TERNS  continue to course back and forth the length of the Big Island Marsh. The eight were seen yesterday, and again today. Other birds of interest seen there were AMERICAN KESTREL, OSPREY, NORTHERN HARRIER and 3 MUTE SWANS. The two SANDHILL CRANES  seen yesterday flying over South Big Island Road, were seen again early this afternoon.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
A PRAIRIE WARBLER was a highlight today at Sheffield Conservation Area, 11 km south of Kaladar, a known location for this species. Other good species turning up there today were 2 WOOD DUCKS, a BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER,  VEERY, AMERICAN REDSTART and 3 EASTERN TOWHEES. In the Napanee Limestone Plain IBA along Nugent Road today, species to show up there included 2 EASTERN KINGBIRDS, 3 HOUSE WRENS, GRAY CATBIRD, BROWN THRASHER, 6 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS and 8 BOBOLINKS. At the Moscow Marsh, north of Yarker, 2 VIRGINIA RAILS and a PIED-BILLED GREBE were highlights, with COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, 2 VIRGINIA RAILS, 4 CASPIAN TERNS and 4 MARSH WRENS  also showing up. Backyard sightings at Croydon today included male BALTIMORE ORIOLE, 3 PURPLE FINCHES, pair of EASTERN TOWHEES, 2 female and three male ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS, 3 FIELLD SPARROWS, 4 CHIPPING SPARROWS, and a pair of HOUSE WRENS.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Starting in the north, a visit to the Springbrook Grasslands along the Trans Canada Trail yielded the usual UPLAND SANDPIPER, but also one of two LOGGERHEAD SHRIKES that have been seen there for a while, and 2 GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS, also a regular there. AMERICAN KESTREL, 2 WOOD DUCKS, a RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH, BROWN THRASHER, OVENBIRD, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, 2 CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLERS, NASHVILLE WARBLER and two each of EASTERN MEADOWLARK and FIELD SPARROW also were added to the day’s list. At the now famous Atkins Road site at the end of Elmwood Drive on the north side of Airport Road, some of the same species seen yesterday were there again today – 5 LEAST SANDPIPERS, a GREATER YELLOWLEGS, 4 SPOTTED SANDPIPERS and a KILLDEER representing the Shorebird side of things. Six species of sparrow, among them, VESPER and SAVANNAH. An AMERICAN KESTREL, 3 HORNED LARKS, 2 NORTHERN CARDINALS, EASTERN PHOEBE and a GREAT BLUE HERON were also nice sightings.  
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Northwest of Port Hope at Osaca, Parsons Road claimed 41 species, among them a BROAD-WINGED HAWK. Other species in the community were YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, PILEATED WOODPECKER, AMERICAN KESTREL, WINTER WREN,, 2 AMERICAN PIPITS, 2 VESPER SPARROWS, and singles of GRASSHOPPER SPARROW and PINE WARBLER. Down at Presquìle Park, a RED-THROATED LOON was a highlight today, while others seen were 2 LEAST SANDPIPERS, 5 COMMON TERNS, 8 CASPIAN TERNS, a GRAY CATBIRD (file photo by Cathy Caley of West Lake) and 2 BROWN THRASHERS.
 

 

THURSDAY, MAY 11:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
It was a wild day at Prince Edward Point today with 82 species presenting themselves to the binocular brigade. There were high numbers seen on the radar last night which translated into high numbers at the Point today for both observers and banders at the Observatory. Twenty-one warbler species were tallied, an excellent number to finally arrive and hopefully be available for the start of the Birding Festival on Saturday. There weren’t high numbers of warblers at all, but some interesting species and numbers included 10 CAPE MAY WARBLERS, 12 YELLOW WARBLERS, 20 YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS, 1 BAY-BREASTED WARBLER (Point Traverse Woods), a BLUE-WINGED WARBLER and 2 GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLERS, as well as TENNESSEE WARBLER. Thrushes were represented by VEERY, WOOD THRUSH, HERMIT THRUSH and AMERICAN ROBIN. An EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE turned up, too, as did an INDIGO BUNTING and 6 SCARLET TANAGERS. Babylon Road had 5 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS, 3 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS and two BROWN THRASHERS. West of South Bay an early morning visit before 5:00 a.m. to Brewer’s Road paid off in handsome dividends with the discovery of 3 AMERICAN WOODCOCK, 2 EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILLS, 2 WILSON’S SNIPE, and singles of AMERICAN BITTERN and  RUFFED GROUSE. Also noted there were FIELD SPARROW, 3 WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS and 2 EASTERN TOWHEES. An UPLAND SANDPIPER  was seen today on a telephone wire along County Road 1 (Schoharie Rd.) just east of Highway 62, near Bloomfield. An INDIGO BUNTING below showed up at a South Bay feeder where other guests included several ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS (both males and females), and a female BALTIMORE ORIOLE.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
At the Brighton Constructed Wetlands, 38 species were checked off today, some very interesting species including BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON, SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER and SOLITARY SANDPIPER. Other good birds were WOOD DUCK, NORTHERN SHOVELER, and GREEN-WINGED TEAL – just one of each, also a SORA, 4 MARSH WRENS, BELTED KINGFISHER and 3 WARBLING VIREOS. Harbour Street between County Road 64 and the Presqu’ile Parkway also produced MARSH WRENS, also adding COMMON GALLINULE, 3 COMMON TERNS, 1 CASPIAN TERN, another BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON and a PIED-BILLED GREBE. A SCARLET TANAGER and 2 RUSTY BLACKBIRDS were among some of the more noteworthy species at Presqu’ile Park today. Others were 25 BRANT,  2 WINTER WRENS, 3 GRAY CATBIRDS and 3 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS. At the Warkworth Golf Course, 2 RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS did a quick fly-by.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Conditions were favourable at Akins Road today for a few shorebirds – five SPOTTED SANDPIPERS, 2 KILLDEER, 15 LEAST SANDPIPERS, 3 GREATER YELLOWLEGS and a LESSER YELLOWLEGS. PILEATED WOODPECKER, 2 BROWN THRASHERS and a COMMON YELLOWTHROAT were also on the scene as well as six sparrow species – CHIPPING, FIELD, WHITE-CROWNED, 5 SAVANNAH, 6 SONG and 4 VESPER SPARROWS. At the Springbrook Grasslands today, a GRASSHOPPER SPARROW was a highlight for one Marmora area birder. Also seen were FIELD SPARROW, BROWN THRASHER, 2 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS, 2 WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS and a YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER. Near Maynooth, at Mitchel Lake, a few birds seen there today were 3 YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS, singles of NORTHERN FLICKER, EASTERN PHOEBE and BLUE-HEADED VIREO, along with RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH, 2 WINTER WRENS, OVENBIRD and WHITE-THROATED SPARROW.
 
 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 10:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
It isn’t every year that the Kaiser Crossroad flooded agricultural fields continues to produce good bird sightings so late into May. However, this has been a very unusual spring no matter which way you look at it. Today at Kaiser, two LEAST SANDPIPERS were seen at the wetland, and they weren’t difficult to spot either; both were surprisingly close to the road in the southern field. Still present in the way of ducks were a couple CANADA GEESE, 2 RING-NECKED DUCKS and one each of NORTHERN SHOVELER and MALLARD. The only other shorebirds were 3 KILLDEER and 2 LESSER YELLOWLEGS. SOLITARY SANDPIPERS  today were found along Old Milford Road (1), one along Jackson’s Falls Road, and two others along Brewer’s Road. Some wetlands aren’t doing that well, birdwise. The Hamilton Wetland along County Road 14, west of Demorestville has plenty of water but not that many associated species. Today, 3 CANADA GEESE, a MUTE SWAN, 2 KILLDEER, 2 CASPIAN TERNS and a single RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD was the best it could do. So, instead, attention turned to land birds, namely warblers and anything else that could be found in drier areas. One birder drove out to the Consecon area this morning and finally a good migration was followed by a nice day. There were eleven species of warbler including YELLOW, YELLOW-RUMPED, BLACK-AND-WHITE (2), CAPE MAY (2), BLACKBURNIAN (1), NASHVILLE (3) PALM (1), BLACK-THROATED BLUE (2), BLACK-THROATED GREEN (6), COMMON YELLOWTHROAT (5) and NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH (3). Orioles  included BALTIMORE (3) and ORCHARD (1). There were three species of flycatcher, namely EASTERN PHOEBE, EASTERN KINGBIRD (2) and GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER (1). Three species of wren were seen including HOUSE, CAROLINA (1) and MARSH WREN (2). Also present were two BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER, one BOBOLINK, three ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK and one PURPLE FINCH. Prince Edward Point produced 49 species in three hours, a few of the more noteworthy species being EASTERN BLUEBIRD, 2 GRAY CATBIRDS, both WHITE-CROWNED and WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS and 9 warbler species. COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, YELLOW WARBLER and 4 EASTERN TOWHEES  were found along Babylon Road. At 23 Sprague Road on Big Island, 3 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS and a RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH visited a feeder there today, and 2 SANDHILL CRANES flew over calling loudly. Other noteworthy species today included a BRANT at Waupoos Marina and a RED-HEADED WOODPECKER which passed through a backyard near Lake on the Mountain.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
Birds at the Amherstview Sewage Lagoons today included some interesting species, among them, 4 GADWALL, 3 BLUE-WINGED TEAL, 1 NORTHERN SHOVELER, 5 LEAST SANDPIPERS, 3 SPOTTED SANDPIPERS, 2 GREATER YELLOWLEGS and a BLACK TERN. Also seen were 2 CHIMNEY SWIFTS, EASTERN KINGBIRD and EASTERN TOWHEE. At the Adulphustown side of the Glenora Ferry, checked off were WARBLING VIREO, HOUSE WREN, GRAY CATBIRD, BROWN THRASHER and NASHVILLE WARBLER.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Atkins Road on the east side of Belleville, north of Airport Road, continues to draw in birds and watchers of birds. Today, 2 GREAT EGRETS  were present along with 4 GREAT BLUE HERONS, 3 WOOD DUCKS, 2 LEAST SANDPIPERS and a SOLITARY SANDPIPER. Adding even more interest to the scene 2 SANDHILL CRANES in the corn field. Five HORNED LARKS, 2 GRAY CATBIRDS and a BROWN THRASHER were also on the site, and members of the Sparrow family numbered seven – CHIPPING, FIELD, WHITE-CROWNED, WHITE-THROATED, VESPER, SAVANNAH and 12 SONG SPARROWS. A new area heard from today was the Sidney Conservation Area, on Airport Road off Highway 14, south of Stirling. Previous to 1972, Sidney Conservation Area (53 acres) was the field station of the former Entomological Research Station in Belleville, branch of Dept. of Agriculture to be used for biological and ecological studies of insects. The property is drained by 2 streams, both of which are Chrysal Creek, ultimately draining into Moira River at Thurlow Conservation Area. The plantations of Red and White Pine and White Spruce, together with the deciduous woods provides some great bird habitat. Volunteers and I rehabilitated the existing trails about 15 years ago, and these trails are now being redesigned by Quinte Conservation. When finished, the new system should provide even better access to the varied habitat. Today, 19 species were found here, among them a pair of BROAD-WINGED HAWKS. Also tallied were RED-TAILED HAWK, 2 YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER and 2 PINE WARBLERS. Along the Grand Junction Trail in Thurlow today, among the 27 species seen there were 2 WOOD DUCKS, AMERICAN KESTREL, WARBLING VIREO, BROWN THRASHER, and YELLOW WARBLER.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
The only offering from Northumberland County today was from the Brighton Constructed Wetlands along County Road 64. Two VIRGINIA RAILS were present today in the wetland, and other species common to the habitat were MARSH WREN (5), COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, BELTED KINGFISHER, 2 GREAT BLUE HERONS, and DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT. There were 10 species of waterfowl and included 30 CANADA GEESE, 4 MUTE SWANS, 1 WOOD DUCK, 1 GADWALL, 4 MALLARDS, 3 NORTHERN SHOVELERS, 2 GREEN-WINGED TEAL, and four each of LESSER SCAUP and BUFFLEHEAD.

 


TUESDAY, MAY 09:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Prince Edward Point was a happening place this morning. One birder spending over five hours this morning from 7:30 a.m., rounded up 62 species involving 10 warbler species – OVENBIRD, BLACK-AND-WHITE, NASHVILLE, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, NORTHERN PARULA, YELLOW, PALM, YELLOW-RUMPED, BLACK-THROATED GREEN, and BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER Some 20 WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS were present, and also in good numbers were 20 each of CLIFF SWALLOWS and RUBY-CROWNED KINGLETS and WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS. Three flycatcher species were on hand – EASTERN PHOEBE, LEAST FLYCATCHER and EASTERN KINGBIRD. Three HERMIT THRUSHES, 2 GRAY CATBIRDS, a GREEN HERON and five lingering DARK-EYED JUNCOS  were also good species. Thirty species tallied on Simpson Road near Point Petre included GREEN HERON, SANDHILL CRANE, 2 WILSON’S SNIPE, 4 RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH and six BROWN THRASHERS. Miscellaneous species found today included a SOLITARY SANDPIPER on Brewer’s Road and a RED-NECKED GREBE in Prince Edward Bay along Long Point Road. At a Rednersville feeder – 2 BALTIMORE ORIOLES, 5 WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS, 2 WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS, WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH, CHIPPING SPARROWS, SONG SPARROWS, NORTHERN CARDINAL and  RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
Seventeen BRANT were a highlight at Amherst Island today. An EASTERN TOWHEE at Croydon and six TURKEY VULTURES at the community of Moscow north of Yarker were the only sightings to come in today.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
The jetty at the east end of the Murray Canal at 12 O’clock Point, Carrying Place, continues to be a popular loafing area for CASPIAN TERNS. There were 45 clustered there today. Also in view were 50 LESSER SCAUP and a burgeoning population of 43 MUTE SWANS. At Potter Creek Conservation Area (A.K.A. Quinte Conservation Area), noteworthy birds seen there late this afternoon included GREAT BLUE HERON, BELTED KINGFISHER, HOUSE WREN, RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, EASTERN TOWHEE and 5 WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS. Of four AMERICAN ROBINS seen, one partial leuscistic individual continues to hold territory behind the administration office. North on Wallbridge/Loyalist Road, at Tucker’s Corners, a GREAT EGRET was seen poking its head and neck out of tall grass in a field southwest of the junction. Also hiding was a GREEN HERON at Tweed. A hiker encountered that bird at a marsh along the Trans Canada Trail, a half kilometre west of Tweed, hunkered down in the vegetation along an embankment built by Beavers, hiding and hoping the walker would just hike on by and not notice its hiding spot. The Springbrook Grasslands along Springbrook Road today had 4 BROWN THRASHERS, 4 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS, a SAVANNAH S[ARROW and an EASTERN KINGBIRD. At Marmora, birds noted there included CHIPPING SPARROW, WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS, PURPLE FINCHES and lots of AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES. In Trenton, at the far end of Dufferin Avenue at the Bay of Quinte, SWAMP SPARROW and BELTED KINGFISHER were noted.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Presqu’ile Park’s PIPING PLOVER appeared again today and 2 COMMON TERNS also put in an appearance. Outside the Park at the Brighton Constructed Wetlands along County Road 64, six species of ducks there – 3 WOOD DUCKS, 5 MALLARDS, 3 NORTHERN SHOVELERS, 6 BUFFLEHEADS and singles of GREEN-WINGED TEAL and LESSER SCAUP. The population of COMMON GALLINULES  is starting to build and there were 11 there today. Across the road at the Brighton Sewage Lagoon, six NORTHERN SHOVELERS were there along with 16 BUFFLEHEAD and 3 LESSER SCAUP. There was also a SPOTTED SANDPIPER.

 


MONDAY, MAY 08:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
It’s a colourful time of the year with BALTIMORE ORIOLES, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS and the occasional INDIGO BUNTING show up at local backyard bird feeders. While feeders can often be enough to tempt you no further than the backyard, the spring migration is still going full tilt, and there’s lots out there,  and today was no exception when it came to bird activity. Lots of colour to brighten an otherwise dull day in the Point Traverse Woods with one species, the BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER who wrote the book on showcasing colour, even on cloudy days. Other warblers were there too – NORTHERN PARULA, YELLOW, PALM, PINE, and YELLOW-RUMPED. Colour in the woods was also provided by BALTIMORE ORIOLE, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, 2 VEERIES, BROWN THRASHER, BLUE-HEADED VIREO and RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH. Also doing their part were both WHITE-CROWNED and WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS, HOUSE WRENS (2), and two each of EASTERN KINGBIRD and BLUE-HEADED VIREO. At Prince Edward Point in the area of the Bird Observatory, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, EASTERN TOWHEE and  RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET added to the scene, as did GREAT BLUE HERON, RUFFED GROUSE and AMERICAN GOLDFINCH. Along Long Point Road approaching Prince Edward Point, a NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD  was spotted today, and along Babylon Road, YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, AMERICAN KESTREL, EASTERN KINGBIRD, BROWN THRASHER, EASTERN TOWHEE, 5 WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS and 2 FIELD SPARROWS  were noteworthy sightings. GREAT EGRET, PIED-BILLED GREBE, COMMON GALLINULE, PINE WARBLER, MARSH WREN and 25 WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS turned up there. COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, HOUSE WREN, YELLOW WARBLER, 2 WOOD DUCKS and 10 GREATER/LESSER YELLOWLEGS were good sightings along Huff’s Island Road
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
A male BOBOLINK singing lustily from a tree beside a field in Moscow was probably unaware of the predicted temperature drop this evening to a low of 1 degree and a risk of frost. Same for tomorrow actually.
Some great sightings at Amherst Island. Along with the usual species expected at this time of the year, the Owl Woods produced five warbler species, among them, a GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER. Others present too were NASHVILLE, YELLOW, YELLOW-RUMPED and BLACK-THROATED GREEN. Two BRANT were found in the Martin Edwards Nature Reserve at the far east end of the island, sitting in grass to the west of the pond with two BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER also in view at the same time. It was a prolific day for shorebirds as 3 WILSON’S PHALAROPES  were also on hand, as were 4 LEAST SANDPIPERS, WILSON’S SNIPE, SPOTTED SANDPIPER, GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS and, of course, KILLDEER. Over on the mainland, at the Amherstview Sewage Lagoons, GADWALL (6) MALLARD (2), BLUE-WINGED TEAL (4), NORTHERN SHOVELER (3), RING-NECKED DUCK (2), LESSER SCAUP (16), and BUFFLEHEAD (50) were present. And in the Napanee River just west of town -was it Jesus of the bird world walking upon the surface of the water? No, it was just a SPOTTED SANDPIPER, tiptoeing on the surface of a slightly submerged backyard dock.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Similar excitement in Hastings County today. A LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE  was seen again in the Springbrook Grasslands along the Trans Canada Trail. Not unexpected were a couple UPLAND SANDPIPERS which are regular breeders here. Also a regular, a GRASSHOPPER SPARROW  was present as well as other species typical of the area – AMERICAN KESTREL, BROWN THRASHER, FIELD SPARROW, SAVANNAH SPARROW, EASTERN TOWHEE and 5 EASTERN MEADOWLARK. At Twiddy Road where the  trail passes over as it approaches Highway 62 north of Ivanhoe, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, EASTERN TOWHEE, BROWN THRASHER and WOOD THRUSH were noted. The regular ICELAND GULL was once again at the Madoc Dump along Highway 7 east of Madoc.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
At the Lone Pine Marsh on Pogue Road north of Colborne, 33 species were tallied today including a LEAST BITTERN that called frequently from a dense cattail stand on the west side of Pogue Road. Other good species seen there today at the same location were RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER, 2 YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER and PILEATED WOODPECKER. Two WOOD THRUSHES were also there along with two WINTER WRENS, 3 NORTHERN WATERTHRUSHES, OVENBIRD  and COMMON YELLOWTHROAT. At Barry Heights in Trenton off Telephone Road, a male RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD  showed up at 7:30 a.m. this morning, somewhat fluffed up due to the cool temperatures. Three tardy DARK-EYED JUNCOS  are also lingering at this address.

 


SUNDAY, MAY 07:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
The first BLACK TERNS of the spring season have returned to Beaver Meadow Conservation Area, south of Picton with the sighting of two individuals. Other species that have been out there the last day or two include an adult BALD EAGLE,  PIED-BILLED GREBES, WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS, WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS, RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS and ORCHARD ORIOLE. The latter species also seen today at Bay Meadows Trailer Park at Pleasant Bay along with COMMON LOON, AMERICAN BITTERN, WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW, OSPREY and a female ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK. Six BUFFLEHEAD  were seen in Lake Ontario off West Point at Sandbanks Park yesterday. Other birds seen along the Lakeview Trail from West Point were 5 YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS, NORTHERN PARULA, RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH and 2 WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS. A cruise along the entire length of Huff’s Island Road today to the extreme east end produced an impressive list of 52 species early this morning with a few of the more noteworthy finds being 5 AMERICAN WIGEON, 20 GREEN-WINGED TEAL, 1 AMERICAN BITTERN, a VIRGINIA RAIL, 2 LEAST SANDPIPERS and both GREATER (12) and LESSER (8) YELLOWLEGS and 5 CASPIAN TERNS. Also of interest was a PEREGRINE FALCON, RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER, 3 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS and singles of HORNED LARK, BROWN THRASHER and EASTERN TOWHEE. At Lake on the Mountain Provincial Park, highlights there were singles of GRAY CATBIRD, YELLOW WARBLER, WHITE-THROATED SPARROW and SONG SPARROW. Down in the Cressy area, Rock Crossroad from Cape Vessey had two each of BROWN THRASHER and EASTERN TOWHEE, and singles of FIELD SPARROW and WHITE-THROATED SPARROW. 
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
The celebrated PAINTED BUNTING south of Denbigh was a no-show today and it is believed that the rare visitor has departed, last spotted yesterday morning. The weather in Denbigh was less than conducive(consistent rain and snow), and might have contributed to the bird leaving. At the Ham Road CN crossing, 3 LESSER YELLOWLEGS, 8 RUSTY BLACKBIRDS and a BLUE-HEADED VIREO were found, and at Finkle’s Shore Park, 30 ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOWS and 40 BARN SWALLOWS were counted. Singles of MALLARD, BUFFLEHEAD, COMMON LOON, KILLDEER and BELTED KINGFISHER were also counted. And a backyard count of birds at Link Mills north of Millhaven included 6 WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS, 5 WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS and a BARN THRASHER and a lingering DARK-EYED JUNCO.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Five species of warbler on Cross Road and Read Road, one of them a BREWSTER’S WARBLER. Other good birds seen at this location north of Shannonville included OVENBIRD, AMERICAN REDSTART, NASHVILLE WARBLER, RUFFED GROUSE and WHITE-THROATED SPARROW. At the H.R. Frink Centre in the Plainfield area, 48 species were tallied at 7:30 a.m. this morning, some nice finds there including 2 WOOD DUCKS, BROAD-WINGED HAWK, VIRGINIA RAIL, SORA, SOLITARY SANDPIPER, LEAST FLYCATCHER, and WARBLING VIREO. The list rambled on with 4 RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH, 3 BROWN CREEPER, 2 WINTER WREN, 3 OVENBIRD, 8 NORTHERN WATERTHRUSHES, a PINE WARBLER and a BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER. On the far south side of the Frink Centre wetland, along Harmony Road, another VIRGINIA RAIL and SORA were heard as well as a NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, RUSTY BLACKBIRD and SPOTTED SANDPIPER. At Blessington and Bronk Roads, UPLAND SANDPIPER, VESPER SPARROW, SAVANNAH SPARROW and 4 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS  turned up there, and on Atkins Road on the east side of Belleville, 3 GREATER YELLOWLEGS and the same number of WOOD DUCKS  were good sightings. In light snow and rain, the Cheese Factory Trail north of Naphan Road managed to come up with a RED-SHOULDERED HAWK, a BROAD-WINGED HAWK and a RED-TAILED HAWK. A BLUE-WINGED WARBLER, a regular at this location, also turned up as did a LEAST FLYCATCHER, 3 OVENBIRDS, EASTERN TOWHEE and a  WOOD THRUSH. Along Bronk Road, A GRASSHOPPER SPARROW  was a good find, and 2 UPLAND SANDPIPERS were also noteworthy. East of Madoc along Highway 7 today, there was an ICELAND GULL and an adult LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL, the latter a continuing bird. Over 100 BUFFLEHEADS were still in evidence at the Madoc Sewage Lagoon, also 2 NORTHERN SHOVELERS, 53 RING-NECKED DUCKS and a HOODED MERGANSER.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
At Presqu’ile Park, a CAPE MAY WARBLER  was a good sighting. Two REDHEADS, MERLIN, BLUE-HEADED VIREO4 HOUSE WRENS and a WINTER WREN were seen. BALTIMORE ORIOLE, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER and RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH were other good birds seen in the Park today.

 


SATURDAY, MAY 06:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Okay – birders in Prince Edward County took yesterday off because it was raining. Still raining today, but you can’t stop birders or birding. Focus today was on a few of the popular focal points rather than nooks and crannies that might not have much of interest. Prince Edward Point produced a respectable total of 52 species, six of them warblers – 1 BLACK-AND-WHITE, 10 YELLOW, 4 YELLOW-RUMPED, 3 BLACK-THROATED GREEN, 1 COMMON YELLOWTHROAT and 4 NORTHERN PARULA. In good supply were WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS with 20 being seen, and the same number of CLIFF SWALLOWS. Among the flycatchers seen by observers were GREAT CRESTED, EASTERN KINGBIRD, EASTERN PHOEBE and LEAST FLYCATCHER. Other good species were 8 EASTERN TOWHEES, 2 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS, 2 RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES, YELLOW-BELIED SAPSUCKER, and one each of GADWALL, WILSON’S SNIPE, BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER, WOOD THRUSH and GRAY CATBIRD. Some nice colour there under the raindrops. The Kaiser Crossroad flooded fields still have some interesting birds to make a visit worthwhile. At noon today, there was still a NORTHERN SHOVELER, 2 CANADA GEESE, a GREEN-WINGED TEAL and 4 RING-NECKED DUCKS. With them were singles of KILLDEER, SPOTTED SANDPIPER and GREATER YELLOWLEGS.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
In Hastings County, two visits today to the Aitkins Road site on the east side of Belleville by two observers – one at 8:00 a.m. and another at high noon, resulted in 34 species being seen collectively. The long rising and falling whistle of an UPLAND SANDPIPER was heard – a regular summer resident here – and both GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS, KILLDEER, and SPOTTED SANDPIPER were also present. At one point, 100 RING-BILLED GULLS  were there. Rounding out the list were 3 HORNED LARKS, 1 WOOD DUCK, and CHIPPING, SONG, VESPER, and SAVANNAH SPARROWS. Three GREAT BLUE HERONS, an OSPREY and a PILEATED WOODPECKER at the H.R. Frink Centre at noon today.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
Starting with the PAINTED BUNTING south of Denbigh, it’s still in its usual spot. A LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE  was found today on Nugent Road in the Napanee Limestone Plain IBA. EASTERN KINGBIRD and 8 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS also found there. At the Camden Lake Provincial Wildlife Area, a half hour spent there resulted in a dozen species being noted, among them, 2 BLUE-WINGED TEAL, 10 CASPIAN TERNS, PILEATED WOODPECKER, 2 EASTERN KINGBIRDS, and 2 YELLOW WARBLERS. At Kaladar, a PRAIRIE WARBLER was seen and heard singing.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
A few birds in Presqu’ile Park today including a male CANVASBACK still hanging around. Still time for it to move on. The same could be said for a lone LONG-TAILED DUCK and it’s early enough there are probably quite a few others out on the open lake somewhere. Eight COMMON TERNS  were seen today in the Park, 2 each of HORNED and PIED-BILLED GREBE, COMMON GALLINULE and SPOTTED SANDPIPER. Along the Parkway today, an OSPREY was seen doing a barrel roll display for 10 minutes while two others flew around nearby. A few RING-BILLED GULLS flying around – an estimated 1,000 of them. Also flying over, 2 GREAT EGRETS. A COMMON YELLOWTHROAT was heard singing and other species of interest seen along the Parkway included NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW, MERLIN and SHARP-SHINNED HAWK. Also seen was a SOLITARY SANDPIPER.

 


FRIDAY, MAY 05: 

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Interesting. Not many folks out birding today! However, there were a few here and there, determined to keep up to date with what species have arrived and which ones are still around. PURPLE FINCHES are still passing through Prince Edward Point these days. North of Wellington, along County Road 2, just past Wilson Road, some great species up that way today including 2 RED-BELLIED WOODPECKERS, a RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH, 1 WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW, 5 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS and a BALTIMORE ORIOLE. 
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Moist conditions, too, today at Presqu’ile Park where a drive around the Park revealed three areas where the road was covered with water. Access to Calf Pasture was blocked off as the parking area down there was under water. One birder early this morning braved the steady rain and spent an hour and 20 minutes, coming up with a respectable list of 36 species. A few of the more noteworthy species were 14 GREEN-WINGED TEAL, both WHITE-THROATED and WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, BROWN THRASHER, HOUSE WREN, 10 LESSER YELLOWLEGS, 4 LEAST SANDPIPERS and 2 KILLDEER. Even the PIPING PLOVER showed up again today at the water’s edge along Beaches 3 & 4.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Rather slim pickin’s in Hastings today and the only sightings to come in were in Belleville. Over in the lower part of Lion’s Park (erroneously identified in eBird as Memorial Park which is actually the park in behind it), the nesting OSPREY of course, 3 CANADA GEESE, 6 MALLARDS and 2 HOODED MERGANSERS. 
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
At the CN crossing along Ham Road west of Link Mills and north of Millhaven, GREATER YELLOWLEGS, 4 GREEN-WINGED TEAL, a KILLDEER and 1 SPOTTED SANDPIPER  were seen today between the raindrops. At Croydon 2 female ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS arrived at a feeder there today.
 
FRONTENAC COUNTY
Since we have lots of room for sightings this evening, we will include the sightings from another birder who traipsed around in the steady rain at 6:40 a.m. this morning. The location was just on the north side of Verona and among some of the highlights there included 3 PINE WARBLERS, and two each of BLACK-THROATED GREEN, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH and OVENBIRD. Four  WOOD THRUSH were also seen.

 


THURSDAY, MAY 04:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Before the rain decided to commence this morning, two of us enjoyed a bird walk around the Sprague/Monkman private trail just west of Sprague Road on Big Island, coming up with 29 species in a little more than an hour’s time. A MERLIN was creating a fuss as we walked beneath a Red Cedar in which it was perched. MERLINS nest along the trail every year, but this individual was being extra careful about not revealing the exact location. Five BROWN THRASHERS, 5 FIELD SPARROWS, 4 SAVANNAH SPARROWS and an EASTERN TOWHEE were among some of the highlights along with 2 BOBOLINKS, 2 WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS, a RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, and an OSPREY circling overhead. From the Big Island Marsh, the open pond beside the road had CANADA GEESE, MALLARD, PIED-BILLED GREBE and a BELTED KINGFISHER. Some good birds this morning in the Consecon area before the upcoming rains. There were five species of Warbler with widespread YELLOW and YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER and five COMMON YELLOWTHROATS all in a wet habitat. There were also singles of PINE and NASHVILLE WARBLER. Other more recent arrivals for that area included four  GRAY CATBIRDS, five WARBLING VIREOS, two BLUE-HEADED VIREOS and singles of BALTIMORE ORIOLE, ORCHARD ORIOLE, EASTERN KINGBIRD, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK and PURPLE FINCH. A doubly satisfying sight was a close adult COOPER’S HAWK eating a Starling! On Glen Lane, a CAROLINA WREN was carrying food to a nest box. This is the same area that had a bird in early winter. At Crofton, south of Mountain View, an EASTERN BLUEBIRD is doing battle with TREE SWALLOWS  for rightful ownership of a nest box. YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER and PALM WARBLER at the Lakeshore Lodge Day Use Area at Sandbanks Park. By the way, the gate to Beaver Meadow Conservation Area is finally open. Enjoy.
HASTINGS COUNTY
Lots happening today in Hastings County. The Springbrook Grasslands along the Trans Canada Trail, 3 kilometres west of Twiddy Road today, yielded 30 species. In addition to a single LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE perched atop a Red Cedar, other good sightings – actually hearings – was a SANDHILL CRANE calling in flight and an UPLAND SANDPIPER, also calling. WILSON’S SNIPE, PILEATED WOODPECKER, AMERICAN KESTREL, RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, 2 EASTERN BLUEBIRDS, a HERMIT THRUSH, 4 BROWN THRASHERS, 5 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS, 4 FIELD SPARROWS, a VESPER SPARROW and a GRASSHOPPER SPARROW. Darn good day, I would say. Atkins Road on the east side of Belleville, has become “Lake Atkins” according to a resident there, continuing to be a good spot for both Yellowlegs species, often right beside the road if anyone wants good views and comparisons of the two species. Today, there were 4 GREATER YELLOWLEGS and 14 LESSER YELLOWLEGS there, and a SPOTTED SANDPIPER. Extensive flooding in the field around the pond was ideal habitat today  for 8 GREEN-WINGED TEAL, 2 WOOD DUCKS and 7 MALLARDS. Other noteworthy birds there today were six Sparrow species – CHIPPING (3), FIELD (1), WHITE-THROATED (1), VESPER (2), SAVANNAH (5), SONG (8 ), an an EASTERN TOWHEE. A thorough exploration of the Harmony Road area, north of Belleville, resulted in some interesting species today. The Harmony Road Wetland produced WILSON’S SNIPE, SPOTTED SANDPIPER, 2 GREATER YELLOWLEGS, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH,, and 6 RUSTY BLACKBIRDS. All along Harmony Road, scattered sightings of BOBOLINKS, BROWN THRASHER, FIELD and SAVANNAH SPARROWS, WILSON’S SNIPE, EASTERN TOWHEE, YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER and WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW. South of Harmony Road, along Read Road, VIRGINIA RAIL, WILSON’S SNIPE, WHITE-THROATED SPARROW, BROWN CREEPER, BROWN THRASHER, VESPER SPARROW and more BOBOLINKS. Blessington Road had much the same species and UPLAND SANDPIPER, and Deseronto Road offered EASTERN TOWHEE and SAVANNAH SPARROW. Twenty-one species turned up at the Kingsford Conservation Area along the Salmon River with noteworthy species being BROAD-WINGED HAWK, HERMIT THRUSH and both WHITE-CROWNED and WHITE-THROATED SPARROW. At Deseronto’s Centennial Park, 16 GREATER SCAUP, 30 LESSER SCAUP and 4 BUFFLEHEAD  were seen offshore with other species being OSPREY, SPOTTED SANDPIPER, CASPIAN TERN and BELTED KINGFISHER.  At Barry Heights in Trenton, a birder casually sat in his lawn chair and watched 5 male ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS at the feeder at once, two RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES, 5 WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS, and a RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER calling from the oaks.  Along Highway 14 south of Marmora, AMERICAN BITTERN, SORA, VIRGINIA RAIL and MARSH WRENS.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
At the Moscow Marsh today, NORTHERN SHOVELER, RING-NECKED DUCKS (4), two PIED-BILLED GREBES, AMERICAN BITTERN, 3 VIRGINIA RAILS, COMMON GALLINULE and 2 LINCOLN’S SPARROWS  were all good finds. Among the 15 species on the Napanee Limestone Plains IBA today, were EASTERN KINGBIRD, AMERICAN KESTREL, BROWN THRASHER and  EASTERN MEADOWLARK. Oliver Side Road east of Deseronto had FIELD and SAVANNAH SPARROWS and a lone  WILD TURKEY. Twenty-two RUSTY BLACKBIRDS on County Road 11 east of Deseronto Road, AMERICAN KESTREL, HORNED LARK and VESPER SPARROW.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Some good finds at Presqu’ile Park today, among them, a first summer plumaged ICELAND GULL on Beach 2 and 3. Also seen in the Park was a PEREGRINE FALCON, 2 COMMON GALLINULES and the same number of PIED-BILLED GREBES.  Many of the same species of birds in the Park that are turning up elsewhere, but special mention of 3 BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHERS, AMERICAN WOODCOCK and four WINTER WRENS, OVENBIRD and NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH.
 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 03:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Now that BOBOLINKS have finally arrived, with 2 sightings yesterday and four today on Jackson’s Falls Road, we look forward to the arrival of a few more warblers and some of the later sparrow species as the migration forges bravely ahead. One such species, a GRASSHOPPER SPARROW was seen today on Jackson’s Falls Road, between Old Milford Road and County Road 17, near Milford. Other noteworthy species seen along this two-kilometre stretch of road at 6:30 a.m. this morning were 7 BROWN THRASHERS, 5 FIELD SPARROWS, 4 SAVANNAH SPARROWS, 3 EASTERN TOWHEES, and 7 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS. On Crowes Road, also in the Milford area, 17 species tallied there today included a SHARP-SHINNED HAWK, 1 RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER, a RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, 1 BROWN THRASHER, 3 FIELD SPARROWS, 1 EASTERN TOWHEE and the second WOOD THRUSH of the spring season (one was at Prince Edward Point yesterday). For the backyard birder, no shortage of birds these days as BALTIMORE ORIOLES, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS and INDIGO BUNTINGS start spending time at feeders. WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS and a few WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS  are also showing up scratching around at the base of feeders. Certainly no need to stop feeding birds just because it is spring. The secret is to discourage the more aggressive EUROPEAN STARLINGS and COMMON GRACKLES by simply changing the way in which you offer your feed, and closing down tray and platform feeders  thereby making it more difficult for these larger, more  troublesome birds to access, and going more with smaller hanging feeders. Above all, eliminate the traditional mixed feed which serves to attract blackbirds and stick with niger seed, finch feed and black oil sunflower seed. Works for me anyway.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
Backyard birders also having a good time with their avian guests in Lennox and Addington. At Heritage Point at Bath, both male and female BALTIMORE ORIOLES and ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS in a backyard there as well as CHIPPING SPARROWS, WHITE-THROATED and WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS at feeders. The star PAINTED BUNTING near Denbigh was present again today, and 19 other species in the area included BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER, 2 COMMON LOONS, 7 PURPLE FINCHES and 2 RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES. On Amherst Island today, some good sightings there were 2 GADWALL, 1 GREEN-WINGED TEAL, 2 EASTERN KINGBIRDS, 45 TREE SWALLOWS and a COMMON RAVEN.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Shorebirds, primarily Yellowlegs, continue to turn up here and there in Hastings County, mainly due to lots of flooded fields and other wet areas where they can forage. Nine GREATER YELLOWLEGS were seen today at Frankford Road and Wallbridge Road north of Belleville and three more were at Atkins Road today along with 5 of the LESSER species. Atkins Road also had 82 RING-BILLED GULLS, 2 WOOD DUCKS, 4 GREEN-WINGED TEAL and a couple SAVANNAH SPARROWS. Another repeat visit to Bata Island a couple minutes north of Frankford by a Belleville birder who was quick to recognize this small island as a mecca for migratory birds resulted in 34 species there today. A PIED-BILLED GREBE  was among them and also seen were 9 YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS, 1 BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER, PALM WARBLER, YELLOW WARBLER, a GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, MERLIN, BELTED KINGFISHER and a CASPIAN TERN.  HOUSE WRENS, WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS, and BELTED KINGFISHER were a few of the more noteworthy birds today in Foxboro. At Greenhill Lane up in the Industrial Park area of Belleville, a resident birder there checked off 23 species today, coming up with 80 AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES, 70 RED-WINGED BLACKBIRDS, BROWN THRASHER, NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW, MERLIN and a RED-TAILED HAWK. Best bird there was a LINCOLN’S SPARROW.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Nothing has come in from Northumberland County at time of writing.

 


TUESDAY, MAY 02:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Some new arrivals at Prince Edward Point today and some excellent tallies with one Kingston birder racking up a list of 81 species. Among new arrivals today were 5 NORTHERN PARULAS (all males and singing), CAPE MAY WARBLER, CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER, BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER, 2 BOBOLINKS, 1 WOOD THRUSH and 5 SCARLET TANAGERS. Another new arrival was a RED-EYED VIREO in the Point Traverse Woods. Two GREEN HERONS  were at Prince Edward Point. Other good sightings made by two separate observers there today were BLUE-HEADED VIREO, PURPLE FINCH, 120 RUBY-CROWNED KINGLETS, 300 YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS, 20 RUSTY BLACKBIRDS and 75 WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS. A pair of PEREGRINE FALCONS passed over the area, calling and chasing. At the Miller Family Nature Preserve, WILSON’S SNIPE, FIELD SPARROW and EASTERN TOWHEE were noteworthy, and at Jackson’s Falls Road near Milford, the arrival of another BOBOLINK in addition to the Prince Edward Point individuals of the spring season was noted. The Kaiser Crossroad flooded fields enjoyed the showers (3 inches!) we had yesterday. Present were 3 NORTHERN SHOVELERS, 23 NORTHERN PINTAILS, a GREEN-WINGED TEAL, 1 SPOTTED SANDPIPER and 3 GREATER YELLOWLEGS. Other sightings around the County today included a RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD at Sheba’s Island, and an INDIGO BUNTING at a feeder in Picton. A flooded agricultural field along Huff’s Island Road had 5 NORTHERN PINTAILS, 15 GREEN-WINGED TEAL, 17 CASPIAN TERNS and 33 LESSER/GREATER YELLOWLEGS. However, another flooded field along Highway 62 nearby had a few more LESSER and GREATER YELLOWLEGS  – an actual count of 83 of both species! The very wet Hamilton Wetland west of Demorestville had only a CASPIAN TERN today.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
Sixty-eight species were found on Amherst Island today where a few significant sightings there included 5 continuing DUNLIN, 1 GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, 49 PURPLE MARTINS and a COMMON YELLOWTHROAT. Other sightings from the island today were 18 GREEN-WINGED TEAL, 8 GADWALL, NORTHERN HARRIER, RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER, 12 HOUSE WRENS, BROWN THRASHER, and seven species of sparrow – SAVANNAH (3), SONG (8), WHITE-THROATED SPARROW (13), CHIPPING (2), and singles of FIELD, WHITE-CROWNED and SWAMP, along with 2 EASTERN TOWHEES (also members of the sparrow family). At the Amherst Island ferry dock, COMMON LOON, RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, COMMON GOLDENEYE, GADWALL and CANADA GOOSE. In the Denbigh area, the PAINTED BUNTING  continues to be  regular at a feeder south of that community. Of course, if you drive all that way to see a rare bird, you may as well see what else is around. In the area today, there were 2 COMMON LOONS, BELTED KINGFISHER, YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, AMERICAN KESTRELS, 50 TREE SWALLOWS, 25 BARN SWALLOWS, 3 RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH, 8 PURPLE FINCHES, 1 PINE SISKIN and 3 Warbler species – YELLOW-RUMPED, NASHVILLE and BLACK-THROATED GREEN.  
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
A male EASTERN BLUEBIRD made one birder’s day along Wallbridge/Loyalist Road today. Forty-six species were rounded up today at the H.R. Frink Conservation Area and Outdoor Education Centre at Plainfield. A BROAD-WINGED HAWK was seen at the Sugar Shack along the Drumlin Trail, and a MERLIN along the Marsh Boardwalk area. A new arrival today was a LEAST FLYCATCHER. A PILEATED WOODPECKER and 3 YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHERS, both HAIRY and DOWNY WOODPECKERS and NORTHERN FLICKER represented the Woodpecker family. Five warbler species were present – 3 OVENBIRDS, 3 NORTHERN WATERTHRUSHES, 1 BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER, a PINE WARBLER, and 5 YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS. Other good sightings and hearings were EASTERN KINGBIRD, WINTER WREN, and 3 RUSTY BLACKBIRDS. Two ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS  were at Foxboro today, as well as HOUSE WREN and 3 WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS. Yellowlegs species were at Atkins Road north of Elmwood Drive – 3 GREATER and five LESSER. Behind the Belleville Walmart Store, 50 TREE SWALLOWS and 12 BARN SWALLOWS were taking advantage of the conditions over the Moira River. Fifteen RUSTY BLACKBIRDS were seen along Airport Road east of Belleville today.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
Just outside Presqu’ile Park, Gosport produced 2 RUDDY DUCKS today. WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS and GREAT EGRET were seen by one visiting birder, and an EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILL was heard calling last night and 2 AMERICAN WOODCOCKS were displaying at night as well. At the Goodrich-Loomis Conservation Area today, north of Brighton, birds seen included OVENBIRD, PINE WARBLER, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, GRAY CATBIRD, EASTERN TOWHEE and YELLOW-BREASTED SAPSUCKER. The birder there tried a NORTHERN GOSHAWK call and, unfortunately, got a response. There is a pair nesting on the property and they have an attitude and don’t hesitate to swoop down with extended talons and remove any head gear that you may be wearing. The birds are nesting at the far end on a 2 km looped trail known as the Loop d’ Loop. If hiking along that trail this spring, watch your back!

 


MONDAY, MAY O1:

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
Thirty-three mm of rain last night followed by another 38 mm today, and it’s still raining as I write this. Hard to believe I actually responded to a local promotion and purchased another rain barrel to add to the three I already have, as well as a 250-gallon water storage tank! A typical knee-jerk reaction to the devastating drought we had last summer. Anyway, the rain didn’t stop the birds. Today, we enjoyed the presence of 2 male ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS and both a male and female BALTIMORE ORIOLE at our feeders today. Another new warbler arrival today – a COMMON YELLOWTHROAT – at the Miller Family Nature Reserve, singing in wet shrubby thickets by the lakeshore. Four other warblers on the property too – NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, YELLOW, YELLOW-RUMPED and NASHVILLE WARBLER (2). Also present, 2 SORA, SPOTTED SANDPIPER, 8 RUSTY BLACKBIRDS, NORTHERN HARRIER and MERLIN. Some good numbers with WHITE-THROATED SPARROW (59), CHIPPING SPARROW (19), FIELD SPARROW (14) and SWAMP SPARROW (8). Very early this morning (6:10 a.m.), 51 species were tallied at Prince Edward Point. WILSON’S SNIPE, SPOTTED SANDPIPER, 3 EASTERN KINGBIRDS, and 2 BLUE-HEADED VIREOS were among them. Also seen were 6 warbler species – BLACK-AND-WHITE, YELLOW, PALM, YELLOW-RUMPED, BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS and NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH. Sixteen WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS and 15 EASTERN TOWHEES  were good numbers. Along Long Point Road leading to the Point, another EASTERN KINGBIRD, WILSON’S SNIPE and YELLOW WARBLER. Five GREATER YELLOWLEGS and 6 LESSER YELLOWLEGS  were at Jackson’s Falls Road, and a SPOTTED SANDPIPER and 13 GREATER SCAUP were seen at Waupoos Marina. Kaiser Crossroad is certainly enjoying all the recent rains. Twenty-six species were counted there today, among them 5 WOOD DUCKS, a NORTHERN SHOVELER, 14 NORTHERN PINTAILS, a GREAT EGRET, 4 GREATER YELLOWLEGS and 3 LESSER YELLOWLEGS.
 
HASTINGS COUNTY
Starting with sewage, a good spot to find bird species, the sewage lagoons at Kenron Estates between Belleville and Trenton yielded 27 species in as many minutes today. The RUDDY DUCK  was still there, and also seen were 4 EASTERN KINGBIRDS, 4 YELLOW WARBLERS, a BELTED KINGFISHER, and one each of SWAMP SPARROW, NORTHERN CARDINAL, BROWN THRASHER, HOUSE WREN and BANK SWALLOW. Fifteen species in exactly the same number of minutes were found today at the Potter Creek Conservation Area in Quinte West. Noteworthy finds were RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH, YELLOW and NASHVILLE WARBLERS and NORTHERN CARDINAL. A new area in Hastings County donating a few birds today was Mount Pelion Park in Trenton. Found there today were 2 PINE WARBLERS, a BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER, 2 HERMIT THRUSHES and a CASPIAN TERN. At Atkins Road, east of Belleville today, 2 GREEN-WINGED TEAL, a GREATER YELLOWLEGS, SPOTTED SANDPIPER, 2 WILSON’S SNIPE and a GREAT BLUE HERON. The CAROLINA WREN was heard again today in the Barry Heights area of Trenton.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY
One birder in pouring rain managed 24 species in Cobourg today. Twenty-four WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS and 2 WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS  were among them, as were 10 RUBY-CROWNED KINGLETS as well as ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, NASHVILLE WARBLER, CHIPPING SPARROW and SONG SPARROW. WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS numbered 40 at Presqu’ile Park and there were also 50 AMERICAN ROBINS tallied. Also present were 2 GREATER YELLOWLEGS, a SPOTTED SANDPIPER, BELTED KINGFISHER, HERMIT THRUSH, RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, NASHVILLE WARBLER and CASPIAN TERNS.
 
LENNOX and ADDINGTON COUNTY
In Lennox and Addington County, the male PAINTED BUNTING is still located at 22262 Highway 41, just south of Denbigh. It spent the entire day yesterday at feeders there and was spotted again this morning, at 7:00 a.m. and was active all morning. A few scattered sightings around the county – ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK at a feeder in Croydon, a BROAD-WINGED HAWK north of Bon Echo Park, and a NORTHERN HARRIER on Nugent Road.
 



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July 26, 2017 6:40 pm